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Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, August 31, 201 1 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 1 



SAB 

Student Activities Board officers discuss goals, plans for year 



Taylor Graves 

News Editor 

The new officers of the Stu- 
dents Activities Board kicked, 
off the beginning of the se- 
mester with a running start. 

After the spring 2011 elections, 
President Shaquille Broussard and 
his new board spent the summer 
planning this semester's events. 
Some of the events include Welcome 
Week, Homecoming Week and Ve- 
gas Night. 

These new officers are focused 
on getting the students more in- 
volved with campus activities and 
listening to what they have to say. 

"My top priority right now is 
the students and letting them know 
they have a voice," Broussard. se- 
nior business administration major, 
said. 

Broussard was honored to be 
voted president for the 2011-2012 
term. He has big plans for his board 
and the students. 

"In the upcoming semesters 
1 want the board to be more active 
with the students," Broussard said. 

"I want us to hand out handbills 
and talk to the students about the 
event." 

Not only does Broussard want 
to be on the front lines for all events 
but also help in any way possible. 

understand that as being pres- 
ident you are the face of the organi- 
zation, but I want to be much more 
than that," he said. "I want to be the 
one getting involved- afidq4>elping 
with events by being the behind the 
scenes worker or whatever ts 'a'sked 
of me as long as it is for the better- 
ment of the students." 

Other new members are excited 
and hopeful for the semester. Aus- 
tin McCann, new Executive Rep- 
resentative at Large, is in charge of 




x ~- \ Submitted Photo 

SAB executives from left to right: Austin McCann (representive at large), Sarah Broadway (vice president), Shaqullie 
Broussard (president) and Solomon Matthews (secretary and treasurer). 



Photo by Tyler Young / Potpourri 

SAB posted signs for Welcome Week's Organizational Fair outside Fried- 
man Student Union to help students find an RSO to join. 



Homecoming Week 201 1 ancTSpring 
Fling 2012. He "wants- to make both 
events memorable for every student. 

"I plan on bringing a big name 
artist to Northwestern and have a big 
concert," McCann, junior liberal arts 
major, said. "This Homecoming will 
be one of the best Homecomings 
NSU has seen in a while." 

McCann knows these events 
are big and important to his fellow 
students, so he has an immense job 
ahead of him. 



"Being voted into this posi-t- 
tion truly br'ihgs on a lot 'of pressure"* 
and responsibility," McCann said. 
"However, the board and I feel that 
I am ready to do the job." 

Another important job for the 
new SAB is getting students to at- 
tend the weekly meetings. 

"I want it known that our meet- 
ings are open to the students every 
Wednesday at 5 p.m.," Broussard 
said. "By students coming to our 
meetings, they can give us more in- 



put on events and also tell us what 
-,! .-> want to see-on campus." 

SAB is not only about planning 
events. As a board, the members are 
responsible for proposals and bud- 
gets throughout the year. Solomon 
Matthews, new secretary and trea- 
surer, is responsible for helping SAB 
stay on top of administrative duties. 

"With my position, my top pri- 
ority is to keep committee heads, the 
executive representative and the spe- 
cial events coordinator updated on 
their budgets as well as ensuring that 



they have a copy of all the proposals 
they pass," Matthews, junior social 
work major, said. 

With all of the responsibilities 
and duties of SAB, the new mem- 
bers also want to have a fun, exciting 
environment to work in. 

"My top priority is to help the 
five committee heads plan their up- 
coming events and help create a fun 
board everyone wants to be apart 
of," Sarah Broadway, new vice pres- 
ident, said. 



SAB Fall 2011 Activities 

Sept 20 - Demon Scavenger 
Extravaganza 

Sept 27 -Vegan Night 

Sept 29 - Foreign Frenzy 

Oct 10-15 - Homecoming Week 

Oct 1 1 - Kyser BrickwayCook-off 

Dec 2 - Demon Recycle 
Awareness 



Rising textbook prices lead to new options 



Lauren Tullis 

Staff Reporter 
Taylor Graves 

News Editor 

As textbook prices keep rising, 
local bookstores try to offer 
different options to keep that 
sticker shock away. 

"I try to save as much money as 
possible before the semester starts," 
sophomore Paige Falgout said. "The 
little money I do save does not cover 
half the cost of my books, unfortu- 
nately." 

The estimated cost for books per 
semester is around SI 200, accord- 
ing to the NSU website. Although 
the cost of books may seem to rise, 
bookstores have created more op- 
tions in the recent years to help stu- 
dents save money. 

The first alternative to buying 
textbooks is to rent them. When rent- 
ing the book, students pay less than 
buying, although the amount differs 
from book to book. Students also 
have to return the book by a certain 
date. The date is usually at the end of 
the semester. 

Renting textbooks does not nec- 



essarily help students save money 
though. 

When returning the books, stu- 
dents do not get the chance to get 
some of their money back by resell- 
ing the book like they do when the 
textbook is actually purchased. 

Anna Dieter, junior art major, 
learned another downside to book 
renting when she started working at 
the Demon Bookstore. 

"Buying books is recommended 
because renting only saves you 10 
to 20 percent." Dieter said. "Plus if 
the book is stolen, lost or damaged, 
you have to pay for the damages and 
replace the book. Sometimes it can 
end up costing you double the nor- 
mal book price." 

Another choice is to buy E- 
books, which are cheaper because 
there is not a physical book. The E- 
book downloads to a computer and 
is available at anytime. 

According to the Barnes and 
Nobel University Bookstore, located 
in Friedman Student Union, more 
students are buying E-books. 

The bookstore believes the rise 
in E-book purchases is due to the 
fact that a lot of students are distance 



learning students who already do 
their classes online, so having books 
on their computer makes learning 
that much easier. 

No matter what option students 
choose for buying textbooks, the 
cost still has a dramatic effect on a 
student's budget, but some students 
have learned tricks to help save 
money. 

"The best advice I can give a 
new college student is to rent and 
buy as many used books as pos- 
sible," Falgout said. "It's also best if 
you pre-order your books before the 
semester starts, that way you have a 
better chance of finding better book 
deals." 

Students can also receive some 
help with textbook costs through the 
Financial Aid office. Book allow- 
ances are given to students with fi- 
nancial aid so students can buy text- 
books and other school supplies. 

According to the NSU Financial 
Aid website, "Students who have fi- 
nancial aid in excess of their charges 
can be eligible for a book allow- 
ance." 

So through the rise in prices, 
there can be some light for students. 




Graphic by Alison Roberts / Potpourri 



Index 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday Tuesday 


2 Life 


102771° 


95772° 


94772° 


94771° 


89771° 


93768° 96766° 


5 Opinions 

6 Sports 
















Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student. nsula.edu 

August 31, 2011 



Parkway 
Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 
(318) 352-5109 

movie times 



"Rise of the Planet 
of the Apes" 

Rated PG13 
4:10 p.m. 
6:50 p.m. 
9:30 p.m. 

"The Help" 

Rated PG13 
5 00 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 

"Spy Kids: All the 
Time in the World" 

Rated PG 
4:20 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 
9:30 p.m. 

"The Smurfs" 

Rated PG 
4:20 p.m. 

"30 Minutes or Less" 

Rated R 
7:00 p.m. 
9:40 p.m. 

"Conan the 
Barbarian" 

Rated R 
4:10 p.m. 
6:50 p.m. 
9:40 p.m. 




Photo by Katie Beverly / The Current Sauce 

Pictured above are NSU students entering the lecture in A. A. Fredricks by Tyson Wooters, "Don't Lose Your Head" which was hosted by SAB 

NSU students return for a busy Welcome Week 



Katie Beverly 

Co-Editor 

The beginning of a new school 
year is marked by a series of 
events following the annual 
Freshman Convocation. 

These events are designed for 
the new freshman class to grow ac- 
cusomed to the campus and are re- 
ferred to as "Welcome Week." 

This year the Student Activities 
Board committees have pulled to- 
gether a long list of entertainment to 
get the freshman involved in campus 
life. 

Welcome Week started off on 



Monday with a Luau Pool Party at 
University Place I, which was con- 
tinued on Tuesday with a lecture by 
Tyson Wooters, The Oregon Duck, 
titled "Don't Lose Your Head" in 
A. A. Frederick's Auditorium. 

A pep rally and scrimmage foot- 
ball game were planned for Wednes- 
day, followed by an early showing of 
the movie Thor on the field. 

"My favorite event was 'Movie 
on the Lawn," SAB secretary and 
treasurer, Solomon Matthews said. 
"Even though it was raining and we 
had to move to the Student Union, 
we had a pretty fair turnout and ev- 
eryone enjoyed the movie. And we 
weren't dying from the heat!" 



The week ended with an invitation 
to come out and support the NSU 
Demon soccer team on Friday at 8 
p.m. 

Although these events were 
designed to introduce the freshman 
class to campus life, many upper- 
classmen attended and met some of 
the freshman in the process. 

In this way the activities of Wel- 
come Week were enjoyed by all of 
the students at Northwestern. 

Although the SAB creates the 
program for Welcome Week, it isn't 
the only organization that is in- 
volved. 

Many churches, campus orga- 



nizations, sororities, and fraternities 
host extra events such as meet-and- 
greets, block parties and game nights 
to welcome the freshmen. 

Sasha Holloman, one of the in- 
coming freshmen at Northwestern, 
said that her favorite activity was the 
Information Station that was held on 
Monday in the Student Union Ball- 
room. 

The set-up of all of the organi- 
zations and clubs made it easy for 
her to learn more about all of the op- 
tions NSU has to offer. 

"Everyone was very helpful," 
she said. "I easily felt at home here, 
so getting into the swing of things 
wasn't so hard for me." 



NSU students 
move into 
campus 
housing 

Yevette Wagoner 

Life Editor 

Northwestern students were fi- 
nally able to move in to their 
on-campus apartments on Sat- 
urday, giving them two days to get 
settled before classes started. 

With the help of other students 
involved in various organizations 
such as Freshmen Connectors, De- 
mon VIPs, Resident Assistants. 
Ambassadors, surrounding churches 
and members of greek life, students 
were able to meet upper classmen 
who were able to ease their nerves of 
moving away from home. 

"Although it was extremely hot 
when students started arriving at 8 
a.m., that didn't stop us from getting 
excited for move-in day! It was nice 
to represent NSU as both a Fresh- 
man Connector and a greek leader 
and be able to meet so many new 
students and their parents," junior 
Afton Owens said. 

Residents will be meeting with 
their RA's this week to go over cam- 
pus housing rules, as well as answer 
any questions they may have. 

"I am excited for monthly 
events starting in September where 
all residents get to meet each other 
and have the opportunity to get in- 
volved on campus," Resident Assis- 
tant Kathryn Greene said. 




Members of Pi Kappa Phi cycle the U.S. 

for people with disabilities 



1 * 



Photo by Jessica Nuss 

Above Chase Harvey, Nick Breauz and Cameron Moises in front of the State Capitol in Washington, D.C. show- 
ing pride by holding our state and university flags 



raising money 

Pi Kappa Phi Report: 

This past summer two students 
had the opportunity to partici- 
pate in life changing events. 
Chase Harvey and Cameron 
Moises, members of Pi Kappa Phi 
fraternity, participated in Push 
America's Journey of Hope. 

Push America is the non-profit 
philanthropic organization of Pi 
Kappa Phi fraternity for people with 
disabilities. 

In 1987, one man's dream of 
riding his bike across the country 
inspired Push America to create the 
Journey of Hope. 

Journey of Hope is a cross- 
country bicycle trek beginning in 
San Francisco, Calif, and Seattle, 
Wash, and ending with all teams to- 
gether in Washington, DC. 



The Journey of Hope is a ride 
with a purpose. It raises funds and 
awareness for people with disabili- 
ties. 

"The Journey of Hope is about 
many things," Moises said. "It is 
about challenging the norm. It is 
about serving our communities. It 
is about finding out more about our- 
selves than we ever imagined. It is 
about a mission. It is about hope." 

Today, Journey of Hope riders 
cover 32 different states and cycle 
over 12,000 miles for people with 
disabilities. 

The Journey of Hope is solely 
comprised of members of Pi Kappa 
Phi from across the nation and con- 
tinues to spread a message of accep- 
tance and understanding for people 
with disabilities. 

Since the ride started it has 



raised over $15 million for people 
with disabilities, with $500,000 
raised each year. 

When asked how the trip 
changed his life, Harvey said, "we 
are supposed to be changing the 
lives of people with disabilities, but 
these individuals effect our lives 
more than they will ever know." 

NSU's Pi Kappa Phi frater- 
nity participates in Push America's 
events every summer and have been 
doing so for the past five years. 

The Push America motto is 
"building leaders of tomorrow by 
serving people with disabilities to- 
day." 

This is true in the Beta Omicron 
chapter of Pi Kappa Phi who strive 
everyday to make the world a better 
place for people with disabilities. 



Checking 





4*m 



Low Fees 

REALLY, THEY'RE JUST THE BEGINNING 
OF HOW WE HELP YOU THRIVE 



311 Keyser Ave 

Federally Insured by NCUA 



L a Capit ol 

FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 

TOGETHER WE THRIVE 
926 University Pkwy • 800.522.2748 7 www.lacapfcu.org 




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SOUTHERN TIDE 



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600 Front St. 
Natchitoches. LA 71457 
318 352 4177 




Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student. nsula.edu 

August 31, 2011 




Welcome 




I y, 

August 20-26, 2011 

Saturday 
Move-in Day 

Sunday 

Class of 2015 New Student Convocation 
President's Picnic 

Monday 
Luau Pool Party 

Tuesday 
Demons on Tour 
Organizational Fair 
"Don't Lose Your Head" 

Wednesday 
Night Pep Rally 
NSU Football Scrimmage 
Movie Night 

Thursday 
Block Party 
BCM Game Night 




Photo by Tyler Young / Potpourri 

Patrick Thomas (sophomore science major), Dezrick Williams (sophomore engineering major) and Antonio Beaudion (sophomore business admin- 
istration major) start off the first week by serenading Adriane Granger (junior nursing major) and Ketia Morrison (junior nursing major) outside the 
Friedman Student Union. 




Northwestern JtaS 




Photo by Tyler Young / Potpourri 

Lindsey Rolling (senior early childhood development major) and Haley Wilson (junior accounting major) represent 
Sigma Sigma Sigma and encourage students to get involved on campus at the Organizational Fair. Sigma Sigma 
Sigma is one of four Panhellenic sororities on campus. 



Photo by Tyler Young / Potpourri 

Leah Lapoint (sophomore education major), Robin Wilder (sophomore early childhood education major) and Mae- 
gan Morace (senior hospitality, management and tourism major) work the Inferno booth. Freshmen will have the 
chance to run out on the field at the beginning of the first home game this Thursday to show their school spirit. 







if i'i'i ii f ii iiMiiiiii W mi i 1 1 li i iTrilTTl^fl Ult^ i W> ii ili r i 




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'Em 




Opinions 



Hunter Bower 
Opinions Editor 
hbowerOO 1 @student.nsula.edur 

August 31, 2011 




NSU 
dress 
code 
tips for 
2011 

Hunter Bower 

Opinions Editor 

" ~ come 
back 
fellow Demons! 
1 hope that ev- 
Myone has had 
™ i great summer! 
HT I wanted 
my first column 
to be sort of an influential message 
to all incoming freshman and also to 
the current students so it has taken 
me a while to think of what to write 
about. 

I came across a v ideo of a co- 
median giving out fashion tips on 
YouTube and after I had wiped the 
tears from my eyes from laughing 
hysterically I started to think about 
how true some of his stories were. 

So, 1 thought to myself, why not 
give out some tips to incoming fresh- 
man and current students at NSU. 

Today, I give you tips for the 
2011-2012 school year: 

L Certain things should not be 
sold in certain sizes. 

If your stomach blocks the 
view from your shoes, then cover it 
up! The only people who should be 
wearing belly shirts are the people 
with no bellies! 

2. To those who wear the cotton 
shorts with the words printed on the 
back. 

If your thighs look like the 
hood of a white Toyota van after a 
hailstorm then you are not "JUICY". 

3. Tattoos are not for everyone. 
It is going to be tough for your 

kids to take you seriously when you 
tell them to say no to drugs and you 
have a pot plant tattooed on your 
neck! 

4. Low-cut tank tops do not 
look good on anyone. 

If your skin is as white as Cool 
Whip and you have a mole the size 
of an oatmeal pie, then let that be 
your little secret! 

5. It is okay to wear a t-shirt 
with nothing on it. 

If you want to know anything 
about a certain person, all you have 
to do is look at the shirt that they are 
wearing. 

If you give me a college stu- 
dent's shirt drawer, I can tell you 
what kind of car they drive, what 
beer they drink, what radio station 
they listen to, where they went to 
high school, their favorite college 
football team, their philosophy on 
life and w here they have been on va- 
cation the past ten summers. 

And please do not wear an "I'm 
with stupid" t-shirt in public if you 
are by yourself. 

6. And finally, couples should 
never dress alike unless they are go- 
ing to a Garth Brooks concert or a 
Halloween party. 

So there you have it folks. 
Those are my tips to having a suc- 
cessful school year without any criti- 
cism from anyone. 

So remember NSU students, 
follow these tips and you will have 
a long and happy school year! Fork 
'Em Demons! 



THEY'LL DO IT EVERY TIME 

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time, be 
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5 by Linda Thistle 

Without rotating the small squares on the right, try to arrange them into 
the pattern shown in the diagram at the left so that the number next to 
each large triangle equals the sum of the four numbers in that triangle. 



41 



44 




24 




7 >< 9 



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© 20l l King Features Sync!.. Inc. 



MAMA'S 30YZ www.mamasboyz.com JERRY CRAFT 



5IX MONTHS \ 
WITH GOOD / 
BEHAVJIOPTy 




The 



Current Sauce 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Hunter Bovver 
Opinion Editor 

Z.K. Melendon 
Sauce Columnist 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor- in - Chief 



Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 

Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce(S gmaiLcom 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Shana Lee 
Sauce Reporter 



Staff Reporter 

Kyla Winey 
"reshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 



Come by our of- 
fice, 227 Kyser, 
and apply to be- 
come a staff writ- 
er for The Current 
Sauce. Meetings 
start at 6 p.m. ev- 
ery Monday. We 
hope to hear from 
you. 

- The Sauce Staff 



s you 
may 
have no- 
ticed, it is time 
to study again. 
)r it could 
fie time to go 
(through Rush. 

And fur- 
ther still, it could 
be time to drink at the bar, meet, 
greet, go to Wal-Mart (again may- 
be), and possibly have a chance at 
romancing a co-ed if you please. 

One piece of advice you may 
have heard from some authority is 
that it is unfortunate to make many 
mistakes. 1 am talking primarily to 
the freshmen here and I will get to 
the rest of you in a wee bit. My ad- 
vice: MAKE TONS OF 'EM! How- 
ever, be sure to learn from all of 
them. 

So go ahead and spend too 
much money at a watering hole of 
your discretion and talk to that cute 
girl or guy in the desk in front of you 
with a creepy smile. 

Remember to cram for tests, 
forget the seven-bazillion passwords 
for the various student webs, and eat 
all the fast food you heart desires. 
You are at the point in time where 
it is the last opportunity to be read- 
ily forgiven for your mistakes and it 
is the best time to correct them. Af- 
ter this, "real life" gets harsh... or 
harsher. 

Now keep in mind that the ex- 
cuse or reason T was out to make 
mistakes and that's how I ended up 
in prison' will not go so well as you 
hope, unfortunately. Yet, should a 
blooper arrive in the highlight reel 
of your collegiate experience, make 
sure you know why it happened that 
way and what will you do differ- 
ently. And yes, I know. I sound like 
a father right now, albeit a sensible 
one. 

All of us at NSU have blunders 
from the last years, weeks or even 
days. Depending on severity, we 
ought to let them go through our ed- 
ucation of ourselves. The neat thing 
about mistakes and errors is that 
once you have learned from them 
properly, you can forget all about 
them by doing whatever it was you 
were supposed to be doing when you 
made them. 

For example. I have not been 
in humble Natchitoches for a while. 
So should I get bent out of shape if 
I cannot remember old faces, names, 
and passwords? Or should I get up- 
set if I cannot figure out how the fee 
payment ritual will go down this se- 
mester? Heck no! I'll learn (and I as- 
sure you I have). 

That is probably not even the 
worst error for me in the past week, 
but I wouldn't know. Nor should I 
feel bad if I make more, for I have at 
the very least a semester to do right 
by myself. 

So my opinion is thus: I do 
not agree with the above advice of 
avoiding any and all mistakes. You 
are here to learn more than science, 
math, humanities and language. You 
are also here to leam about yourself 
and your own functioning, too. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 



www.thecurre 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
August 31, 2011 



NSU Soccer wins with clean sheet 



Shana Lee 

Sauce Reporter 

The Lady Demons walked off 
the field victoriously Friday- 
night after battling it out with 
University of Arkansas-Little Rock. 

With the first home game of the 
season come nerves that can only be 
fixed with the support from the De- 
mon fans and getting a big win under 
the belt. 

"We had a big crowd so I'm ex- 
cited and glad we were able to win 
the game even with first game jit- 
ters," sophomore-midfielder Ashlee 
Savona said. The only score of the 
night came in the 17* minute of 
the first half from senior-forward 
Meghan Hunter when she nailed a 
shot from 30 yards out. 

"I was excited about our first 
home game," Hunter said. "I had 
to remind myself to stay composed. 
Savona gave me a really good pass 
that set me up for my score. We 
dropped a little in the second half 
but now we know what to work on 
in practice." 

The first half was full of great 
opportunities for Northwestern 
State's offense to score. The Lady 
Demons took eight shots with three 
being on goal. During the second 
half, UALR spent a lot of time on 
the offensive side. Luckily, NSU's 
stingy defense stuffed multiple op- 
portunities from UALR. 

"We've worked a lot on our de- 
fense this week," head Coach Jimmy 
Mitchell said. "We lost Alex Rios 
this week and she was kind of hold- 
ing us together." Sophomore goal- 
keeper Jessica Danku came out to 





Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Demon quarterback Paul Harris completes a pass during the final scrimmage before the start of the season this 
Thursday night in Turpin Stadium. 

Demon football prepares for season opener 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Senior Lady Demon forward Meghan Hunter celebrates her goal with team- 
mates. The Lady Demons won 1-0 over UALR 



challenge the ball in the last three 
minutes of the game thus causing 
UALR to miss a crucial shot. 

"One thing some people don't 
realize is that when we're under 
pressure, Jessica's ability to take 
goal kicks and punts and put them on 
the other half of the field helps the 
whole team tremendously" Mitchell 
said. Even in the last minute UALR 
set off several last attempt shots but 
NSU defense held their ground. 

"This was a big win for us. 



UALR is a good team. We played 
well the first half and Hunter and Sa- 
vona stayed composed. In the sec- 
ond half UALR stepped up but our 
defense and goalie stayed focused 
on the job at hand. We have a young 
team and we are getting better," 
Mitchell said. 

The Lady Demons are set to 
battle on the pitch once again on Fri- 
day, Sept. 2 when they visit Prairie 
View A&M. The next home game 
will be on Sept. 1 1 against Tulsa. 



Despite quick start, Lady 
Demons falls in four sets 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor- in- Chief 

The Demons football team 
passed its final test last 
Wednesday in what was the 
last team scrimmage. 

First and second team players 
were pitted against one another as 
Demon head coach Bradley Dale Pe- 
veto watched from the sidelines. 

"I'd give my team an "A," Pe- 
veto said. " I've been very happy 
with the team. They've done what 
we asked them to do, and they are in 
great football shape." 

The team is entering the fall 
season with huge expectations hav- 
ing improved significantly from 
their winless season of 2009. Last 
season, the Demons led the confer- 



ence at one point but a sluggish fin- 
ish resulted in a record of 5-6. After 
40-plus camp practices, the Demons 
are no longer cannibalizing itself but 
instead they are prepping for the sea- 
son opener against Delta State. 

"We're excited that people no- 
tice that we are making improve- 
ments here at Northwestern State. 
We're preparing for one team now 
and that is Delta State and the word 
around the Northwestern State foot- 
ball is "beat Delta State," Peveto 
said. 

The Demons are returning key 
starters on both sides of the ball 
including junior quarterback Paul 
Harris and junior linebacker Derek 
Rose. 

Due to an injury, Harris was out 
most of the summer. 

"I felt deprived of football this 



summer, but I'm back out here with 
my team and I'm more excited than 
I've ever been." 

Harris explained that Delta 
State should not be taken lightly 
even though they are a Division II 
team. "They're a zone team that's 
fast on defense, but they have weak 
points and [coach] Cooley got most 
of the game plan in," Harris said. 

Delta State University finished 
the 2010 season with a record of 1 1- 
15. They lost in the national champi- 
onship to Minnesota Duluth by the 
score of 20- 1 7. The team is currently 
on a 1-0 win streak after defeating 
Elizabeth City State 28-21 in an 
overtime victory while NSU has yet 
to experience game conditions. 

The first game is this Thursday 
at 6:00 p.m in Turpin Stadium. 



Super Crossword 



WAYNE'S 
WORLD 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Courtesy of Sports Info 

After a very impressiv e first set 
on Saturday to start oft' day 
two of the Southern Missis- 
sippi Volleyball Invitational, North- 
western State would fall to the host 
team in four sets - 19-25, 25-13, 25- 
13 and 25-11. 

The loss dropped the Lady De- 
mons to 1-2 on the season after the 
opening weekend of the 201 1 slate. 

Freshman Kelly Jimenez tallied 
a game-high 10 kills and pitched 
in with nine digs. Freshman Stacy 
DiFrancesco finished on nine at- 
tacks, while freshman Vanessa Cole- 
man and junior Nicole Hajka record- 
ed eight kills each. 

On the defensive side, freshman 
Keelie Arneson recorded a game- 
high 25 digs and passed the ball ex- 
ceptionally well. 

"Keelie had a great match, espe- 
cially passing." said co-head coach 
Hugh Hemesman. "I was excited to 
see her bounce back in our last two 
matches from a tough passing game 
in the season-opener." 

The Lady Demons started slow, 



trailing 1-6 in the first set. An early 
kill by freshman Mackenzie Neely 
got them going, and a Hajka spike 
tied it 9-9. 

NSU found itself in the lead 13- 
10 after a DiFrancesco kill, and ex- 
tended the lead to 1 9- 1 4 on a block 
assist by Neely and Emily Sweet. 

The Golden Eagles cut the lead 
down to 20-18, but after a NSU 
timeout, DiFrancesco had a block 
that rallied the Lady Demons and got 
them up 24-18. Coleman put away 
an attack to give NSU the first set 
25-19. 

"We served very aggressively 
and got them out of sync early on," 
said Hemesman. 

Sweet had 13 assists in the set 
while Arneson had nine digs. NSU 
outblocked Southern Mississippi 16- 
1 in the set. Sweet dished out 34 as- 
sists in the match. 

The Lady Demons won the first 
set in all three matches in the invita- 
tional. In the second set, Hajka had a 
couple early put-avvays to help keep 
pace at 7-7. Quality blocking by 
Southern Mississippi put the Lady 

Demons in an 11-15 hole and 
NSU just wasn't able to re-gain the 



momentum, dropping the second set 
25-13. 

"Southern Mississippi's passing 
started to warm up as the match went 
along and got some good looks on its 
attacks," Hemesman said. 

The Lady Demons were taking 
good swings but they just weren't 
dropping in the third and fourth sets. 

NSU called timeout to try to 
rally the troops trailing 11-19 in the 
third, but it wasn't enough to slow 
down the Golden Eagles' attackers. 

Southern Mississippi would 
keep the balling rolling in the fourth, 
and the Lady Demons would drop 
the last two sets 25-13 and 25-11. 

"We need some more balance 
on our setting selections because 
we went too much on the outside to- 
wards the end of the match," Hemes- 
man said. "We will work on getting 
our middle hitters more involved so 
that teams won't be able to figure us 
out." 

Up next, the Lady Demons will 
travel to Lubbock, Texas to play 
Morehead State on Friday at noon 
at the Texas Tech Invitational. NSU 
will also take on Texas Tech and 
UNLV in the tournament. 



ACROSS 


topping 


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91 Proust 


1 Big bargain 


57 Fretful 


103 Lost one's 


12 Flu 


48 -do-well 


protagonist 


6 Carpentry 


60 Songwriter 


tail? 


symptom 


51 Supermarket 


92 Eye appre- 


device 


Greenwich 


104 A shake in 


13 cat 


vehicle 


ciatively 


11 Diplomacy 


62 Jean of 


the grass? 


14 Shelley's 
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role in 'The 


One* 


Wayne 


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help it!" 


instrument 


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final film 


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25 Tea of 


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Vance 


campus 


directed by 


jogging 


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Truth" 


68 Emulate 


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Wayne 


73 Maestro 


city 


29 Prayer 


102 Down 


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26 Wayfarer's 


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sack 


Shirley 


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Louis 


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1 25 Actor Epps 


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place 


car or pea 


79 Corn 


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creator 


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C58 film) 


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DOWN 


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author 


meas. 


41 Small mall 


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warrior 


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79 Mindy's 


113 To and 


42 Bearing 


teur Toots 


2 " Colors" 


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mate 


115 Pigskin 


43 Faced the 


88 Seat cover? 


('86 hit) 


Your Life" 


80 Circle 


prop 


day 


89 Actress 


3 Teacup part 


emcee 


section 


116 'Tell 


44 Wayne's 


Peggy 


4 Tackled a 


39 Part of 


81 Fathered a 


About It" 


birth name 


90 Oscar- 


taco 


HOMES 


foal 


('83 song) 
117 " see it 


49 Grande 


winning 


5 Margin 


40 Author Anita 


82 Neighbor of 


50 Plot 


Wayne role 


6 Singer 


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Jordan 




53 Facilitate a 


95 Hugh of 


Sheryl 


~ "Cocoon" 


83 Waiter's 


118 Gum gob 


felony 


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7 -di-dah 


42 Melville title 


offering 


119 Overwhelm 


54 Poetic 


Crooks" 


8 Palindromic 


start 


84 Fancy 




preposition 


97 Spineless 


name 


45 "Nowhere 


appetizer 
87 TV's "Max 




55 Makes 


98 Egg 


9 "Mai de " 


_" ('66 hit) 




one's mark 


evaluation 


10 Luciano's 


46 Actress 






56 Tortellini 


99 Rich soup 


colleague 


Diamond 


88 Teen title 





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Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, September 7, 2011 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.coiu 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 2 



24-23 

Demon football pull off comeback 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor- in- Chief 

Quarterback Brad 
Henderson, a newcomer 
to the Demon football 
roster, found himself in an 
unlikely situation. 

Down 17-0 at the half, 
Henderson was given the 
task of finding a way to bring 
the Demons back from-what 
could have been-a home- 
opening loss. 

In dramatic fashion, the 
Demon football team earned 
a nail-biting 24-23 win 
over Delta State University, 
Thursday night in Turpin 
Stadium. 

The victory gave NSU its 
499 ,h all-time win. 

Henderson, a junior 
transfer from East Mississippi 
CC-Scooba, explained that 
he was extremely nervous 
because he had never played 
in an environment like that. 

He entered the game when 
Demon head coach Bradley 
Dale Peveto pulled former 
starting quarterback Paul 
Harris after three series. 

"TKFSpeed of trf&'game ~ 
is a lot faster than what I am 
used to playing," Henderson 
said. 

"My teammates had great 
confidence in me, and that 
was a great push for me to go 
out and help win the game for 
them." 

Delta State drew first 
blood with 3:21 remaining 
in the first quarter. Micah 
Davis capped off a 98-yard 
drive with a 1-yard run for a 
touchdown. 

The Statesmen would go 
unanswered for two more 
scores after Davis completed 
a pass to Lavon Downs for an 




photo by Gary Hardamon 

Demon faithful sing the alma mater after the 24-23 win over Delta State. The crowd's attendance helped the Demons 
win a close game in Turpin Stadium. 



photo by Gary Hardamon 

Demon transfer quarterback Brad Henderson stares downfield for open tar- 
gets. Henderson completed his first 13 passes in win over Delta State. 



8-yard touchdown and kicker 

■ Matt Dean-made-a -23-yard 

field goal. 

The Demons went into the 
locker room at halftim*; dow n 
1 7 points, but things began to 
turn around in the 3 rd quarter. 

The defense held strong on 
the first drive after the break, 
forcing a three-and-out, which 
started a momentum shift on 
the field. 

"We started to bring more 
pressure in the second half," 
Demon linebacker Derek 
Rose said. 

"Coach Laird likes to 
attack the quarterback and 
that's what we did." 

The team's ability to move 



the ball on offense improved 
signifiranfty-m'the-seeond- - 
half. NSU rushed for 71 yards 
just in the 3 rd quarter alone. 

NSU's offense finally got 
on the board early in the 3 rd 
quarter. 

Henderson continued 
his pass-completion streak, 
making it 13 straight with a 
32-yard touchdown pass to 
tight end Justin Aldredge two 
minutes into the second half. 

The Demons added two 
more scores thanks to a 
touchdown run by Sterling 
Endsley and a 27-yard John 
Shaughnessy field goal that 
put the team up 24-17. 

It was all but over as 



the Statesmen found a way 
to- come within one point, 
making the score 24-23. 

The Demon defense 
managed to stop a two-point 
conversion attempt to seal the 
victory. 

We made just enough 
plays to win," Peveto said. 
"We made a ton of mistakes 
that could have cost us. But 
we kept fighting, we stayed 
together, we didn't stop 
believing, and we won the 
football game. We'll enjoy it 
and turn the page to LSU." 

The Demons are set to 
face the Tigers this Saturday 
in Baton Rouge. Kickoff is at 
7:00 p.m. 



NSU 



LSU 





September 10, 2011 
Only 240 tickets remaining 




Taylor Graves 

News Editor 

NSU got freshmen and up- 
per classmen involved in the 
first home game of the season 
by hosting the Inferno. 

More than 400 freshmen 
joined their fellow Demon 



fans in cheering for the NSU 
football team at the beginning 
of Thursday night's game. 

This new spirit-filled 
tradition was modeled from 
Baylor University's home 
opening run. 

All the students who 
signed up for the Inferno were 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 



given shirts and a chance to 
run onto the field and help 
bring in the football players 
along with the NSU cheer- 
leaders. 

NSU plans to introduce 
more spirit activities for the 
students. 



NSU News Bureau 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity honored Louisiana Teach- 
er of the Year and alumna 
April Jessup Giddens during 
the Delta State - Northwest- 
ern State football game. 

Giddens, a sixth grade 



toches Magnet. 

"It's very hum- 
bling and I'm very ex- 
cited," Giddens said. 
"This casts a positive 
light on Natchitoches 
and on Northwest- 
ern. 

Joining in on the 
presentation were, 
from left, State. Sen. 
Gerald Long, State 
Sen. Ben Nevers of 
Bogalusa; Dr. Der- 
wood Duke, super- 
intendent of Natchi- 
nsu News Bureau toches Parish Schools; 
teacher at Natchitoches Mag- Dr Vickie Gentry, dean of 



net School, earned a bach- 
elor's degree at NSU in 1996 
and a master's in 1998. 

During her 15 -year teach- 
ing career, she taught at NSU 
Middle Lab School and for 
the last four years at Natchi- 



the College of Education and 
Human Development, Gid- 
dens; Northwestern President 
Dr. Randall J. Webb and NSU 
student Mariah Courville, 
president of Sigma Sigma 
Sigma sorority, Giddens' 
sorority. 



Index 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


2 Life 


85753° 


86754° 


90755° 


90760° 


91761° 


95764° 


96766° 


3 Opinions 
















4 Sports 

















I 

4 




Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 
September 7, 201 1 



NSU students give hope to stray animals 



Katie Beverly 

Co-editor 

NSU students help 
Natchitoches Hope for 
Paws rescue, house and 
care for stray animals. 

Natchitoches Hope for 
Paws was founded when the 
Natchitoches City Animal 
Shelter was closed for a short 
period of time. It is a no-kill 
facility that acts as a foster 
and adoption organization for 
all of Natchitoches Parish. 

Jenn Helander, Hope of 
Paws volunteer, sees how 
many NSU students help with 
the program. 

"The students at North- 
western University were the 
most active volunteers that 
participated in keeping the 
facility running," Helander 
said. 

Both fraternities and 
sororities have helped the 
organization since it has been 
in operation. Individual stu- 
dents also volunteer their time 
to the stray dogs and cats by 
cleaning, feeding, checking 
any wounds and playing with 
them. 

"Playing with the animals 
is my favorite part," Tori 
Smith, sophomore liberal arts 



major, said. "Just being able 
to have fun and play with a 
friendly animal who I hope 
will get a home one day is 
great." 

Students also get attached 
to the pets, which keeps 
bringing them back to volun- 
teer. 

"My favorite part of work- 
ing with Hope for Paws was 
seeing my favorite dogs, like 
Mae West and Bruno," Caitlin 
Busey, senior HMT major, 
said. 

Smith and Busey both 
know their volunteer work 
is time-consuming and 
sometimes difficult, but they 
agree doing a good deed for 
a helpless animal is worth it 
and hopes more students get 
involved. 

"If I were to get students 
involved I would be honest 
with them," Busey said. "I'm 
not saying it's an easy job, 
and surely not a glamorous 
one. However each time I left 
the facility, I felt good know- 
ing that for once I was doing 
something that is completely 
selfless." 

Hope for Paws is also an 
advocate for animal caring. 
They stress that all pet owners 
should spay and neuter their 



pets. These simple procedures 
can drastically lower the num- 
ber of stray dogs and cats in 
the Natchitoches area. 

The organization is willing 
to offer monetary assistance 
to pet owners that fill out an 
application for aid. With a co- 
pay of $25 the animal can be 
spayed or neutered by a vet- 
erinarian in the community. 

Helander said spayed and 
neutered animals are health- 
ier, less aggressive and less 
territorial. 

NSU also helps with this 
aspect of Hope for Paws by 
participating in a spray and 
neuter day through the Vet- 
erinary Technology program. 
The Vet Tech program also 
does routine check-ups on 
animals. 

Hope for Paws also pro- 
vides all stray animals with 
up-to-date shots and health 
care, which means they have 
a veterinary bill of almost 
$1,000 every month. 

Despite all this help, Hope 
for Paws is sorely in need of 
volunteers to keep the animals 
fed and exercised regularly. 

With around three phone 
calls a week for abandoned 
animals in Natchitoches 
Parish, the facility is near 



capacity. The constant flow of 
neglected and stray animals 
makes it impossible for Hope 
for Paws to solely provide 
space for all of the incoming 
animals. 

Some ways students and 
residents can get involved is 
through the fostering pro- 
gram, which only requires 
a fenced in backyard. This 
helps the organization give 
pets a temporary honie until 
they are able to find perma- 
nent homes. 

Another important way to 
help is through donations of 
dog and cat food, Dawn soap, 
bleach and even bones for the 
dogs. Donations can be made 
to the facility or to a local 
Natchitoches city veterinary 
office. 



"SPAYghetti Lunch and 
Dinner Fundraiser" 

Friday, Sept 16 
First Presbyterian Church 

114 Bienville St. 

U a.m. - 7 p.m. 

bu can help Hope for Paws 
by purchasing a chicken 
spaghetti plate for $10. 




Photo by Katie Beverly / Current Sauce 
Jacob, a stray dog, comes to NSU Vet Tech program for his annual checkup. NSU 
students are able to get hands-on experience by helping the Hope for Paws organi- 
zation. 




Fraternity recruiting 
reaches new high 



Jeff Bninner and Solomon Matthews, Theta Chi fraternity members, work an informational booth at an organizational browse to 
encourage men to sign up for fraternity recruitment. . 



Checking 




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Federally Insured by NCUA 



Brooke Neilsen 

Sauce Reporter 

The Interfraternity Re- 
cruitment ended Thurs- 
day night with move 
than 100 men participating to 
find the right Greek fraternity 
to join. 

The Interfraternity Coun- 
cil serves as the governing 
body for the six fraternities on 
campus and strives to unite its 
chapter members, strengthen 
their values and achieve their 
goals. 

"This year's turnout has 
been more than we have had 
in years," Natalie Laurence, 
director of Fraternity and 
Sorority Life, said. 

These men used Recruit- 
ment to look at the six NSU 
fraternities who stand for five 
main ideals: scholarship, ser- 
vice, leadership, brotherhood 
and social. 

Finding a fraternity to 
join can help young college 
students grow in these five 
ideals. 

"A fraternity can be a huge 
motivational tool to stay aca- 
demically successful through- 
out college," Scott Mayeaux, 
Pi Kappa Phi president, said. 



Another reason so many 
incoming students take an 
interest in joining a fraternity 
is to meet new people. 

"The biggest benefit of 
being in a fraternity on NSU's 
campus is having a true fam- 
ily away from your own," 
Solomon Matthews, Theta 
Chi Fraternity president, said. 

"Having a group of men 
that you know you can rely on 
and that push you to be better 
in not only academics, but 
also in character." 

Formal Recruitment con- 
sists of three days followed 
by Bid Day. 

Convocation is held before 
Recruitment, which is where 
prospective members are 
strongly encouraged to keep 
an open mind throughout the 
process. 

The first two nights the 
men are split into two groups, 
and they attend three houses 
each night. 

At each of the houses, they 
meet active members and 
learn about each fratnernity 
chapter's history, philanthro- 
py and academic success. 

The third night is "Prefer- 
ence" night, and the partici- 
pants are advised to go back 



to the houses they enjoyed 
the most. They are allowed to 
go to as many houses as they 
choose for this night. 

Recruitment Week ended 
with Bid Day where prospec- 
tive members went to the 
Student Union to pick up their 
bids. 

The six fraternities in- 
volved in Recruitment include 
Kappa Alpha Order, Kappa 
Sigma, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma 
Nu, Tau Kappa Epsilon and 
Theta Chi. 

These fraternities will have 
open recruitment the next two 
weeks, which is a more casual 
chance for interested men to 
see what each fraternity chap- 
ter stands for and has to offer, 
while also getting a chance 
to hang out with active mem- 
bers. 

No matter how students go 
through, the overall experi- 
ence of joining a fraternity is 
the same. 

"Guys should join a frater- 
nity because it's a great way 
to get involved," Mayeaux 
said. "It open doors for other 
opportunities on campus, it 
will also open doors for op- 
portunities throughout life." 




LACOSTE 

The Hall Tree 
#1 Bienville Square 
Natchitoches. IA 71457 
318 352 5631 




Opinions 



Hunter Bower 
Opinions Editor 
hbowerOO 1 @student.nsula.edur 
September 7, 201 1 




Hunter Bower 

Opinion Editor 



Will the real 
NSU fans 
please stand 
up? 

si 

looked 
out from 
he press box 
last Thurs- 
ay, I noticed 
NSU 
football team 
warming up 
and the band 
marching in. 
I kept looking and waiting 
but I never saw the stands fill 
up. 

I can't think of any more 
reason for someone not to 
show up to the game. We 
played on a Thursday night 
when not even LSU was 
playing. I just don't under- 
stand w hy we cannot get any 
support. 

Someone please tell me 
what this school is missing? 
If I see everything clearly 
then I believe that this school 
is doing all it can to ensure 
that the game day environ- 
ment is as good as it can be. 

McNeese State fans show 
up by the thousands to each 
home game. Texas A&M 
fans practice chants at the 
football stadium the night be- 
fore each home game. What 
do we have to do? 

This school must learn 
to pull together as one and 
support our teams. I was 
ashamed to be a student of 
this institution last Thursday. 
I just don't understand why 
no one wants to show up to 
the games. 

Now, I know that I am on 
my soapbox but can we not 
seriously fill up the stands for 
at least ONE game. It really 
grinds my gears to be a part 
of a school with no fan base. 

I am not just talking to the 
students. I know of faculty 
members who refuse to sup- 
port athletics by not attending 
games. What kind of exam- 
ple are the faculty members 
setting for the students? It 
is just amazing how people 
can support one school but 
not the one that they attend or 
teach at. 

We have several home 
games coming up within the 
next couple of weeks. If you 
do not know when they are 
then log on to nsudemons. 
com and check the schedules. 
Make plans to attend a game 
and as always, please wear 
Demon colors! 

As for the LSU game this 
weekend, if you are an NSU 
student and you are wearing 
LSU gear, then all I can say is 
shame on you. I really hope 
our fans show up w ith their 
Demon pride showing strong. 
Let's go support our football 
team this weekend! Fork 
'Em Dons! 




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Weekly SUDOKU 



by Linda Thistle 



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9 








3 




8 








6 


2 






2 






9 








1 


6 






4 




7 






8 






5 








2 






9 


8 








4 






3 






4 


9 


8 






1 







Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way 
that each row across, each column down and 
each small 9-box square contains all of the 
numbers from one to nine. 



DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: 



* Moderate * * Challenging 
★ ★ * HOO BOY! 

© 201 1 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



It's back to school time: Bored as all get out 




I 



t is often 
stated 
among 
students of 
orthwest- 
ern State 
University 
hat there is 
nothing to 
TomLawler pursue ai far 
Staff Columnist as recr eation 
is concerned. I could not 
disagree any more with these 
folk! Perhaps you are easily 
bored, but I think you lack 
imagination, creativity and an 
adventurous spirit. 

First and foremost, there is 
a large and imposing institu- 
tion located on University 
Parkway to which all who 
read this article are bound in 
some way, shape or form. The 
university claims over 100 
recognized student organi- 
zations to satisfy the needs 



of its students. There are an 
organization for everything 
from student government to 
bass fishing. 

Heck, even if you do not 
like the provided offerings, 
you are more than welcome 
to create your own RSO with 
your pals. There are a whole 
range of Greek organiza- 
tions to be involved with to 
some extent and furthermore, 
there are plenty of venues in \ 
which the athletic department 
represents us as students and 
faculty. If they do not have 
home functions^ tia particu- 
lar week, have a roSd trip to 
whatever hole-in-the-wall 
town happens to be hosting ' 
our fine NSU Demons. Not 
to mention the Creative and 
Performing Art students are 
always throwing something 
together that can be gawked at 
or listened to. So that looming 



group of buildings has loads 
of activities. I can assure you 
of that! 

Secondly, the city of 
Natchitoches hosts many 
things to occupy yourself 
with. There are at least six 
bars to frequent on the week- 
ends and a wide variety of 
fast food dining ^.vperiences. 
Why not compare who has 
the better frozen treats be- 
tween Sonic and DQ? There 
is a museum and other his- 
toric fixtures at the Ft. St 
Jean Baptiste National Site. 
Natchitoches possesses an 
aquarium and who could 
leave out Front St. with all 
of its stores, cafes, and art 
studios. I have recently gotten 
wind of a Natchitoches rugby 
team getting a start, too. 

Finally, for the more 
adventurous of you, there is 
Kisatchie National Forest 



(one of my favorite Natchi- 
toches related activities). Here 
you can find hiking, biking, 
fishing, swimming, camping, 
and horse riding. Also, locat- 
ed beyond the city limits are 
plantations along Cane River, 
which goes on past South St. 
Bridge for some 30 miles or 
so. This makes a terrific drive 
for a Sunday afternoon. Yet 
even further, maybe only one 
hour away is Toledo Bend and 
all of its beauty. 

This is about half of the 
iceberg as far as Natchitoches 
recreation is concerned. 

So if I can fill up an entire 
article about the things to do 
in this part of the 3 1 8 area 
code, you should be able to 
have an active and illustri- 
ous social life while at NSU. 
After all, this is college and 
everything about it is at your 
discretion! 




_____ — . — — — — .■.■ — ■■■■■■ — ,■■■,■■■,■ ■■■■, „ ■■■■ — •_■••- — 

I t t in* 

CurrentSauc 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Hunter Bower 
Opuiion Editor 




Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Shana Lee 
Sauce Reporter 



Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



Welcome Back 



o 
I 

5V 




Join the effort to help 
turn NSU into a 
TOBACCO-FREE campus 



Fresh Campus Re-El ectionsl 11 
Tuesday, September 6, 2011 at 
5:00pm in room 221 -Student Union 



Find us on Facebook: Fresh Campus at NSU 



Living in 
a world 
(we didn't 
make) 



lO ur 

I genera- 
tion has 
ho identity. 
[And by our 

[genera- 
tion, I mean 
kollege- 
aged stu- 
dents born 



Charles Crain 

Guest Columnist in the 80s 

and early 90s. We are now 
the age that advertisers most 
value, and we supposedly 
control what products are put 
on the shelves. But what have 
we contributed? 

Let's take a look at the 
current music scene. Lady 
Gaga, the biggest pop star to 
emerge since Britney Spears, 
borrows heavily from Ma- 
donna. With her outrageous 
outfits, secular dance music 
and controversial imagery. 
Although she is talented 
and credited for reviving the 
fledgling music business, 
there is constantly a "been 
there, done that" quality to 
her work. 

Now, the biggest artist of 
201 1 is a throwback female 
singer named Adele. She has 
shifted 3 million copies of 
her album this year, and her 
single "Rolling in the Deep" 
is the biggest-selling single of 
the year. Adele is cut from the 
Motown crop, reminding us 
of old-school Aretha Franklin, 
Etta James and Janis Joplin. 
What has she brought to the 
table? No one can deny her 
talent, but borrowing from 
iconic performers cannot be 
seen as a forward push. 

The movie business is 
even less inspired. The latest 
Transformers film, Dark of 
the Moon, has raked in a bil- 
lion dollars at the global box 
office. The entire franchise 
is based on a brand of 1980s 
toys, surely the best example 
of generational branding. 

What about The 
Smurfs? Alvin and the Chip- 
munks? All are borrowed 
from the 1980's and modern- 
ized for today's audience. 
Where are the original ideas? 
Why are we borrowing so 
heavily from "the good ole 
days?" 

We live in a retro 
culture. We rely so heavily on 
how great things were when 
we were younger that we try 
to recreate those feelings. 
We should focus on establish- 
ing our own popular culture, 
something that future genera- 
tions will want to emulate and 
play with. 

Of course, I could be 
misguided, and future pop 
stars might be harking back 
to the days of Lady Gaga for 
their inspiration. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
September 7, 201 1 



Quarterback suspended indefinitely 



Peveto sites conduct on sidelines reason for suspension 



Courtesy of Sports Info. 

Northwestern State junior 
quarterback Paul Har- 
ris, who has been the 
Demons' starter since the last 
four games of his true fresh- 
man season in 2009, has been 
suspended indefinitely due 
to conduct detrimental to the 
team, NSU head coach Brad- 
ley Dale Peveto said Friday. 

Harris did not return to 
the Demons' season open- 
ing game Thursday night 
after the second series of the 
contest. His conduct on the 
sideline led Peveto to bench 
him for the remainder of the 
half. Further behavior issues 
during halftime prompted 
Peveto to direct Harris to put 
on his street clothes and leave 
NSU's locker room and side- 
line. Harris watched the rest 
of the game with his parents 
in the stands, cheering for the 
Demons. 

Junior college transfer 
Brad Henderson, who was 
already slated to play every 
third series unless Harris and 
the Demons' offense were 
particularly effective, took 
over as the first-team quar- 
terback. In his first Division I 
action, Henderson completed 
a school record 1 3 consecu- 
tive passes while sparking 
Northwestern back from a 




photo by Gary Hardamon 

Paul Harris looks for an open reciever in one of his last game as a Demon. Coach Peveto suspended Harris from the team after Thursday's game 



17-0 halftime deficit to a 
24-23 win over Delta State at 
NSU's Turpin Stadium. 

Peveto informed the team 
of the disciplinary action 
early Friday afternoon, and 
said neither he or anyone else 
with the squad will discuss 
the situation further. 

"It's a family matter and 
we're keeping this within our 
family," he said. "I'm very 



proud of how our team rallied 
around Brad Henderson and 
how he led our offense in a 
winning performance. We're 
proud to have come from 
behind to beat a very, very 
talented Delta State team and 
we're excited anticipating our 
game next Saturday at LSU." 

Henderson led the De- 
mons to scores on four of 
their first five series after half- 



time, finishing 13 of 14 pass- 
ing for 210 yards including a 
32-yard touchdown to senior 
tight end Justin Aldredge. 
Henderson added a net of 1 1 
yards rushing, gaining 37 but 
losing 26 on four sacks. 

The comeback victory 
was the second-largest win- 
ning rally by the Demons in 
their Division I history, dating 
back to 1977. NSU won its 



2005 season opener at Louisi- 
ana-Monroe 27-23, overcom- 
ing a 23-0 halftime deficit. 

Henderson (5-11,210) 
was an honorable mention 
junior college All-America 
quarterback last year at East 
Mississippi Community Col- 
lege, throwing for 2,763 yards 
and 26 touchdowns while 
completing 59.8 percent of his 
388 pass attempts, averaging 



276 yards passing per game. 
He is a Starkville, Miss., na- 
tive who played for Starkville 
High School. 

Redshirt freshman Don 
Canyon (6-2, 240, Dallas- 
Lincoln) will move into the 
backup role at quarterback 
for NSU, with true freshman 
Grant Chiasson (6-0, 190, 
Thibodaux-E.D. White) as the 
third-team quarterback, said 
offensive coordinator Todd 
Cooley. 

Harris threw for 29 yards 
on 4 of 6 aim in his participa- 
tion on nine plays on NSU's 
first two possessions Thurs- 
day night as the Demons net- 
ted 1 7 yards, punting twice. 

Harris, a Baton Rouge- 
Tara product, ranks 1 0th in 
school history with 3,628 ca- 
reer total offensive yards and 
is also 10th in career passing 
yardage (2,828 yards). He 
was a second-team Preseason 
All-Southland Conference 
selection this summer. He has 
started 14 games, nine last 
season when his 1,821 pass- 
ing yards were the seventh 
best season total in school 
history. 

Ironically, Henderson 
broke a consecutive comple- 
tions record Harris set last 
November when he hit 1 1 
straight passes in a win at 
Southeastern Louisiana. 



NSU or LSU? 



Who are you going to support? 




Matt Fowler 

Guest 
Columnist 



T 



o steal a 
line from 
Hunter 

Bower, "You know what really 
grinds my gears"? To be hon- 
est he probably stole that from 
someone else. 

This week is one of the big- 
gest weeks of the year for our 
school in terms of athletics. 
Not necessarily for our foot- 
ball team, but our campus has 
definitely had a buzz about the 
event of this week. 

We will travel down to 
Baton Rouge and play the LSU 
Tigers in Death Valley Satur- 
day at 7 p.m. 

Now I want to get to what 
grinds my gears. LSU is obvi- 
ously the flagship school of our 
state, and people around the 
state stand strong behind them, 
and I will be honest with you, I 
like that. 

My question is this: Why 
are people from this campus 
more sold out to that school 
when they pay their money 
(part of which goes to our ath- 



letics) to this campus? 

Now with that said, I do 
not want everybody to mistake 
what I am saying. Trust me, I 
am a huge LSU fan when they 
are not facing my beloved De- 
mons, but when students from 
this school have more LSU 
gear than NSU in their closets I 
feel that is a problem. 

I can already see what is 
going to happen at the game 
Saturday too. There is going 
to be NSU students and fans 
wearing that other school's 
clothes, which is just wrong. 

Why? Why? Why? 

As referenced earlier, you 
pay your dollars to this cam- 
pus, so why would you not 
stand behind the money you 
spend. 

What really gets on my 
nerves is that I have heard 
some of our very own athletes 
say they would be wearing 
LSU or even gear to support 
both LSU and NSU. 

That brings me to two more 
points on my soapbox: 

1. You are an athlete of 
NSU. You are a DEMON. 
Your job is to compete for your 
school in your sport, and then 
support your peers in their 



sports. Why would you support 
another school's athletes? 

2. (now referencing every- 
one) For those of you who are 
planning to wear both schools' 
gear, please just wear LSU's 
stuff. 

I would rather have nobody 
than a lot offence riders" 
because all you are doing is 
looking for a way out. 

If we do well then you will 
take the glory for support- 
ing our school, but you know 
what... YOU DIDN'T SUP- 
PORT OUR SCHOOL!! 

You are not supporting 
either school when you wear 
gear for both schools. And if 
we do poorly then you can 
just say I was going for LSU 
anyway. 

I hope that I have not of- 
fended anybody with this col- 
umn, but it is something I feel 
very strongly. 

So please, if you are going 
to that game as a NSU student, 
faculty, or fan wear something 
orange that says "Demons" on 
it. Be a true fan and student 
and support your football team 
and staff that have worked hard 
to prepare for this week. 



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Demon soccer split weekend matches: 
Danku named SLC player of the week 



Shana Lee 

Sauce Reporter 

The Lady Demon's soccer 
team hit the road this 
past week and came 
back with a solid win over 
Prairie View. 

Not only did NSU battle 
the Lady Panthers but 35 mph 
wind as well. 

Sophomore-midfielder 
Yanci Johnson gave NSU 
the edge they needed to win 
with her three shots. Johnson 
scored the first goal of the 
game five minutes in when 
Meghan Hunter set Johnson 
up with an on target pass. 

Early in the second half 
Prairie View scored tying the 
game 1-1. 

Head Coach Jimmy 
Mitchell said, "It was disap- 
pointing to let them back in 
the game like that, but we 
regrouped and I feel we did 



Upcoming home 
soccer matches 

Tulsa 9/11/11 2:00 p.m 
Southern Miss. 9/16/1 1 7:00 p.m. 
Texas Southern 9/23/1 1 7:00 p.m. 
Southeastern La 9/30/1 1 7:00 p.m. 



that very well." 

Johnson went on to score 
again with the help of fresh- 
man forward Alex Peterman 
in the 4 1 st minute of the 
game. 

Sophomore-goalkeeper 
Jessica Danku and junior- 
goalkeeper Sam Furlow both 
saw some quality play time 
and each collected two saves. 

The Lady Demons outshot 
the Lady Panthers 23-5 in the 
game. However, the winning 
streak for the Lady Demons 
came to an end on Sunday 
afternoon when Houston Bap- 
tist outscored NSU 2-0. 

This lost dropped the 
Lady Demons to 3-2 and 
Houston Baptist improved to 
3-3. 

The Lady Demons faced 
brisk wind caused by Tropi- 
cal Storm Lee which explains 
why NSU was outshot 9-7 
and only one of NSU's seven 



shots was on goal. 

The game went into 
halftime being 0-0, but in the 
72nd minute Ariel Rodrigues 
of Houston Baptist scored to 
put the Huskies up 1-0. 

Twelve minutes later, 
Mandi Folger put the game 
out of reach for the Lady De- 
mons making the score 2-0. 

NSU goalkeeper Jessica 
Danku played the whole game 
and faced five shots with two 
of those slipping past. 

Her performance in this 
game and others led the SLC 
to name Danku as the SLC 
Goalkeeper of the Week. 

The Lady Demons will be 
on the road again Friday as 
they face Jackson State and 
will return to the Demon Soc- 
cer Complex Sunday, Sept 1 1 , 
against Tulsa. 

The team expects to 
bounce back from the loss 
against Houston Baptist 



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Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, September 14, 201 1 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 3 



Northwestern has fall enrollment of 9,191 



NSU News Bureau 

Fall 2011 enrollment at Northwest- 
ern State University stands at 9,191 
students, and includes an increase in 
first-time freshmen for the university. 

Along with slightly more freshman than 
2010, Northwestern also saw a rise despite 
an increase in admissions criteria, which 
also resulted in a higher than state of Louisi- 
ana average ACT for the freshman class. 

The university increased the number of 
first time freshmen by 8 1 despite an increase 
in admissions criteria. 

Northwestern also increased the number 
of transfer students and continuing graduate 
students. 

"We are pleased to have a strong fall en- 
rollment figure," Dr. Webb, NSU president, 
said. 

"That is the result of hard work by the 
Office of University Recruiting and all the 
faculty and staff who reach out to prospec- 



tive students year round 

"We are also seeing the benefits of the 
effort our faculty makes in working closely 
with our students to keep them on track to- 
wards graduation." 

Typical of the new students enrolling this 
fall is Travis Story, who made his college de- 
cision the first time he set foot on the North- 
western's main campus in Natchitoches. 

A freshman psychology and humanities 
and social thought major in the Louisiana 
Scholars' College, Story visited Northwest- 
ern last fall and began planning to enroll. 

A resident of Mabank, Texas, Story wasn't 
familiar with Northwestern until his high 
school band director brought him to a col- 
lege fair in Piano, Texas. 

"I got there and talked with someone from 
Northwestern and I became interested in the 
university," Story said. 
"Once I came on campus for Scholars' Day, 
everything clicked for me. 

"Everyone in Scholars' College was out- 



going. I sat in on classes and observed the 
discussion that went on and knew this was 
something I wanted to be part of." 

The Scholars' College emphasizes smaller 
discussion-style classes with heavy student 
involvement, which appeals to Story. 

"The classes are challenging and I like 
that," Story said. 

"Everyone in the class takes part in dis- 
cussion. The faculty are involved with the 
students. They are willing to talk with you 
on a one-on-one basis and provide a unique 
environment." 

Story is a member of the color guard in the 
"Spirit of Northwestern" Marching Band. 

"Being part of the band is a lot of work. 
It's fun getting out there to practice and see- 
ing a show develop," he said. 

"We are like a family. It is a great way to 
meet people and be part of an organization 
that is respected around the country." 

Another area of strength for Northwest- 
ern, on-line enrollment, was a robust. 



This fall's enrollment includes 3,787 stu- 
dents who take electronic classes by the In- 
ternet, compressed v ideo or desktop video. 

Northwestern was the first to make com- 
plete degree programs available on-line 
among Louisiana universities. 

The University remains the leader with 
29 degree or certification programs available 
through its global campus, eNSU. 

"The ability to take online classes has 
made it easier for me to work toward a col- 
lege degree," Fred Denham III of Natchi- 
toches, who is pursuing a bachelor's degree 
in criminal justice, said. 

"I had taken classes in the 90s and about 
two years ago, I decided to go back. 

"Taking classes online is convenient and 
allows me to do my work without the same 
time constraint." 

Denham, an investigator in the Natchi- 
toches Parish Sheriff's Office high-tech 
crime unit, has also started taking graduate 
courses toward a master's in adult education 



with a concentration in homeland security. 

"The courses have been very beneficial in 
my work," said Denham, who has 13 years 
of law enforcement experience. 

"I have learned new concepts and a num- 
ber of new things I use in my work. I have 
found my communications skills have im- 
proved." 

Denham said he's found Northwestern's 
faculty to be responsive to his needs as a stu- 
dent. 

"The faculty are very active in the classes, 
making sure assignments are posted and that 
students are participating in discussions," 
Denham said. 

"They are responsive and get back in touch 
with you quickly when you have a question." 



For the rest of the story and other 
NSU informaiton, visit the Current 
Sauce website at www.nsucurrent- 
sauce.com. 




NSU receives grant 
for alcohol awareness 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 

More than 4,000 NSU fans cheered on the Demon football team this past Saturday in Death Valley for the NSU vs. LSU game. 
NSU students, faculty, staff and alumni made the trip to Baton Rouge, LA to show their support through tailgating and cheering. 
It was the 11th time in history the two footballs teams faced each other. This was the first time Coach Peveto faced his former 
team where he was an assistant for the 2007 National Championship winners. More pictures of NSU students at the football 
game can be seen on the Life page or at the Current Sauce website: www.nsucurrentsauce.com. 



NSU Police 
Blotter 

Reports from the NSU 
police station from 
Sept 7 - 13 

September 7 

8: 16 a.m. - Call from the dance studio 
requesting an officer due to an injury 

September 8 

1 :22 p.m. - Complaint of two suspicious 
males at University Place II on second 
floor wearing white shirt and khaiki 
pants/blue shirt and not sure of pants 

1 :54 p.m. - Advised one of the boys are 
juveniles and made attempt to contact 
mother at work - unsuccessful. They were 
advised not to come back on campus. 
Grandmother has custody of both boys. 



September 9 

3:38 p.m. - Russell Hall alarm is sounding 
off and lights flashing 

September 10 

9:53 a.m. - Fire tech is here for Russell fire 
alarm 

10:11 a.m. - alarm is off at Russell Hall 

2:25 p.m. - Police escort requested from 
business parking lost to University Place II 

2:45 p.m. - There was a note on the students 
door 'get a life ' 

4:06 pm. - Natchitoches Parish Hospital 
down at soccer field. Helicopter "Life Air" 
requested 

4:19 p.m. - Call from Natchitoches Fire 
Department, that they would have a unit on 
scene to give "Life Air " landing zone 

4:58 p.m. - "Life Air" arrives, leaving the 
scene/transporting 



7:37 p.m. - University Place I, Buidling 
2, Room 2302 was broke into, $30.00 was 
taken 

September 11 

5:15 pm. - Call University Columns stolen 
bike 

9:33 p.m. - Library staff request a police 
escort 

September 12 

1 1 :36 a.m. - Injury at Iberville, female red 
hair. She is not sure if she wants EMTyet. 

1 1 :42 a.m. - Student request EMT 

1 1 :50 a.m. - EMT arrives 

September 13 

11:12 a.m. - All units go in reference to 
possible theft at South Hall 

1 :38 p.m. - Injury in Student Union. Room 
30H, EMTenroute 



NSU News Bureau 

Northwestern State University received 
a $43,600 grant from the Louisiana 
Highway Safety Commission to as- 
sist in funding a campus alcohol awareness 
campaign, according to Dr. Chris Maggio, 
dean of students and assistant provost for 
student life. The grant covers the 2011-12 
and 201 2- 1 3 budget years. 

This is the third time Northwestern has re- 
ceived this grant. Last year, NSU sponsored 
programs 
including a 
Safe Spring 
Break 
Campaign 
to encour- 
age stu- 
dents to 
make good 
choices 
while on 
spring 
break. 

Maggio 
said North- 
western 

students are a vital part of the alcohol edu- 
cation effort through a Recognized Student 
Organization, BACCHUS (Boosting Alco- 
hol Consciousness Concerning the Health of 
University Students). 

He credited NSU counselor Kristi Simms 




with leading the University's initiative in 
this area by setting up BACCHUS and work- 
ing closely with students. 

"Research shows that when talking about 
making decisions on things such as using 
alcohol, peers can have a powerful impact," 
Simms said. 

"We will be training students to take a 
larger role in this area by training them in 
the areas of bystander intervention, alcohol 
education and basic communication skills." 

According to Simms, Northwestern plans 
to use peer educators in freshman orientation 
classes beginning in the fall 2012 semester. 

The grant pays travel for NSU staff and 
student officers of BACCHUS to attend the 
organization's national assembly this fall. 

The meeting includes educational ses- 
sions, health issue events and programs to 
provide participants with the latest informa- 
tion on developing a successful alcohol edu- 
cation program. 

"Talking with and meeting with peers 
and professionals from other universities 
is invaluable and will help us develop new 
ideas," Simms said. 

"Other universities have told me they 
admire what Northwestern is doing, and at- 
tending this conference keeps us informed 
about other successful programs." 

Simms said membership in Northwest- 
em's BACCHUS doubled last year and is 
expected to grow this fall. 



Plans to clean up Cane River 

River Patrol's clean-up initiative, according 
toe Steven Gruesbveck, director of NSU's 
Office of Service-Learning and greeNSU. 

"Under the direction of professors of ar- 
cheology, anthropology, biology and ecol- 
ogy, our volunteers will clean up along the 
riverbed and seawall of the Cane River," 
Gruesbeck said. 

"Along the way, trash and recyclables will 
be separated and specialized training and at- 
tention will be given to protect and preserve 
unexpected items of historical relevance," 
Gruesbeck said. 

"The City of Natchitoches will provide 
trash bags and rubber gloves and NSU is pro- 
viding T-shirts and bottled water to the vol- 
unteers. City crews will remove the debris 
collected from the river," Courtney Homsby, 
director of programming and promotions for 
the City of Natchitoches, said. 



NSU News Bureau 

Students, faculty, staff and volunteers 
from Northwestern State University, 
the Louisiana School for Math, Sci- 
ence and the Arts and the National Center for 
Preservation Technology and Training will 
partner with the City of Natchitoches/Keep 
Natchitoches Beautiful to help clean Cane 
River Lake within the City of Natchitoches. 

The clean-up will take place from 1-5 
p.m. Friday, Sept 23 with a focus on the east 
and west banks of Cane River Lake within 
the downtown area, from St. Maurice Lane 
to the Church Street Bridge and possibly be- 
yond. 

Faculty and students from NSU's College 
of Science and Technology, College of Arts 
and Letters and Louisiana Scholars' College 
will partner w ith other volunteers in the Cane 



Index 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 


2 Life 


99768° 


92760° 


89761° 


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3 Opinions 
















4 Sports 








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Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student. nsula.edu 
September 14, 2011 



NSU sororities recruit 



Taylor Graves 

Life Editor 

This week, the women of 
NSU will hold sorority re- 
cruitment beginning this Fri- 
day through Sunday. 

Registation for those interested 
in joining a sorority ends this Friday 
at 5 p.m online at greeks.nsula.edu. 

"Sorority recruitment is a great 
time for any girl who is interested 
in what sorority life has to offer. To 
be able to visit all four of the CPC 
sororities on our campus and find 
the one that best fits them," Han- 
nah Thomas. Alpha Sigma Alpha 
president, said. 

"It gives them more of an idea of 
the benefits each one has to offer," 
she added. 

During sorority recruitment, pro- 
spective members will meet women 
from all of the Panhellenic houses 
on campus. 

These houses include: Alpha 
Omicron Pi, Alpha Sigma Alpha, 
Phi Mu and Sigma Sigma Sigma. 
Each of these sororities will show 
the potential members what their 
sorority has to offer. 

Sorority recruitment is not only 
about women finding the right 
house to join, but to reach out to 
NSU women to join Greek life in 
general. 

"At the end of the day, we want 
all girls to be Greek," Vice Presi- 
dent Maegan Morace, College of 
Panhellenic Council, said. 



"it is not just about one house; it is 
about the overall Greek community 
here at NSU." 

No matter what sorority a 
woman chooses to join, all of the 
sororities pride themselves on simi- 
lar qualities. 

"Sororities are so much more 
than what meets the eye." Morace 
said. "They have high GPAs. are in- 
volved on campus, raise money for 
their philanthropies, develop lasting 
leadership qualities and in turn be- 
come better people in society." 

Throughout recruitment, each 
sorority will reach out to prospec- 
tive members in a different way. 

"I believe the best way to recruit 
a person is to be your true self," 
Thomas said. "1 encourage all of the 
members of my sorority to just be 
open and welcoming and everything 
that is them." 

President of Alpha Omicron Phi, 
Chelsea Giles, said, "I plan on let- 
ting girls see how much a sorority 
helps to improve you as an indi- 
vidual." 

No matter which sorority a 
woman chooses, every sorority has 
an impact on its members during 
the growing years of college life 
and after. 

These girls get me through 
the roller coaster that college life 
can be," Brooke Neilsen, Phi Mu 
Recruiting Chair, said. "Without my 
sisters, I wouldn't be the person I 
am." 

Lindsay Rolling, Sigma Sigma 



Sigma Recruiting Chair, feels 
similar. "1 have learned more about 
myself and gained many leadership 
skills that I know I will employ ev- 
eryday once I enter the real world." 
Rolling said. 

Sorority life also taught Giles 
and Thomas important lessons. 

"Being a member of a soror- 
ity has taught me that it is okay to 
reach outside your comfort zone 
and meet new people and try new 
things," Giles said. 

Thomas said: "After joining, I've 
realized it's more than just cute 
shirts and fun times. It teaches you 
responsibility and leadership. I re- 
ally see myself as more of a leader 
and have gained more confidence in 
myself from it." 



Sorority recruitment 
schedule 
Open House 

Friday, Sept 16 
Student Union Ballroom 
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. 

Philanthropy Day 

Saturday, Sept 1 7 
Student Union Ballroom 
9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 

Prefrential Tea 

Sunday, Sept 18 
Student Union Ballroom 
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 



@ NORTHWESTERN 



STATE UNIVERSITY 




Upcoming Events 

SGA/SAB/Honor 
Court Voting 

Open to all students 
September 14-15 
Student Union Lobby and 
Iberville Dining Hall 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Also vote online at 
secure.nsula.edu/SGAVoting 

FYI Challenge 

SAB event 
Freshman Only 
September 15 
Student Union Ballroom 
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

New Faces 

Creative and Performing Arts 
event 

Open to all students 
September 19 

A. A. Fredricks Auditorium 
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

Demon Scavenger 
Extravaganza 

SAB event 
All Students Invited 
September 20 
Kyser Brickway 

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. 

Miss LOB 
Informationals 

SAB Event 
All Interested Women 
September 13, 15, 21, 27 and 
October 6 

Student Union Ballroom 

6 p.m. 




'Lifted Voices' sing out for Haiti 



Photo by Katie Beverly / Current Sauce 



The Office of Cultural Diversity hosted "A Night in Haiti" to raise awareness and money for the reflief ef- 
forts in Haiti due to the recent earthquake. Lifted Voices performed to show their support. Guest speakers 
Van Kyzar, Natchitoches district attorney, and Dr. Curt Phifer, biology professor, gave lectors to encourage 
students and residents to donate to the cause. 



Checking 




Low Fees 

REALLY, THEY'RE JUST THE BEGINNING 
OF HOW WE HELP YOU THRIVE 



La Capi tol 

^ | , l<MW ^— — wm ^^^^ 

FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 

TOGETHER WE THRIVE 



1961 



311 Keyser Ave • 926 University Pkwy • 800.522.2748 / www.lacapfcu.org 

Federally Insured by NCUA 



08/11 



Demons invadeTiger Land 



m 



if \ ff*V^ Wmrf' . 4/^a2> <*£ . +a .Wj* 



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Photo by Gary Hardamon 
The Spirit of Northwestern plays the fight song as the football team runs out onto the field. 




Submitted photo 

Phi Mu fraternity members tailgate at a site provided by the Alumni 
Association. 




Submitted photo 
Demon faithful enjoy their first 
NSU vs. LSU football game in Ti- 
ger Stadium. Over 4,000 Demon 
fans made the trip to Baton Rouge 
to cheer on NSU. See the Sports 
page for full coverage of the game. 

Just Like Cats & Dogs Da« t. puk* 



F 



Photo by Chris Reich 
NSU students rented a charter bus for the football game against LSU. 



HONEY. I APPRECIATE YOU LETTIN6 ME SLEEP IN... 
FUNNY THOUGH. IT WAS THE ONE M0RNIN6 I WAS 
SUPPOSE TO PICK UP MY MOTHER AT THE AIRPORT. 





Opinions 



Hunter Bower 
Opinions Editor 
hbowerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 
September 14, 2011 



Where were you on that September day? 




I 



Hunter Bower 

Opinions Editor 

can re- 
member it 
like it was 
yesterday. I 
was sitting in 
my 5 th grade 
social studies 
class when 
the principal 
came over the 
loud speaker 
and announced that terrorists had 
attacked the World Trade Towers in 
New York City. 

My first reaction to the an- 
nouncement was, "Wow, why would 
anyone want to do that?" 

We stayed in the same class 
all day as we watched the events 
unfold. I can remember watching 
people who were stranded in the 
World Trade Towers waving shirts 
for someone to come rescue them 
while watching others jump out of 
the windows to avoid being burned 
alive. Words could not express how 
I felt as I watched these people die 
right in front of my eyes. 

As we watched the two towers 
burn, we were notified that planes 
had crashed into the Pentagon and 
in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylva- 
nia. It seemed like a dream. I had 
never heard of a terrorist attack or 
knew who Osama Bin Laden was. 

We turned our attention back to 
New York City and watched as fire- 
fighters and other emergency teams 
rushed into the two towers to rescue 



Campus Talk: Students comment on their reactions to 9/11 



"/ was in my 8th grade English class 
t hen I heard about 9/11. By the time 
J got to a TV. I saw the second plane 
hit. I asked everyone, 'What? Is that 
i replay? '. When I realized that it 
>vas the second plane, I couldn 't be- 
'ieve it. " 
Patrick Reed, 
senior business major 

"We've come so far as a country 
iince the 9/11 tragedy. I remem- 
ber it as if it were yesterday. We 
A'ill all remember this because it 
has changed our entire nation 's 
perspective on terrorism - it CAN 
happen to us. " 
\lison Roberts, 
senior graphic arts major 



"lean 't believe it's been 10 years. 
It weirds me out that there are 
people alive today who don 't know 
or weren 't alive then to see it. I was 
in the fifth grade when it happened. 
Our class was in the library and the 
librarian turned the TV on to CNN. 
1 remember not understanding what 
was going on. I can 't believe how 
far we have come since then, and I 
can 't be live how far we have to go. " 
Randa Lopez, 
junior English major 

"When I found out about the terror- 
ist attack on 9/11, 1 was in elemen- 
tary school, and my dad was sched- 
uled for a business flight that same 
day. I remember my mom called the 



school saying that he was okay and 
he never got on his plane due to the 
cancellations. I remember thinking 
how easily it could have been for 
our family to be directly affected by 
this attack. My heart goes out to all 
those affected by the 9/11 attakes. " 
Caitlin Guillory, 
sophomore business major 

"I was at East Natchitoches 
Elementary in Mrs. Hall's fourth 
grade class. It makes me really sad 
to think about all the daddies that 
little girls had to grow up without 
cuz i 'm a daddy 's girl. " 
Grace Shaw, 

junior criminal justice major 



the people inside. Then, out of no- 
where, the first tower collapsed. 

I was so shocked over what I 
had just seen. There were so many 
people inside that did not even have 
a chance to escape. 

I began to think about the fire- 
fighters who died trying to rescue 
the people trapped in the towers. It 
was something that was hard for me 
to take in. 

My dad is a volunteer firefighter 
back in my hometown. For years, 
I had seen him walk into burning 
buildings and come back out after 
he had defeated the fiery flames. 
My dad has always been my hero, 
but the first time that I watched him 
come out of a burning house, just 
made me idolize him more. 



My dad has always been Super- 
man to me and even though he has 
encountered problems in fires, he 
has always come out. 

I sat there in my chair and 
thought about how there were fire- 
fighters that went into the buildings 
and never came back out. 

Most of the firemen were some- 
one's hero, whether it be a child or 
a person they ran into on the street. 

I could not wait for school to 
end so I could get home and see my 
dad. I was worried that something 
happened to him. 

At 5 p.m., my dad finally walked 
into the door, and I couldn't help 
but thank God that he had come 
home safely. 



We take a lot of things for 
granted in life. Most of the people 
that walked into the towers that day 
didn't know that it would be the 
last time they would ever see their 
families. 

We must learn to cherish the 
people in our lives and never forget 
the ones who sacrificed their lives 
that day. 

I want to thank all of the firemen, 
paramedics, our armed forces and 
anyone else who helps protect our 
nation. I cannot express in enough 
words how much you all mean to 
me. It is people like you who help 
make this world better everyday. 
May we never forget. 

I love you dad. 




Currents auce 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Hunter Bower 
Opinion Editor 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Shana Lee 
Sauce Reporter 

Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 

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Rants: Natchitoches 
'Second World' city 




C 



Tom H. Lawler 

Staff Columnist 

oukl 
any- 
thing 
go right last 
week? 
It seemed 
■if like every - 
^m^jtMr w here one 
HI looked there 
was one thing 
or another 

failing in Natchitoches and NSU. 
These aforementioned failings gave 
me the ev idence and the idea (but 
unfortunately not the power) to 
downgrade the city of Natchitoches 
to Second World status, which is 
not so bad, really. It still is not Third 
World, though that may be forth- 
coming. 

Chief among my complaints is 
the failing of our water system. To 
those of you w ho are new on cam- 
pus or from somewhere else with a 
reliable water system, this happens 
every now and then here. Boiling 
all of your water for a day should 
not be considered a hassle if things 
were different. If this were truly the 
First World, it seems as if the basic 
goods and services provided to us 
would arrive consistently, reliably 
and harmlessly. 

Sure, anomalies occur and there 
are gaffes abound in this mighty 
town 'that doth stride the Cane like 
a colossus'. How hard is it to disin- 
fect water? It seems the hardest part 
is choosing which method: boiling, 
chlorine, UV light etc. 

Not only does Natchitoches 
straddle an oxbow lake, it is bor- 
dered on the w est by Sibley Lake 
and east by the Red River. Further- 
more, it is Louisiana; water is not 
far even in severe drought 

Many of you cried "conspiracy" 
as if this were some way to keep 
our long bisecting duck pond full 
of water in the hallowed name of 
tourism. 

I oppose, for these warnings 



(like I said) are not new to Natchi- 
toches. 

Other complaints are the weather 
sirens that have for the past few 
years warned me to seek shelter 
from the 5mph winds (and did 
rightly sound T.S. Lee) or tornados 
that never happen. Yet, could you 
imagine if there was no Purple Alert 
in place for the forest fire, tropical 
storms, droughts and boil adviso- 
ries? There would be chaos and 
calamity. 

It would appear that this town 
wants to keep you afraid, or at the 
very least informed of things to be 
afraid of, much like the totalitarian 
regimes of the Second World (no- 
tice how I came back to that). 

Lastly, it seems as if practical 
technology has still not found itself 
at Northwestern State, although, 
among my three roommates there 
are three iPhones, an iPad and two 
working computers. 

However, the registers at the 
cafeterias mysteriously shut down, 
there is always spotty cell phone 
coverage and the professors sel- 
dom seem to post stuff to Moodle 
without difficulty due to technical 
glitches. 

So yes, you may have the latest 
smartphone, but trying to send an 
email to a professor or check as- 
signments can be distressing. 

So why not go ahead and give 
Natchitoches a downgrade to Sec- 
ond World status? 

Have we too much pride? 

Is the company of Hungary, 
Cuba and Mongolia just to irritable? 

We have two options: either we 
can make this a better place to live, 
or we can continue to be satis- 
fied with the semi-functionality of 
Natchitoches that we have become 
accustomed to. 

For me, I hope the latter will 
come to pass. I could get familiar 
with hav ing fewer headaches. 



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The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
September 14, 2011 




Tulsa dominates Lady Demons on the pitch 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Demon quarterback Brad Henderson escapes the pocket to complete a pass to a receiver in 49-3 loss. 

Tigers wear down Demons 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

The difference of talent was 
evident Saturday night as the 
Demons suffered its first loss 
of the season against the nation's 
second-ranked college football 
team at Tiger Stadium in Baton 
Rouge. 

The 49-3 loss squared NSU at 
1-1 while LSU continued its climb 
up the BCS ladder. Tiger Stadium 
was jam-packed with 92, 405 
people, including more than 4,000 
NSU fans. 

"That is definitely the number 
one team in the country. They are 
a great football team," Demons' 
coach Bradley Dale Peveto said. 
"They were pretty impressive on 
television and they are even more 



impressive in person. 

This was coach Peveto 's first 
time facing LSU since joining the 
Demon football program. He was an 
assistant for the Tigers when LSU 
won the 2007 national champion- 
ship. 

"That is a fast, fast team. They 
get edges that you do not think 
they are going to get. They are as 
physical a team as I have watched 
in a long time," he said. "I was in 
this league for four years and I do 
not remember seeing a team that 
physical." 

LSU's smothering defense 
stopped almost everything NSU 
threw at them, holding the team to 
95 total yards and six first downs 
for the entire game. 

NSU's bright moments were 
few and far in between, and the 



missed opportunities were too much 
to overcome against a dominating 
Southeastern Conference team. 

LSU leads the series of matches 
over NSU with a record of 1 1 -0, but 
the Demons left Tiger Stadium with 
a major accomplishment. 

The Demons' three points 
scored-thanks to the foot of kicker 
John Shaunghnessy-marked the 
first time in history NSU scored on 
LSU. 

"I have to give credit to Bradley 
Dale Peveto because they are well 
coached," LSU coach Les Miles 
said. "I think they are going to be 
a very good team. I like their team. 
They have a good defense. I felt 
their special teams did a good job." 

The team travels again this 
weekend. NSU heads to Dallas, 
Texas to match up against SMU. 




Courtesy of Sports Info: 

isitation will be Friday evening 
for Dr. Loneta Graves, a former 
Northwestern State University 
vice president who was a driving 
force in creating the first athletic 
scholarships for women on the 
intercollegiate level in Louisiana. 
Graves, 88, passed away Sunday. 

Her visitation will be Friday 
evening from 5-9 p.m. at Blanchard- 
St. Denis Funeral Home in 
Natchitoches. A committal service 
will be held next Monday (Sept. 19) 
at Garden of Memories Cemetery in 
Metairie. 

In 2008, she was presented the 
Graduate N Club's Distinguished 
Service Award in recognition of 
her pivotal support of funding 
scholarships and operating funds 
that gave rise to intercollegiate 
women's sports at Northwestern in 
the mid-1970s. 

In April 1 975, Northwestern 
became the first university in 
Louisiana to issue full athletic 
scholarships to women, when 
NSU athletes Pat Nolen, Diane 
Pittman, Emma Ellerman, Louise 



"Do" Bonin, Sherrill Landry, 
Terri McDonnell, Inez Brew, 
Mona Davidson, Janie Wallace 
and Margaret Langford were the 
recipients. Tammy Primeaux and 
Lisa Brewer were high school 
seniors who accepted scholarships 
to play basketball for the Lady 
Demons. 

Among that group, Bonin, Nolen 
(Pierson) and Davidson (Martin), 
became head collegiate women's 
coaches at Nicholls, Northwestern 
and Louisiana-Monroe, 
respectively. Ellerman (Boozman) 
is one of the most successful high 
school girls coaches in state history 
at Natchitoches Central while 
Brewer is a Louisiana High School 
Hall of Fame member who is a 
nominee for the Louisiana Sports 
Hall of Fame. 

Graves remained an avid 
supporter of NSU athletics, and 
particularly women's sports, until 
her passing, frequently attending 
football, basketball, soccer and 
volleyball games and maintaining 
contact with coaches and staff 
members. 

In lieu of flowers, family 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Dr. Graves with the Lady Demon volleyball team in 2008 at the Graduate N Club ceremonies. 

Avid supporter of NSU athletics Loneta Graves passes away 



members asked contributions be 
made to the NSU Foundation with 
the designation of Women's Athletic 
Scholarship Fund. 

"Loneta Graves served 
Northwestern State University 
and its students throughout her 
life, and helped her alma mater 
become a trailblazer in the history 
of women's intercollegiate athletics 
in Louisiana," said NSU director 
of athletics Greg Burke. "She was 
a remarkable woman and a friend 
to so many past and present in our 
athletics department. We'll miss 
her and treasure her memory and 
accomplishments." 

She is survived by numerous 
nieces, nephews and their children 
as well as her "adopted" son, 
Andrew E. Nahm of New Orleans. 

A Northwestern alumnae, Graves 
was hired in 1943 at then Louisiana 
Normal School as an account clerk 
and was appointed to a position as 
an accountant four years later. She 



Shana Lee 

Sauce Reporter 

Sunday afternoon the Lady 
Demon soccer team fell short 
2-0 to Tulsa's aggressive 
offense. 

The loss dropped the Lady Demons 
to 4-3 and Tulsa improved to 4-2-1. 

"First and foremost I give Tulsa 
credit," Lady Demon soccer head 
coach Jimmy Mitchell said. "They 
are a good team and played very 
well. They took us out of what we 
wanted to do and made the game 
frustrating for us." 

Mitchell added that Tulsa was the 
better team this game and it showed 
in the final score. 

The games momentum was slowed 
when Lady Demon Alexandria 
Johnson, sophomore-forward, and 
a Tulsa player collided while going 
after the ball. 

AJ appeared to have endured 
a serious neck injury and was 
airlifted out of the complex in stable 
condition. 

"Obviously our concern is with 
AJ," Mitchell said. "It was an 
unfortunate and freak accident and 
she came down and landed wrong." 

The game resumed with 1 minutes 
left on the clock, but NSU could not 
get the ball to the goal. Tulsa had 
the upper hand Sunday outshooting 
the Lady Demons 19-3 with a 9-2 
advantage in shots on goal. 

At halftime the score looked to be 
tied 0-0, but Shelby Martin of Tulsa 
changed that when she scored with 
35 seconds remaining in the half. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Rachel O'steen keeps control of the ball as she takes on two Tulsa 
defenders. The team lost 2-0 in the match against Tulsa. 



At the 54 minute mark Stephanie 
Aitken scored putting Tulsa up 2-0. 

"We just came out here and the 
team worked really hard," junior- 
fielder Theresa Halle said. "We tried 
to put it together. Unfortunately, it 
wasn't enough but you know what, 
we are a team and we'll come back 
next Friday and show them what's 
up." 

Despite the team not playing as 
well as they hoped, they realized 
some of the things they need to work 



on before the start of conference 
play. 

"We're hoping to peak for 
conference coming up in a couple 
of weeks so this was definitely a 
learning experience," senior-fielder 
Meghan Hunter said. 

The Lady Demons are focusing 
on the upcoming game as they host 
Southern Mississippi this Friday in 
the Lady Demon Soccer Complex at 
7 p.m. 



f, ° R S7>TE E ^^ 



NSU Volleyball 

Holiday Inn Express Classic 

Prather Coliseum Sept. 16-17 

For game coverage visit nsudemons.com 




For the rest of the press release: 
check out www.nsudemons.com 



■ 




gratulations 



to your new 2011-2012 Fresh Campus officers! 




@ NSU 



Carderius "C.J." Johnson - President 
Matt Haskins - Vice President 
Chelsea Giles - Secretary 
Megan McDaniel - Recruitment Office 
Austin McCann - Assistant Event Coordinator 



*To become an official Fresh Campus member 
please attend the training meeting on 
September 20th from 5-6 in the Student Union 
room 221 . 





u r rent 



Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, September 21,2011* Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 4 



Students vote on senators, pass SGA bills 



Taylor Graves 

News Editor 

The Student Government As- 
sociation held an election for 
class senators and three legis- 
lative referendums last week. 

Brittany McConathy and John 
Wynn were elected as Freshman 
Class Senators out of four candi- 
dates. Both the Freshman and Junior 
Class Senators will have a runoff this 
week to fill the rest of the positions. 

Garrett Pierce and Kharhyzma 
Nelson will run for the final Fresh- 
man Class Senator position. The 
Junior Class Senator runoff will in- 
clude Kenneth Brown, Raven Max- 
ile, Robin Maxile and Lauren Peters 
to fill all three of the senator posi- 
tions. 

Filling the student senate is im- 
portant to continue student govern- 
ment work throughout the year. 

."I'm looking forward to getting 
the Senate up to its full capacity in 
order to be able to accomplish some 



great things for our students and uni- 
versity," Tara Luck, SGA President, 
said. 

The Senate runoffs will take place 
Wednesday and Thursday in the Stu- 
dent Union from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Students can also vote online at se- 
cure.nsula.edu/SGAVoting anytime 
before the Thursday 4 p.m. deadline. 

Students also voted on three refer- 
endums, which were all passed. 

"These referendums will make 
things easier for students to get more 
involved," Ellie Spain, SGA Senator 
at Large, said. "This also means that 
it shows exactly what SGA will do, 
so when we do it, students will have 
more faith in us." 

The first referendum passed al- 
lowed a change to Article III of the 
student Constitution to allow a non- 
voting representative to be added to 
the SGA with the job description of 
attending Student Activities Board 
meetings. 

The second bill passed during the 
election added officers to the SGA 



Cabinet. The SGA Secretary will 
now be the clerk of the Cabinet and 
keep records of the minutes. The 
President will also appoint a student 
or faculty member to the Cabinet. 

"This will give the President a 
better idea of what's going on with 
NSU at large," Spain said. 

The final bill will make SGA 
Bylaws more understandable to stu- 
dents. From now on, the election 
codes will be written in a handbook 
and available to all students wanting 
to run for SGA positions. The hand- 
book will be been written in simpler 
and more upfront language than how 
it is currently written in the Bylaws. 

Luck and the SGA were happy 
with the turn-out of students who 
voted and hope students will come 
back to vote for the runoff elections. 

"It is always important to be in- 
volved in your elections to see posi- 
tive changes here at NSU," Luck 
said. 




Photo by Katie Beverly / The Current Sauce 

Students stood in line at the Student Government Association election booths to vote for class senators, SGA 
bills, Honor Court and Mr. and Miss NSU this past Wednesday and Thursday. All elections can also be voted 
online. All bills were passed and a Honor Court and Mr. NSU was selected. A runoff will be held to choose the 
remaining class senators and Miss NSU. 



Alumna starts scholarship 
with $60,000 donation 



Taylor Graves 

News Editor 

First generation college stu- 
dents . are receiving support 
from a fellow Demon through 
an endowed scholarship in the 
amount of $100,000. 

Ida Emily Simpson, a North- 
western alumna, donated $60,000 
to the mass communication pro- 
gram this semester. Louisiana state 
funds matched Simpson's donation 
with $40,000 to create the endowed 
scholarship. 

"Ms. Simpson was delighted with 
the prospect of creating this scholar- 
ship for first generation students and 
knowing that her contribution was 
enhanced so much by the match," 
Drake Owens, director of Univer- 
sity Advancement and executive di- 
rector of the NSU Foundation, said. 

The Ida Emily Simpson First 
Generation Endowed Scholarship 
will benefit all students pursuing a 
communications degree with a con- 
centration in mass communications. 

"I think it's good someone do- 
nated money for mass communica- 
tion because I haven't seen many 
scholarships just for that," Alexis 
Reliford. freshman mass communi- 
cation major, said. 

As a freshman, Reliford has four 
years of journalism education ahead 
of her, and this scholarship could be 
a helpful tool during the upcoming 
years. 

"It would be something I'm very 
interested in applying for," she said. 
"I would use it for tuition, fees, 
books and all other education ex- 
penses." 

JC Bryant, a junior mass commu- 
nication major, also sees the aid the 
endowed scholarship could provide. 

"I would use it so I can quit work- 




Photo by News Bureau 

Ida Emily Simpson presented a donation to Drake Owens, Director of 
University Advancement to start a scholarship for first generation col- 
lege students in the mass communication field. 



ing because it is having a negative 
impact on my grades," Bryant said. 

Both Reliford and Bryant chose 
Northwestern to begin their jour- 
nalism careers, and the scholarship 
could be a way to help make their 
dreams come true. 

"I want to write for a maga- 
zine," Reliford said. "I like reading 
and have a passion for writing so I 
thought a magazine was a perfect 
fit." 

Bryant also has a passion for jour- 
nalism, which the endowed scholar- 
ship could help to support. 

"I always liked media, communi- 
cation and public speaking," he said. 
"And I feel like journalism reflects 
all of those interests." 

As a health and physical education 
graduate, Simpson enlisted in the 
Army after graduation and served 



during World War II. After the war, 
she was able to focus on her first pas- 
sion, journalism. She was stationed 
around the world and worked with 
military newspapers and public in- 
formation offices. 

Simpson retired in July 1964 
and now lives in Washington D.C. 
She has supported Northwestern 
throughout the years with donations 
for the journalism and military sci- 
ence programs. 

Her latest contribution will help 
more journalism students throughout 
their education careers. 

"It would be really nice to get 
money [for being a mass communi- 
cation major], because I am a good 
student and make good grades," 
Bryant said. "It would also allow me 
to focus more on my school work, 
which is most important." 



Index 



2 News 

3 Life 

5 Opinions 

6 Sports 



Wednesday 

91763° 



Thursday 

90760° 



Friday 

88757° 





Mr. NSU elected; two 
in runoff for Miss NSU 



Taylor Graves 

News Editor 

The student body voted on 
the 2011-2012 Mr. and Miss 
NSU this past Wednesday 
and Thursday. 

Jackson McNeal was chosen as 
Mr. NSU after being nominated by 
four Recognized Student Organiza- 
tions. 

"By receiving this honor, I can 
only feel accomplished in my con- 
tributions to the university and hope 
I influence someone the same way I 
have been," McNeal, senior health 
and exercise science major, said. 

McNeal was chosen out of two 
candidates and won with a majority 
of the student votes. 

Maegan Morace and Arielle 
Craige won runoff positions for Miss 
NSU out of six candidates. 

Since there was not a majority 
for Miss NSU, the two women with 
the highest number of votes received 
runoff positions, Ellie Spain, SGA 
Senator at Large, said. 

The opportunity to be Miss NSU 



is very special to both Morace and 

Craige. 

"I want to be Miss NSU because 
I would love to represent North- 
western State," Morace said. "This 
school has molded me into what I 
am today, and I think it would be a 
neat way to wrap up my senior year." 

Craige said: "I would love to 
have the opportunity to represent 
our school with such a high honor. 
It would also be a personal honor to 
be able to pay tribute to my ill grand- 
mother and be able to follow in her 
footsteps." 

The Miss NSU runoff election 
will be held Wednesday and Thurs- 
day in the Student Union from 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m. Students can also vote 
online at secure.nsula.edu/SGAVot- 
ing anytime before the Thursday 4 
p.m. deadline. 

Receiving the title of Mr. and 
Miss NSU is a highly respected hon- 
or that has been NSU tradition since 
1 956. Each fall semester the student 
body elects two new students who 
they think best represents the quali- 
ties and attributes of NSU. 



Homecoming 
Week Schedule 

Some of the events for Home 
coming Week include the 
following: 

President Homecoming 
Reception 

Thursday, Oct. 1 3 
Friday, Oct. 14 

Homecoming Golf 
Lunch and Scramble 

Friday. Oct. 14 
12:00 p.m. 

Homecoming Concert 

Friday, Oct. 14 
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

Homecoming Game 

Saturday, Oct. 1 5 
6 p.m. 



Oct. 1 
deadline 
to apply 
for tuition 
hardship 



NSU News Bureau 

The deadline for students to 
apply for a Financial Hard- 
ship Waiver is Oct. 1 . 
The Tuition Hardship Waiver pro- 
vides a tuition exemption to eligible 
Louisiana students for the increase 
in tuition along with the cost of the 
Academic Excellence Fee and the 
Operational Fee. 

Students must complete the appli- 
cation and meet all criteria in order 
to be eligible. They must be a full- 



time student, a Louisiana resident 
and maintain continuing academic 
eligibility for federal financial aid. In 
addition, the students must qualify 
for Pell grant as determined by the 
United States Department of Educa- 
tion. 

The waiver cannot be used in con- 
nection with other scholarships that 
exempt the same fees. 

Students can download a 2011- 
2012 application for a Tuition Hard- 
ship Waiver by visiting financialaid. 
nsula.edu/tuition-hardship-waiver. 



Saturday 

89762° 



Sunday 

92765° 



Monday 

92760° 



Tuesday 

87761° 




News 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 
mgraves009@student.nsula.edu 
September 21, 2011 





2011 HonorCourt 



Afton 
Owens 



Arielle 
Craige 



Brittany 
Jean ice 








Austin 
McCann 



Cameron 
Tillman 



CJ 
Johnson 





Hope 
McFarland 



Lauren 
Waguespack 



Maegan 
Morace 



Ruth Fruge 
Honor Court Queen 



Chase Stepp 
Honor Court King 



Jackson 
McNeal 



JD 
Hadden 



Kevin 
Blake 



Megan 
Cull en 





Shannon 
Byrd 



Tiffany 
Hudson 



The 201 1 Honor Court was voted on by the student body last 
Wednesday and Thursday. For a student to be a Honor Court 
candidate, he or she must have three Registered Student Or- 
ganizations nominate them. To be selected as a Court mem- 
ber, there has to be a majority of votes. After the majority is 
calculated, the female and male candidate with the most votes 
is elected as Honor Court King and Queen. The King, Queen 
and Court will be presented at the 201 1 Homecoming football 
game on Oct. 1 5 during halftime. 





Patrick 
Brooks 



Ryan 
Owens 



Solomon 
Matthews 



Gregory: Half 
century of 
teaching 

NSU News Bureau 

A one-year appointment has 
turned into a 50-year career 
at Northwestern State Uni- 
versity for Professor of Anthropol- 
ogy Dr. Hiram F. "Pete" Gregory. 

"I'm pleased to have been able to 
be here for such a length of time," 
said Gregory, who began working 
at Northwestern on Sept. 15, 1961. 
"I am grateful to have good health 
and to have so many good friends 
over the years. I came here when I 
was 23 as a temporary instructor and 
planned to go back to LSU for grad- 
uate school. I liked it here, then a 
position opened up in anthropology 
and geography and I stayed." 

He is believed to be the longest- 
serving employee in Northwestern \s 
127-year history, working at the 
institution for almost 40 percent of 
its tenure. Gregory has taught thou- 
sands of Northwestern students who 
have gone on to be anthropologists, 
archeologists, nurses, teachers, busi- 
nesspeople, professionals and even 
university presidents. 

"Having had a good fortune of 
taking anthropology under Dr. Greg- 
ory when I was a student at North- 




western, I can attest to his teaching 
excellence and caring concern for 
students," Dr. Webb said. "But his 
influence extends far beyond the 
walls of Northwestern, to include 
work with professional organization, 
colleagues in the field, and constitu- 
ent groups in need of information 
or assistance. He is an exceptional 
professional and person, and North- 
western is a far better place for his 
presence on our faculty and faithful 
service for 50 years. It will be ev en 



NSU begins honors program 
for freshmen this semester 



For rest of the story and 
other NSU information, visit 
the Current Sauce website at 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



NSU News Bureau 

Northwestern State University 
is implementing an Honors 
Program this semester to give 
outstanding students the opportunity 
to enrich their academic experience, 
study topics in greater depth and im- 
prove their leadership skills. 

Students enrolled in the Honors 
courses will participate in research 
and projects in addition to regular 
coursework, which administrators 
hope will engage them in their dis- 
ciplines and get them excited about 
research. 

"Taking the Honors courses shows 
that the student has done extra work. 
It's more intensive but it's also more 
enriching. The students have more 
contact with the faculty and the 
courses can be more accelerated," 
said Dr. Betsy Cochran, director of 
the University Honors Program. 

Honors courses will be designat- 
ed with an H on students' transcripts 
and they will graduate with a special 
designation. 

"The designation indicates a se- 
rious student who works indepen- 
dently. The courses also engage the 



students" interest, which is important 
for retention." 

Unlike Louisiana Scholars' Col- 
lege at NSU, the state's designated 
honors college for liberal arts and 
sciences, the new Honors Program is 
not a separate degree program; how- 
ever, students in the I fonors Program 
may take Honors courses offered by 
the Scholars" College. 

Honors sections of core classes 
and special Honors experiences in 
courses in students' majors will also 
be offered. 

Honors courses will offer stu- 
dents experience in lab research, 
service learning and other projects 
to supplement the coursework of a 
regular class. 

The Honors experience and tran- 
script designation is intended to give 
students a head start on skills they 
would need in pursuing advanced 
degrees and/or be competitive in the 
job market following graduation. 

Academic areas offering Honors 
coursework this semester are the 
School of Business, the Department 
of Biology, the Mrs. H.D. Dear Sr. 
and Alice E. Dear School of Creative 
and Performing Arts, the Depart- 



ment of Psychology and the College 
of Nursing and Allied Health. 

More academic departments are 
developing Honors curricula to be 
offered in the future. 

Dr. Susan Thorson-Barnett and 
her colleagues in the Department of 
Psychology worked for over a year 
to coordinate the Honors compo- 
nents she plans to implement in her 
Psychology 1010 class this semester 
that will be tied to a service learning 
project. 

"The Honors students will follow 
the same grading scale and take the 
same tests as the rest of the students, 
but their coursework will have a re- 
search component," Thorson-Bar- 
nett said. 

"We will meet every two weeks. 
First, the students will learn about 
the project, then we will meet at the 
library to learn to find resources in 
scholarly journals. 

"Over the course of the semester, 
the students will write a group re- 
search paper and w ill work in groups 
of two to create informational post- 
ers they will present to the class be- 
fore Thanksgiving." 

Thorson-Barnett's project will ex- 



pose the freshmen Honors students 
to concepts normally presented to 
upperclassmen. 

"We want them to be able to pres- 
ent the research during next spring's 
Research Day and we hope we can 
continue the project and tie it in 
with service learning and present at 
the spring Serving Learning confer- 
ence," she said. 

To be eligible for the Honors Pro- 
gram, freshmen must have a com- 
posite score of 25 or higher on their 
ACT and a grade point average of 
3.2 or higher. 

Provisional admission is available 
for students who hav e an ACT score 
of 25 or higher and a 3.0 grade point 
average, and for students with a 24- 
25 on the ACT and a grade point av- 
erage of 3.2 or higher. 

Transfer and continuing students 
must have a 3.25 grade point aver- 
age and have completed 30 hours of 
coursework. 

For more information on the NSU 
Honors Program, log on to honors. 
nsula.edu/ or contact Cochran at 
(318) 357-4575 or e-mail cochran@ 
nsula.edu. 




Student Messenger Bulletin Board 

2011 Argus available 

On Wednesday, September 21, from 9 a.m. to 1 :30 p.m., Argus staff members will be distribut- 
ing copies on the first floor of Kyser Hall. If you can't make it then, stop by The Writing Center, 
335 Kyser, Monday - Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. to get your copy. If you have any 
questions, contact Argus Editor Marcus Lee at argus@nsula.edu or 357-5575. 

Donate used items to NSU 

Department of Health and Human Performance needs your old ink jets, laser toners, Ipods, 
laptops and cell phones. Proceeds go back to NSU through Health Promotion and Health Edu- 
cation activities for faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact Cory Lacek at 
clacekOO 1 @student.nsula.edu. 

Operation Homefront 

Donate non-perishable food items for the Thanksgiving holiday for military families in Loui- 
siana who are struggling. The collection will take place until Nov 12. Collection bins are lo- 
cated in: Morrison Hall student lounge, costume shop in CAPA building and South Hall's main 
lobby. For more information, contact Megan Guidry at mguidry002@student.nsula.edu 

National Student Exchange 

The NSE allows you to attend another school for a semester or a year. The deadline for apply- 
ing for exchange for 2012-2013 will be early in spring 2012 semester. For more information, 
contact Dr. Keith Dromm at drommku/ nsula.edu. 



NSU Police 
Blotter 

Reports from the NSU 
police station from 
Sept 14 - 19 

September 14 

1:05 p.m. - Traffic accident west 
of Prather Stadium 

2:15 p.m. - Bike was stolen 

1:09 a.m. - Police escort request- 
ed at field house due to vehicle 
damage 

September 15 

7:45 a.m. - Student was stung 
in their room on campus, filing 
report 

3:50 p.m. - Fire alarm at Kyser 
Hall 

3:58 p.m. - Natchitoches Fire 
Department on scene 



4:15 p.m. - Fire alarm reset 

5:30 p.m. - Stolen cell phone at the 
WRAC 

5:50 p.m. - Police arrive at WRAC 

6:00 p.m. - Subject left phone on 
bleachers 

7:01 p.m. - Phone has been re- 
trieved 

11:22 p.m. - Police advised students 
at University Columns of complaint 
and to cease actions, and if they had 
to come back further actions would 
be taken 

September 16 

8:30 p.m. - Call from the Natchi- 
toches Central High School football 
game requesting to speak with a 
City officer or a sheriff deputy about 
an incident at the game. Contacted 
City police so they could notify an 
officer at the game. 

8:50 p.m. - City PD called back 



and advised that he spoke with the 
gentlemen and advised him that he 
had to file the report with campus 
police 

September 18 

2:49 a.m. - Subject called in refer- 
ence to loud noises in apartment in 
University Columns 

2:51 a.m. - Police arrive at apart- 
ment and about 20 people in 
apartment 

3:15 a.m. - The resident of the 
apartment showed up and had just 
gotten back in town. The apart- 
ment was cleared out without 
incident 

September 19 

8:40 a.m. - Anonymous call-in 
reported seeing police cars run a 
stop sign in front of housing off 
Tarlton 

8:50 a.m. - Call-in reported 
wreckless driving by someone in a 
Toyoto Echo, silver 




Life 



Yevettc Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student. nsula.edu 
September 2 1 , 2011 



SAB demon cash kart 



McNeal named Mr. NSU, Honor Court member 




Submitted photos from SAB 

Student Activities Board 
hosted Demon Cash Kart on 
Monday. 

The event was a play on Dis- 
covery Channel's 'Cash Cab.' 
Members of the Student 
Activities Board drove NSU 
golf carts around campus se- 
lecting students to participate 
in Northwestern trivia games. 
Students were given the op- 
portunity to earn prizes after 
correctly answering questions 
about the university. 
Pictured above is SAB event 
host, Chelsea Giles with a win- 
ner of 'Demon Cash Kart' and 
to the right are two partici- 
pants in the event. 



1 




Compiled by 
Yevette Wagoner 

Life editor 

What's your major? 

Health and Exercise Science with 

a concentration in Pre-Physical 

Therapy 

Hometown? 

Jennings. La. 

Why did you decide to come to 
NSU? 

/ came to NSU because of the group 
of great friends I had coming here. 
After I toured the campus. I knew 
instantly this was the place I would 
end up. Also. I was always told of 
the high success turn out with the 
Pre-Physical Therapy program from 
the university. 

What do you like most about 
NSU? 

NSU is probably the friendliest 
campus in Louisiana that I have ex- 
perienced. There is always someone 
willing to help you get invovled. The 
number one thing that stands out 
the most and that I am grateful for 
is the faculty. They are reasonable 
and are always willing to help out 
the students whenever possible. 

What would you like to say to 
the NSU students? 

The message I would want to send 
NSU students would be, live your 
college days to the fullest; cherish 
every moment of it. It is most cer- 
tainly the best time of your lives so 
far. And last but not least, never be 
content with average, because aver- 
age is just as close to the bottom as 
it is to the top! 

What will you miss most about 
NSU? 

/ know already there will be so many- 
things I will miss about this univer- 




Jackson McNeal 

sity. The most important thing will 
probably be all of the relationships I 
have made in the past few years and 
also all of the sporting events that 
have help develop my Demon pride 
for the university. 

What are you excited for dur- 
ing Homecoming? 

Homecoming is always a great time 
of the year. Im excited about the en- 
tire Homecoming Week. I have full 
faith in SAB to present another great 
week of events. 

What do you feel is your big- 
gest accomplishment at NSU 
so far? 

/ feel like my biggest accomplish- 



ubmitted photo 



ment is the dramatic change I have 
made from high school. That in- 
cludes my grades, the social aspect 
of my life, service work etc. That 
initial change in me has helped me 
branch out and make a change in 
different organizations I have had 
my hand in and even some I haven 't. 

What are your plans after grad- 
uation? 

Graduation still feels a ways away, 
but 1 have opened many doors to my 
future and have many friends and 
family that have helped me along 
this journey. What I do all depends 
on the timing. I have full faith that 
when the time presents itself I will 
head right where I need to go. 



Push 
America 



Checking 




Low Fees 

REALLY, THEY'RE JUST THE BEGINNING 
OF HOW WE HELP YOU THRIVE 



L a Capit ol 



1961 




FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 

TOGETHER WE THRIVE 
311 Keyser Ave • 926 University Pkwy • 800.522.2748 / www.lacapfcu.org 



Federally Insured by NCUA 




Photos by Yevette Wagoner 

Members of Pi Kappa Phi during their scaffold sit for Push America. 

(Left to right) Top: Kolt Kays, Ryan Jeffords Middle: John Simar, Christopher Alley, Nick Nguyen 
Bottom: Scott Mayeaux, Chase Harvey 




The gentlemen of the Beta Omicron chapter of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity hosts an annual scaffold sit to raise 
money and awarness for Push America. 

Founded in 1977, this philanthropy instills lifelong service in the fraternity members and serves people with 
disabilities. 

The scaffold sit started Monday at 5 p.m. and will end Wednesday at 5 p.m. (48 hours total) 

The men take shifts sitting on top of the scaffold to collect money from students, members of the 

community and even passersby. 

The men are also hosting a 'Penny Wars' with the women of the College Panhellenic Council, with the 
winner's prize being to pie a Pi Kappa Phi member in the face. 

The three members of Pi Kappa Phi who are up for being pied in the face are: Chase Harvey, Cameron 
Moises and Christopher Alley 

This is the third year that the fraternity has participated in this event and plan to continue the tradition 
annually. 




Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 
September 21,2011 



Miss NSU run-off election; voting online or at Student Union 




Maegan Morace 



What's your major? 

hospitality management and 
tourism. 

What is your hometown? 

Jena, La. 

Why do you want to be Miss 
NSU? 

/ want to be Miss NSU because I 
would love to represent Northwest- 
ern State. This school has molded 
me into what I am today and I think 
it would be a neat way to wrap up 
my senior year. 

Why did you choose NSU? 

/ decided to come to NSU at an 
early age. My godparents would 
bring me to Natchitoches to see the 
Christmas lights and then when I 
got older I always wanted to come 
to the town that already was special 
to me. 

What do you like most about 
NSU? 

The thing I like most about NSU is 
that I am not just a number here. I 
know my teachers and other faculty 
and there is always someone to say 
hello to in the hall. 

What do you want to say to 
NSU students? 

To the NSU students I would say 
you have picked a great school. 
I am so sad that I am a senior so 



enjoy every single moment because 
it flies by. I would also say to get 
involved! Jump into everything that 
interests you, even if it s not what 
you are used to. 

This is a lime to try on all differ- 
ent hats to see what you want to do 
with the rest of your life. Getting 
involved makes your college experi- 
ence so much better and creates 
and opportunity to give back to the 
university while growing as a young 
adult. 

What will you miss most about 
NSU? 

The thing I will miss most about 
NSU is my sorority, Sigma Sigma 
Sigma and Greek life in general. My 
sorority has completely changed my 
life. I had no idea what I was miss- 
ing until I became part of Sigma s 
sisterhood. I have been truly blessed 
to have 85 sisters backing me up 
and encouraging me throughout my 
college experience. 

What excites you about 
Homecoming? 

The whole Homecoming Week is 
so much fun! I love all the festivities 
throughout the week: Greek com- 
petitions, parade, pep rally and of 
course the game- 1 love everything 
about it. 

If I had to choose, my favorite 



would have to be the game. I love 
football and the Demons come alive 
especially at Homecoming because 
there are even more people in the 
stands cheering since alumni come 
back to their alma mater. 

What is your biggest 
accomplishment at NSU? 

My biggest accomplishment so 
far has been getting voted onto 
the Homecoming Court! I was 
so honored to even be nominated 
and then completely excited when 
I got on with my Sigma little Sis 
and grandlittle sis. So thanks to 
Sigma. I FC. freshman connection, 
CPC and ASA for making that pos- 
sible 

What are your plans after 
graduation? 

After college I have so many dreams 
and plans to accomplish. I would 
love to be in a quick-pace job in 
marketing or advertising in a big- 
ger city. 1 want to get my masters 
probably back here at NSU. I want 
to travel, possibly become a Sigma 
advisor, and of course way later get 
married and be a mom! 

I have throughly enjoyed NSU and 
I plan on coming back to check on 
my Sigma girls and enjoy reunions. 
My Demon pride runs deep- Go 
Demons! 



Arielle Craige 



What's your major? 

Business Administration major 
with a minor in Computer Informa- 
tion System (Cl$) V , 
What is your hometown? 

New Orleans, La. 
Why do you want to be Miss 
NSU? 

/ would love to have the oppor- 
tunity to represent our school with 
such a high honor. It would also be 
a personal honor to be able to pay 
tribute to my ill grandmother and 
be able to follow in her footsteps. 
She was given the opportunity and 
represented her university with the 
same honor back in 1959. I know 
she would be proud if I were able 
to keep her tradition and memory 
alive! 

Why did you decide to come to 
NSU? 

/ wanted to get the experience of 
something different than the fast 
pace of "The Big Easy. " When 
I visited Natchitoches on Senior 
Day. I fell in love with the quaint 
atmosphere that this town offers 
and decided to take the chance to 
experience a different scenery. 
What do you like most about 
NSU? 

Most of all I like the people of 
NSU. Ever since I was a freshman 
back in 2008. if I ever needed any- 



thing 1 always had a great support 
system within my advisors, staff and 
facility and of course my friends. 
Is there anything you would 
you like to say to the NSU stu- 
dents? 

/ would love to thank the student 
body for even being considered to 
be put on the Homecoming 2011 
ballot to begin with. There were a 
lot of great leaders on the ballot 
and to be chosen for the run-offs is 
an amazing feeling. I appreciate all 
my supporters and am very grateful 
to be given this chance to represent 
our school. 

What will you miss most about 
NSU? 

After I graduate NSU, I think 
I will miss having the life of an 
undergraduate the most: studying 
in Watson until the student worker 
announces it s about to close, walk- 
ing to Russell Hall and sitting in the 
courtyard in-between classes, do- 
ing community service with Helping 
Hands and other great RSOs, and 
being able to sit in Vies and hang 
with friends. The whole experience 
that I have had at NSU will al- 
ways be remembered and definitely 
missed. 

What are you excited for dur- 
ing Homecoming? 

Football! I cannot wait until the 



game. The smell. of BBQ. sound 
of great music during tail gating 
and then going lo sit in the stands 
watching the Demons take us to 
victory will be great! 1 know the day 
will be filled with fun for everyone. 
What do you feel is your big- 
gest accomplishment at NSU 
so far? 
/ feel that my greatest accom- 
plishment at NSU thus far would 
have to be making it on either the 
President s List or the Dean s list 
every semester since my very first 
semester back in 2008. Thus is 
such a great accomplishment to 
me because not only did I achieve 
this, I did it while being very active 
on campus by sitting on executive 
boards and being a member of mul- 
tiple RSOs, but also while holding 
three jobs at one point. 1 feel that 
this accomplishment is definitely an 
example of being a well rounded 
student and I am very proud of that. 
What are your plans after grad- 
uation? 

Iam currently looking for intern- 
ships at financial intuitions and law 
firms because after graduation. I 
plan to either start a career in ac- 
cordance with my business degree 
or take a huge step and continue my 
education by going to law school. I 
am leaning towards law school. 



Kappa Alpha Order supports Muscular Dystrophy 
Association, scholarship at annual golf tournament 



Yevette Wagoner 

Life editor 

The men of Kappa Alpha 
Order raised $2,000 for 
the Muscular Dystrophy 
Association and $500 for the Julian 
Foy Memorial scholarship at their 
13 ,h annual golf tournament. 

The winners of the golf 
tournament, held at the NSU 
Recreation Complex Saturday, were 
alumni members Coke Guy, Harry 
Garsee. Paula Ray and Joe Beasley. 

The Julian Foy Memorial 
scholarship is in memory of Kappa 
Alpha brother. Julian Foy, who 
passed in the early 2000s. 

The $500 academic scholarship is 
awarded to the Kappa Alpha Order 
new member of Gamma Psi chapter 
who has the highest grade point 
average for the fall semester. 

Kappa Alpha Order annually 




supports their philanthropy. 
Muscular Dystrophy Association. 

Forty members of Kappa Alpha 
Order, including active and alumni 
members, participated and entered 
the golf tournament. 

The event organizer was 
Brenden Guthrie, junior Computer 
Information Systems major. 

"What I enjoyed most about 



the golf tournament was all of the 
[Kappa Alpha] brothers and alumni 
coming together to support MDA." 
he said. 

To set up and run the tournament 
were 1 7 prospective members and 
16 active members. 

One of those who helped was 
Justin Benefield. junior General 
Studies major. 

"'After all the hard work that 
went into it. there was nothing like 
getting to play 1 8 holes again with 
the older guys that gave me their 
time and taught me everything I 
know about KA." he said. 

Four men were allowed to be on 
a team, thus forming 10 teams. 

President of Kappa Alpha Order 
Ryan Pang said. "It's a great time of 
year for us because this is the time 
that we have new members, and 
it's a great time for them to meet 
the alumni and share crazy stories 
together." 




'New Faces' 



Photo by Katie Beverly 



New freshmen majors in the Creative and Performing Arts Department annually participate in showcase of 
talent known as New Faces. Upperclassmen coach the new talent, whose production is open to the public. 
This year's performance on Monday had a full audience at A. A. Fredricks Auditorium and featured about 40 
students. 



Upcoming Creative and Performing Arts events: 



The Wiz' 

October 19-22 
7:30 p.m. 

$15 for adults, $12 Senior Citizens over 65 
FREE for NSU student with student ID card 
Reservations not required for this production 



'Importance of Being Earnest' 

November 3-5 and November 9-12 
7:30 p.m. 

$15 for adults, $12 Senior Citizens over 65 
FREE for NSU student with student ID card 
Reservations are required for this production 




Opinions 



Hunter Bower 
Opinions Editor 
hbowerOO 1 @student.nsula.edur 
September 2 1 , 20 1 1 



Rants : 
Flying Off 
the Handle 
with Flyers 



Tom H. Lawler 

Staff Columnist 




Ever 
since 
I was 
a freshman 
here I have 
received 
considerable 
amusement 
from the 
heaps and 
hordes of 
flyers found in many locations 
throughout our campus. This 
amusement ranges from humorous 
curiosity to blatant silliness to 
outright puzzlement over the 
content, both words and images, on 
said flyers. 

My paramount and preferred 
example is the nightclub posters, 
flyers, and leaflets. Every week 
these tiny reminders of parties 
infiltrate the cafeterias, the union, 
our vehicles, our dorms, and our 
lofty halls of learning. 

My personal view is that though 
these flyers stand out in absurdity, 
they are slightly more practical than 
they appear. Slightly. 

I would imagine my fascination 
of these flyers stems from my 
fascination of people. However I 
can also attest to the fact that I have 
never in my academic career been 
a witness to such an event. So for 
me and maybe for you, dear reader, 
these are like a keyhole-view to a 
future Friday night never attended. 

So can it really be that an 
attractive woman floating on 
bubbles and pouring champagne 
on to a BMW surrounded by stacks 
of money has been waiting for me 
to show up all this time? I would 
not think so. Otherwise she will 
be severely upset with me by this 
point. 

Yet, it seems that no one 
questions this whimsical 
ludicrousness. Either these flyers 
have gained mass acceptance 
(otherwise known as 'cool') across 
campus, or the silly nature of these 
flyers has become an unnoticeable 
and an unfunny staple in our daily 
lives as students. 

While the images and phrases 
make me chuckle, what bewilders 
me is that does everyone on our 
campus see themselves in this wayl 
If you think that hanging out in 
cafeteria all day, living in a dorm 
or apartment, struggling with your 
education or ignoring it altogether 
is glamorous, then I believe you are 
sorely mistaken. 

This is because nothing in a 
student's life is glamorous, no 
matter what the popular culture 
may tell you. Though hopefully on 
our way to the big time, we haven't 
made it yet. Nevertheless, these 
flyers give us something to look 
forward to or distract us from our 
daily drudgery. 

True, some of us may 
be majoring in fraternity or 
sorority with a minor in alcohol 
or a concentration in social 
engagements. Still, these flyers do 
serve a purpose. They inform of us 
of our surroundings and let us know 
of how the weekend is going to 
celebrate us into the new week. This 
is the absurdity and practicality of 
nightclub flyers. 






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James Franco, Freida Pinto 

2. TheSmurfs (PG) 

Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays 

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Daniel Craig, Harrison Ford 

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Ryan Reynolds, Jason Bateman 

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1. Pamela // 

2. Brenda, 

3. Nancy// 

4. Regina' 

5. Sandra / 

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7. Ruth / 

8. Patricia 

9. Becky 

10. Susan \ 

Source: www.circleofmoms.com 




He gets my vote: 
Rock Nowlin 



Ruth Wisher 

Sauce Columnist 




T 



he State 



Representative 
race is less than 
a month away 
and I want to 
tell you, my 
fellow students, 
why 1 will vote 
for Rick Nowlin 
to serve his second term as Disctrict 
23 Representative. 

I had the priv ildege of working 
this past legislative session in the 
State Capitol. While there, I was 
able to see firsthand the respect and 
admiration that Representatives, 
Senate Members.and others who 
work at the Capitol have for him. 

I believe in facts and proof, so I 
want to give you information that 
I believe shows the character of 
this man. Nowlin has owned and 
operated businesses in Natchitoches 
for about 30 years. He is the 
owner of N&A Inc., Consulting 
Engineers and Land Surveyors and 
has also owned restaurants and 
other businesses at his Ducoumau 
Townhouse location in downtown 
Natchitoches. 

I believe this shows that Nowlin 
has the ability to successfully lead, 
i n 20 1 0. Nowlin was chosen as one 
of the 40 legislators nationwide to 
receive a Henry Toll Fellowship 
from the Council of State 
Governments. What a tremendous 
honor! 

Rep. Nowlin serves on several 
committees including: Ways and 
Means Committee; Joint Committee 
on Capital Outlay; Municipal, 
Parochial, and Cultural Committee; 
and Health and Welfare. 
Nowlin currently serves as the 
Vice Chair for the Health and 
Welfare Committee which is a big 
accomplishment for a first-term 
Representative. 

The Louisiana Primary Care 
Association presented Nowlin 
the Charles [. Hudson Memorial 
Award last year for outstanding 
service in health care and legislative 
leadership on behalf of Louisiana's 
Health Centers. He also received 
an award last year from the 
Natchitoches Parish Chamber of 
Commerce for support of Taxpayer 
Fairness Bills and was presented 
a Business Champion Award from 
the Chamber of Commerce of 
Southwest Louisiana. 

I believe people want someone 
they can trust, depend on and 
be proud of. I am proud to call 
Mr. Rick Nowlin my State 
Representative. Awards and 
accolades are important, but they 
don't vote for you. A candidate 
must have a love for the people they 
represent, and I am confident when 
I say that he does. I believe he has 
the intentions to make Natchitoches, 
District 23 and Louisiana the best it 
can be. 

In 2007. when Nowlin ran his 
first race, I helped by making phone 
calls, waving signs, and handing 
out brochures. I was 1 7 at the time 
and could not vote, but I knew we 
needed a man like him serving our 
state. Four years later, I am 2 1 and 
I have the right to vote. We all, as 
adults, have the right to vote. 



For rest of story: 
go to 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 
- www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
September 21, 2011 



2 Lady Demons earn All-Tournament honors at Holiday Inn Express Classic 




by Gary Hardamon 

Freshman outsider hitter Kelly Jimenez earns a kill in match against UCA. The team lost the match in five 
sets: 19-25, 24-26, 25-20, 25-20, 17-15. 

NSU welcomes new women's cross country head coach 



Kavolshaia Howze 

Courtesy of Sports Info 

Adam Malloy, who helped the 
James Madison 2010 wom- 
en's cross country captured its 
first Eastern College Athletic Con- 
ference team and individual cham- 
pionship in ten years, is the newest 
addition to the Northwestern State 
track and field coaching staff. 

Malloy, 25, enters his first year of 
full-time coaching to replace Heath- 
er McDaniel as the head coach for 
women's cross country, leading the 
team through its first meet at Mc- 
Neese on Sept. 2 and a second place 
finish while senior Lawanda Perkins 
captured the individual title in last 
Saturday's Louisiana Tech Mook 4 
Invitational. 

win the spring, Malloy will work 
primarily as an assistant coach with 
the distance-running athletes during 
the indoor and outdoor track sea- 
sons. His hiring has been approved 
by the Board of Supervisors for the 
University of Louisiana system, 
which includes Northwestern. 

"Adam has been great addition to 
our staff," said long-time NSU track 
and field head Leon Johnson. "He 
has great knowledge about distance 
running and he's doing a great job 
with the runners. With time, I know 
he could lead us to the top of the 



Pi 




Adam Malloy 



conference." 

"Adam doesn't mind getting his 
hands dirty," said veteran NSU head 
women's track and field head coach 
Mike Heimerman. 

"He came in only days before 
the athletes were to report to prac- 
tice and he hit the ground running 
and spending a lot hours preparing 
the runners and we feel he's going to 
do well for us." 

The Ephrata, Penn. native comes 
to Northwestern with a solid back- 
ground as a student-athlete and part- 
time coach in the sport of distance 
running. 

Before graduating from James 
Madison with a M.S. degree in Ki- 
nesiology-Sport Leadership in May, 
he served as a volunteer coach for 



the women's cross country team. In 
that time, the Dukes captured sev- 
eral team and individual champion- 
ship titles including the 2009-2010 
Colonial Athletic Association stee- 
plechase championship, 2010 CAA 
cross country team championship 
and last season's aforementioned 
ECAC team and individual champi- 
onships. 

A 2009 graduate of Millersville 
University of Pennsylvania, Malloy 
was an all-round standout student- 
athlete and a two-time NCAA quali- 
fier on the cross country team. 

He became the top finisher for 
the cross country team on many oc- 
casions and marked his named in the 
Marauders' record books among the 
top 25 all-time finishers in the 8K 
(13th) and 10K. courses (24th). Mal- 
loy also contributed on the track, 
setting school records in the 4x400 
and 4x800 (second), 400-meter dash 
(sixth), and the 800-meter dash and 
3,000-meter steeplechase (tenth) and 
earning a spot on the 2009 All-Con- 
ference 3,000-Meter Steeplechase 
outdoor team. 

Mallory was born July 16. 1986 
to Ms. Karen Malloy. He is a mem- 
ber of the National Intramural-Rec- 
reation Sports Association (NIRSA) 
and the United States of America 
Track and Field (USTAF) and en- 
joys drawing, running, traveling and 
playing basketball and soccer. 



Dynomite: close was never good enough for me 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

The second 
week of 
profes- 
s i o n a 1 
football has 
come and gone, 
and it was ex- 
citing. Brees and company had their 
way with the Chicago Bears, Atlanta 
and Philly battled to the very end 
and even Detroit showed the world 
some offensive firepower by domi- 
nating Kansas City. 

However, one game in particular 




I was not pleased with at all. That is 
the late-afternoon game betw een the 
San Francisco 49ers and the Dallas 
Cowboys. 

If you know me, you know that 
my favorite team is the Niners. I was 
extremely happy that we pummeled 
the defending NFC West Seahawks 
in week one. 

I watched Sunday's game with 
alacrity as we discombobulated the 
Cowboys and looked as if we were 
going to easily take game. That 
changed in a matter of minutes. 

Our two-score lead was cut in half 
right before the break thanks to sheer 
luck and Miles Austin. I didn't lose 
faith. Besides, we've had their num- 



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ber up until that point. Second half 
play showed more balance between 
both teams. 

I credit this to the change in play 
calls for the Niners. They ran the ball 
less and threw more. This was a bad 
move. I knew it was going to come 
back to haunt us, and eventually it 
did. Somehow after strange turn of 
event, the Cowboys managed to tie 
the game and send it into ov ertime. 

On the first Cowboys overtime 
play, Tony Romo completed a 77- 
yard pass to Jesse Holley to set up 
the winning field goal. 

We were so close to winning two 
straight games. Almost is not good 
enough for me. Two botched plays 
lead to our first-certainly not last- 
blemish on the overall record. 



Shana Lee 

Sauce Reporter 

Last Thursday night, the 
Northwestern State volleyball 
team faced the defending 
Southland Conference Champions 
in the newly renovated Prather 
Coliseum. 

While the Lady Demons scored 
two match points, they could not 
hold off Central Arkansas as they 
went on to win in five sets: 19-25, 
24-26,25-20,25-20, 17-15. 

"Tonight we played at a real high 
level but wasn't able to pull it out," 
Lady Demon volleyball co-head 
coach Hugh Hemesman said. "It's 
hard to lose but we showed that we 
can compete with the big teams in 
this league." 

Two Lady Demon players 
were honored for their tournament 
performance: Stacey Di Francesco 
and Emily Sweet. 

DiFrancesco got her fifth double- 
double of the season with a match- 
high of 17 kills and 12 digs. Other 
contributors to the Central Arkansas 
game included Mackenzie Neely 
with 10 kills and Emily Sweet with 
45 assists. 

NSU had a season-high of 16 
aces compared to UCA's seven. 
Neely led with four aces and Keelie 
Arneson set a personal best with 
three. 



"It was exciting to have 
our first home game. It was 
more comfortable to be here. " 
DiFrancesco said. "We played more 
as a team the second set and calmed 
down and worked hard. I think we 
played hard, really good volleyball. 

DiFrancesco explained that 
despite losing, it was good to show 
everyone that the Lady Demons can 
compete as a young team. 

Friday night the Lady Demons 
slid past Alcorn State in straight 
sets: 25-8, 25-8 and 25-14. 

Emily Johnson holds the most 
aces in a single match this season 
after her performance against 
Alcorn State. Also, the team hit a 
season best mark of .424, and only 
had seven errors through the match. 

Kelly Jimenez had a team high 
of eight kills, while Joyner set a 
personal-best with the finish on six 
attacks. 

Vanessa Coleman and Neely 
also registered seven and six kills. 
Defensively, Jimenez and Jessica 
Guttierrez each had five digs and 
Guttierrez also helped out with four 
kills. 

"We got to play a lot of kids and 
it was fun to see the kids that don't 
usually get to play," Hemesman 
said. 

While the Lady Demons gave a 
great show, they fell short against 
the tournament champions Arkansas 



State Saturday afternoon in straight 
sets: 25-16, 25-19. and 25-12. 
Coleman and DiFrancesco each 
had six kills apiece to lead NSU 
offensively (3-10). 

Jimenez finished with five 
attacks and Neely killed four and 
blocked two. Arneson had a game- 
high of 14 digs and an assist. 

Sweet registered a game-high 20 
assists and had two kills, two digs 
and an ace. 

Arkansas State went undefeated 
in the Conference opener and also 
beat the reigning champions Central 
Arkansas. 

"This conference will be 
a dogfight. I don't know that 
anyone is on top right now or 
anyone is truly at the bottom," said 
Hemesman. 

"We found this out last year, it 
doesn't matter who's who. it's going 
to be a battle. Our goal is to make 
the conference tournament and do 
our best to get there." 

The Lady Demons will be back 
in action on the road Thursday as 
they face Stephen F. Austin at 6:30 
p.m. Saturday they will face Sam 
Houston State in Huntsville, Texas, 
at 2 p.m. 

The team will in Prather 
Coliseum Oct. 8. when they host 
the Texas State Bobcats. The game 
will begin at 2 p.m. 





@NSU 



YOU KNOW??? 



Secondhandsmoke has twice as 
much nicotine and tar compared to 
the smoke that the smoker inhales. 
(www.publichealthgreybruce.on.ca) 



Secondhand smoke contains over 4000 
chemicals including more than 40 
cancer causing agents and 200 known 
poisons, (www.umn.edu) 



In the United States, secondhand 
smoke is responsible forabout 
46,000 heart disease deaths each 
year, (www.cancer.gov) 




— 



NSU 



Demon Football 

Southland Conference opener 

Thibodaux, La. Sept. 24, 6 p.m. 
Battle for the NSU trophy 

For game coverage visit nsudemor 




NSU 



u rrent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, September 28, 201 1 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 5 



College life can lead to stress 



Taylor Graves 

News Editor 

More than 19 million Ameri- 
can adults are affected by 
clinical depression every 
year, according to Mental Health 
America. 

These staggering statistics prompt- 
ed the Psychology Department to 
plan a service-learning project for 
free depression screenings on Oct. 6 
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Fried- 
man Student Union. 

"Of the millions of Americans 
who suffer from depression, many 
experience their first symptoms 
while attending college," Dr. Kath- 
ryn Kelly, psychology professor, 
said. 

"For some students, the social, 
academic and financial stressors as- 
sociated with this transitional period 



can be overwhelming, and taken 
together, these things can all play a 
part in the development of depres- 
sion." 

During the National Depression 
Screening Day, students can come 
to the Student Union and fill out a 
questionnaire in private, which will 
ask questions to screen for signs of 
depression, bipolar disorder, gen- 
eralized anxiety disorder and post- 
traumatic stress disorder. 

Each questionnaire will be scored, 
and someone will be able to re- 
view the results with each student. 
If needed, referrals can be made for 
students, too. 

Although students may not show 
symptoms of depression or other 
disorders, they may still be affected 
by depression and not realize it. 

"Sometimes individuals can be 
exhibiting mild symptoms of de- 



pression that have simply not gotten 
bad enough to cause concern," Kelly 
said. 

"The purpose for the screenings 
is to identify individuals that suffer 
from depression before it becomes 
too severe, allowing them to take ad- 
vantage of available resources ear- 
lier in the course of the illness." 

Students from the Psychology 
Department will help throughout the 
National Depression Screening Day 
to gain experience and understand 
the field of work they are entering. 

"The students will not only be 
gaining experience, but also they 
will be raising awareness and offer- 
ing valuable knowledge about de- 
pression and other disorders that are 
being screened for," she said. 

Overall, the National Depres- 
sion Screening Day is meant to help 
students with the stressful and de- 




Photo by Taylor Graves / Current Sauce 

Career Fair Day 

The Counseling and Career Services Center hosted Career Fair Day Tuesday in the Friedman Student 
Union for students to talk to employers and graduate schools. Some of the companies at Career Fair Day 
were Amerisafe, U.S. Department of State, Colonial Life, Brown Systems and Walgreens. Graduate schools 
with booths at the event included LSU Law, McNeese and NSU. 



manding years of college life either 
through awareness or further help. 

"I hope that we will make people 
more aware of the prevalence and 
seriousness of this illness, and most 
importantly, provide those that are 
currently suffering from depression, 
or any other mental disorder, the 
tools and resources needed to effec- 
tively manage it," Kelly said. 

If students need further counseling 
services, they can contact the Coun- 
seling and Career Services Center at 
(318) 357-5621 or go to Room 305 
in the Friedman Student Union. 



Depression 
Screening 

Date: Oct. 6 
Time: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Where: Student Union 
Free to all NSU students 



Depression Symptoms Warning Signs 

• Persistent sad, anxious or "empty" mood and 
changes in sleep patterns 

• Reduced appetite and weight loss, or increased 
appetite and weight gain 

• Loss of pleasure and interest in once-enjoyable 
activities, including sex 

• Restlessness, irritability 

• Persistent physical symptoms that do not re- 
spond to treatment, such as chronic pain or di- 
gestive disorders 

• Difficulty concentrating at work or at school, or 
difficulty remembering things or making deci- 
sions 

• Fatigue or loss of energy 

• Feeling guilty, hopeless or worthless 

• Thoughts of suicide or death 

Source: Mental Health America 



SGA president seeking more diversity, 
representation in student government 



NSU News Bureau 

Northwestern State University 
Student Government Associa- 
tion President Tara M. Luck 
has been appointed to the execu- 
tive board of the Council of Student 
Body Presidents (COSBP) and will 
serve as chair of the Legislative and 
Academic Affairs Committee. 

The Legislative and Academic Af- 
fairs Committee plays a role in pre- 
senting information to the Board of 
Regents, the board that coordinates 
all public higher education in Loui- 
siana. 

Mem'"-^ of the committee serve 
as advocates for students on issues 
that could affect higher education 
policy. 

Luck's presidency comes during 
a time when NSU's SGA is focused 
on solving internal problems raised 
during last spring's on-line election 
process. The SGA cabinet is cur- 
rently working to clarify campaign 
guidelines and improve the election 
system. Luck also hopes to engage 
a broader range of student involve- 
ment and seek ways to better serve 
the students. 

"We want to bring new life to the 
student government and get back to 
the basics of representing students," 
she said. "We want it to be more in- 
clusive." 

Luck is a senior liberal arts ma- 
jor in the Louisiana Scholars' Col- 
lege with a concentration in fine and 
performing arts with an emphasis in 
vocal performance. She is a business 
minor. 



Luck describes herself as a mili- 
tary brat who grew up in several 
locations and graduated from high 
school in Germany. Both her parents 
are Northwestern State graduates 
and her grandparents live in Gray- 
son. 

Luck said her experiences moving 
frequently as a youngster made her 
aware of individuals who feel alien- 
ated. As SGA president, she is in a 
position to represent students who 
may feel disenfranchised and hopes 
the SGA will do more to reach out to 
students and encourage them to get 
involved. 

"We'd like to create more diver- 
sity in the SGA," she said. "We are 
encouraging each Recognized Stu- 
dent Organization to suggest people 
and encourage them to represent 
their group. The SGA tries to stay 
non-partisan and instead provide an 
opportunity for increased student in- 
volvement." 

SGA initiatives this fall will in- 
clude a voter registration drive and a 
canned food drive and members are 
considering a tutoring and outreach 
program for high school students 
who will face higher college admis- 
sions standards. 

NSU will also participate in the 
University of Louisiana System's 
student-driven initiatives to raise 
funding and awareness for St. Jude 
Children's Research Hospital. Luck 
serves on the UL System's Student 
Advisory Council. 

According to Luck, strides are 
already being made to improve 
communication among Registered 



Student Organizations (RSOs) on 
campus. 

Northwestern State was the first 
university in the UL System to im- 
plement OrgSync, an on-line student 
organization management system 
that facilitates internal and external 
communication among university 
RSOs. 

According to Luck, the paperless 
system has built cohesiveness among 
groups at Northwestern through a 
news feed and a university calendar 
and is useful in tracking alumni. 

OrgSync enables RSOs to upload 
charters, bylaws and information 
that can be accessed by incoming 
officers and allows students to print 
extracurricular resumes. 

Luck said increased communi- 
cation with other universities in the 
region is also important, since many 
of those students face the same dif- 
ficulties as Northwestern students. 

Last week, NSU sent 20 represen- 
tatives to the Louisiana Association 
of College and University Personnel 
Administrators conference hosted 
by the University of Louisiana at 
Lafayette. 

Luck takes to heart her role as 
an advocate for Northwestern and its 
students and is preparing for NSU 
to host a meeting of the Council of 
Student Body Presidents Nov. 4-5, 
which will include representatives 
from the Board of Regents. 

"I care about the university and 
I felt that being involved in student 
government would provide valuable 
experience in working with people," 
she said. 



Carmel Bourg 
inspires 
others, 
everything 
good about 
the WRAC 



NSU News Bureau 



People do not get tired of 
feeling good," said Carmel 
Bourg, wellness coordinator 
at Northwestern State University's 
Wellness. Recreation and Activities 
Center (WRAC). In promoting the 
amenities at the WRAC, Bourg has 
been communicating the benefits of 
a healthy lifestyle throughout the 
community and encouraging people 
of all ages to engage in activities that 
promote wellness of body and mind. 



"The WRAC is a good resource, 
not only for the faculty, staff and 
students of Northwestern, but also 
for the community," she said. "We 
are an educational institution, so the 
WRAC is not just a gym. We have 
interns learning the latest in sports 
medicine. They are here to get the 
experience they need and we utilize 
that because they offer fresh ideas. 
We have graduate assistants who 
work as personal trainers and those 
who work with group exercise class- 
es. If a person has a specific goal, 



such as running a 5K or half-mara- 
thon, we can work with that individ- 
ual to develop a training program. 
We really are a resource center." 

Bourg began her job in July and, in 
addition to coordinating classes for 
group exercise and conducting indi- 
vidual fitness assessments, has been 
touting the benefits of the WRAC to 
groups throughout the community. 

"We have a lot of people from 
the community who come here ev- 
ery day," she said. "There are senior 
citizens who are excited to be here 



and some stay two or three hours. 
It helps them live the lifestyle they 
would like at this point. They can 
garden, walk with the grandkids and 
maintain a level of fitness so that 
they are able to enjoy life." 

Bourg promotes the varied classes 
offered at the WRAC, such as the 
tween and teen conditioning classes 
designed to develop core strength, 
endurance and flexibility for young- 
sters while addressing nutrition. The 
WRAC also offers group exercise 
classes in circuit training, yoga, pi- 



lates, spin, step and tone, as well as 
massage therapy and other programs 
related to health for all ages. 

"We offer people help to reach 
a healthy lifestyle, which ties back 
into using the WRAC as a resource. 
Being based an academic institution 
allows us to use our resources to 
help our patrons," Bourg said. 

Bourg learned what a valuable 



For rest of story: 
visit www.asudemons.com 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

91763° 



■ 



Thursday 

90760° 

.JiB bI# 



Friday 

88757° 



Saturday 

89762° 



Sunday 

92765° 



Monday 

92760° 



Tuesday 

87761° 




i 




Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 
September 28, 2011 



Up 'til Dawn, St. Jude Awareness Week focus on childhood cancer 



Yevette Wagoner 

Life editor 

Do you want to take part in 
helping end childhood 

cancer? 

Will you support NSU and 
St. Jude"s efforts? 

If so, Up 'til Dawn, (UTD) a 
NSU student-led, program in which 
college students raise funds and 
awareness for St. Jude's Children's 
Research Hospital, has a week long 
of ev ents planned to raise awareness 
and funds for St. Jude. 

Up 'til Dawn is one of the newer 
organizations brought to our cam- 
pus only two years ago, in 2009 and 
has already raised over $60,000. 

There are over 1 80 Up 'til Dawn 
organizations at colleges nationwide 
and coins the motto "cancer doesn't 
sleep, so neither should we." 

"The campus community is the 
most effective tool we can have in 
our efforts to unite and fight for the 
children who need it the most," Mi- 
chael Stevenson, assistant director 
of Up 'til Dawn, said. 

"A cure will not occur overnight, 
but our patience and continued 
commitment to help bring aware- 
ness and the necessary funds will 
continue to raise the survival rate of 
children diagnosed with cancer." 

Monday, NSU students witnessed 
the campus' first spelling bee, 
"Take a Chance for a Cure," in the 
Student Union Alley from 8 p.m. to 
10 p.m. 

The winners of the spelling bee 
were Ellie Spain and Arin Williams. 
They competed against 1 3 other 
students. 

Tuesday, "Give Cancer the Boot" 
raised $494.68, as members of 
Up 'til Dawn stood at the Student 



Union traffic light collecting money 
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

Wednesday night, there will be 
"Strike out Childhood Cancer" at 
the Country Lanes Bowling Alley 
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

The cost is $20 per person and 
includes three games plus bowling 
shoe rental. Students must register 
in teams of two. 

Tomorrow, Up 'til Dawn en- 
courages students to eat at Raising 
Cane's Chicken Fingers from 5:30 
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. For proceeds to go 
to St. .hide's, students must mention 
the charity when ordering. 

Friday, will be an "Up 'til Dawn 
Open House" for students interested 
in learning more about the organiza- 
tion and joining Up 'til Dawn. Light 
refreshments will be served in the 
UTD office in the Student Union, 
Room 100 from noon to 2 p.m. 

"Run 'til You're Done 5K" will 
start Saturday at the NSU Wellness 
and Recreation Complex from 8 
a.m. to 11 a.m. 

Registration costs are $15 for 
ages 13 and younger and $20 for 
ages 14 and older. Each registered 
student receives a free T-shirt. 

The week's events end Saturday 
with a "Carnival of Hope" tailgate 
from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. before the 
NSU vs. MSU football game. 

Concessions and carnival game 
tickets will be sold. 

McNeese State University's Up 
'til Dawn organization will join the 
tailgate to support St. Jude. 

"It's a wonderful cause and great 
opportunity for service hours. It is 
something that every student should 
experience during their college 
career," Stevenson said. 




Photo by Yevette Wagoner/ Current Sauce 
Pictured above are the two winners of the "Take a Chance for the Cure" Spelling Bee along with the Up 'til 
Dawn executive board. (Bottom Row) Left to right: Matthew Haskins, Ellie Spain, Arin Williams, Kendall 
Franklin, Angel Glover, Zech Jones (Top Row) Chase Powell, Michael Stephenson, Gabby Hughes, Nicole 
Koster, Cary Bruno 




Photo by Yevette Wagoner/Current Sauce 
Pictured above are Michael Stephenson, Up 'Til Dawn Assistant Director, and Kendall Franklin, Logistics 
Chairman, as they take part collecting money at the "Give Cancer the Boot" event Tuesday at the Student 
Union traffic light. 



Natchitoches 
Movie Times 

Parkway Conema 6 

1011 KeyserAve. 
(318)352-5109 

Abduction 

PG 13 
4:20 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 
9:30 p.m. 

Moneyball 

PG 13 
4:10 p.m. 
6:40 p.m. 
9:20 p.m. 

Contagion 

PG 13 
4:20 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 
9:30 p.m. 

I Don't Know 
How She Does It 

PG 13 
7:10 p.m. 

The Help 

PG 13 
5:00 p.m. 
8:00 p.m. 

Dolphin Tale 

PG 
4:10 p.m. 
6:50 p.m. 
9:20 p.m. 

Shark Night 

PG 13 
4:30 p.m. 
9:40 p.m. 



Top Ten Bizarre 
College Courses 

http://listverse.com/2009/09/30l 
top-IO-bizarre-college-courses/ 

1. The Phallus 

Occidental College 

2. The Art of 
Walking 

Centre College, Ken- 
tucky 

3. Maple Syrup: The 
Real Thing 

Alfred University in 
New York State 

4. Zombies 
University of 
Alabama at 
Tuscaloosa 

5. Philosophy and 
Star Trek 
Georgetown 
University 

6. The Art of Sin and 
the Sin of Art 

The Rhode Island 
School of Design 

7. The Joy of 
Garbage 

Virginia Matzek of 
Santa Clara 
University 

8. Stupidity 
Occidental College 

9. The Theology of 
Eating 

Loyola College 

10. The Unbearable 
Whiteness Of Barbie 

Occidental College 



Recipe of the Week 



Chelsea Giles 

Family and Conburr^ Science major 
Concentration in Culinart Afu> 

Cookies and 
Cream Cupcakes 

Yield: 24 cupcakes 

Ingredients: 
For the cupcakes: 

24 Oreo halves, with cream filling 
attached 

2'A cups all-purpose flour 
1 tsp. baking powder 
'A tsp. salt 

8 tbsp. unsalted butter, at room 
temperature 

1 2/3 cup sugar 

3 large egg whites, at room tem- 
perature 

2 tsp. vanilla extract 
I cup milk 

20 Oreo cookies, coarsely chopped 
(I quarter them) 

For the frosting: 

8 oz. cream cheese, at room tem- 
perature 

6 tbsp. unsalted butter, at room 
temperature 

1 tbsp. vanilla extract 

4 cups confectioners 'sugar, sifted 

2 tbsp. heavy cream 

For garnish: 

Oreo cookie crumbs 
24 Oreo cookie halves 

Directions: 

Preheat the oven to 350*F. Line 
two cupcake pans with 24 paper 
liners. 

Place an Oreo halve in the bot- 
tom of each liner, cream side up. 

In a medium bowl, combine the 
flour, baking powder and salt; stir 
together with a fork to blend and 
set aside. 



In the bowl of an electric mixer, 
••qmbine the butter and sugar and 
beat i^'* h er on medium-high 
speed until light uihj ?'' < fv. about 
2 minutes. 

Blend in the egg whites one at 
a time, beating well after each ad- 
dition. 

Blend in the vanilla extract. 
With the mixer on low speed, beat 
in half of the dry ingredients just 
until incorporated. 

Add the milk and beat just until 
combined, then mix in the remain- 
ing dry ingredients. 

Gently fold in the chopped 
Oreos with a rubber spatula until 
evenly incorporated, being careful 
not to over-mix. 

Evenly divide the batter be- 
tween the prepared cupcake liners. 
Bake for 18-20 minutes, rotating 
the pans halfway through baking, 
until a toothpick inserted in the 
center comes out clean. 

Allow to cool in the pans 5-10 
minutes, then transfer to a wire 
rack to cool completely. 

To make the frosting, combine 
the cream cheese and butter in 
the bowl of an electric mixer and 
beat on medium-high speed until 
smooth, about 1 minute. 

Blend in the vanilla extract. 
Beat in the confectioners' sugar 
until incorporated and smooth, 1-2 
minutes. 

Add the heavy cream to the 
bowl and beat on medium-low 
speed just until incorporated, then 
increase the speed to medium- 
high and whip for 4 minutes until 
light and fluffy, scraping down the 
sides of the bow l as needed. 

Frost the cooled cupcakes as de- 
sired. Sprinkle with Oreo crumbs 
and garnish with Oreo halves. 




— 



© Original Artist 
Reproduction rights obtainable from 
www. Ca rtoonStock.com 





o 



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Checking 




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Opinions 



thecurrentsauce@gmail. com 
September 28, 2011 



Freshman year overwhelming 



When I decided to come to 
Northwestern State Uni- 
versity, my exact thoughts 
were, "Freedom!" 

Actually attending college is 
something completely different. 

I have this new-found freedom 
along with a lot of responsibilities. 
Having to wash your own clothes, 
cook your own food and wake 
yourself up is definitely not every 
teenagers dream. 

As a freshman at Northwestern 
State, it has truly been a culture 
shock for me. 

Coming from a 5A high school 
in Lafayette, LA, there was always 
something to do and many people 
to see. After my first month at 
Northwestern, I realized how small 
Natchitoches really is. 

A few alumni and current stu- 
dents gave me the advice to stay in- 
volved by joining different clubs. In 
my third week of school, I decided 
to take advantage of this. 

On top of studying for my four 
week tests and getting used to living 
on my own, I tried to juggle four 
different clubs. 

In high school I was always 
very involved: national BETA club, 
yearbook, cheerleading, Academy 
of Business and Finance, a part time 
job and volunteer work. 




"They say college is the 
best four years of your life, 
so make it worth it!" 

- Kyla Winey 



So naturally I thought college 
would be the same. This theory 
proved to be very wrong! 

Once I started attending my 
classes and seeing how much work I 
had to put in to keep my grades up, 
I realized I was far from easy-going 
high school. 

In high school it seemed like 
studying was only an option. You 
went to class, paid attention and 
when test time came around you 
were well prepared. 



On the other hand, studying is 
mandatory in order to make above a 
C average in college. 

I started going to the different 
meetings for the clubs on campus 
and noticed that my study habits 
began to deteriorate. I was spending 
less time on homework and more 
time on extracurricular activities. 

I had to stand back, examine my 
situation and, unfortunately, scratch 
a few clubs off of the list. 

As a first semester freshman 



it was just too much to handle. I 
planned on joining several organi- 
zations while in college, but I've 
realized that I have to take it one 
step at a time. 

My advice to all of you first 
semester freshman is to take it easy, 
(ietting involved is the fun part, but 
make sure school work comes first 
and make the best of it. 

They say college is the best four 
years of your life, so make it worth 
it! 



The Spats 



/X WA5 THINKING OF V 
( PUTTING- HAIR 
V IN A BUN. V 

" V 



by Jeff Pickering 




f wwiwrr a ham- 

BUR&6K pwrr BE 
VJfof?E AfPROPRIATE?/ 



Just like Cats * Dogs b S p.«T.pfcip t * 



LAFF-A-DAY 



UH_I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT ANY Of THIS SAYS. 
BUT I HAVE A FEEUN6 1 WTU. BE HAPPIEST IF VOU 
SHOW HE THE FRENCH WORDS FOR "DAILY SPECIAL' 





"And were you surprised, sir. when your wife was 
chosen the Best-Dressed Woman of the Year?" 



HUBERT - - By Dick Wingert 



MISTER BREGER ByDave&reger 




"Pick us up in about ten minutes, Ethel." 




Your education 
too generalized 



h: 



Tom H Lawler 

Staff Columnist 



"ere is 
what 
stinks: 
general 
education 
courses. 

Most of 
us here have 
a clear idea 
of the things 
we would 
like to do in 
future career 
paths, or at the very least, we know 
the things we like to learn about. 

Despite our interests, we are 
forced, against logic, to take in con- 
siderable amounts of 'fluff.' 

General Education (from here 
on out referred to as GE, or fluff) is 
supposed to make students intellec- 
tually well rounded and hopefully 
provide insight to academic paths. 

My sentiment is that it only 
serves as an annoyance and a trap 
against good GPA's. 

During high school and junior 
high, the average student takes 
between 25 and 35 hours of class. 
Additionally, most students are in- 
volved in extra curricular activities. 

Therefore, it is quite likely that 
one would have taken several math, 
english, history and science classes. 

So why is it that our first year 
and a half of a university education 
is spent repeating ourselves with 
fluff from previous years? Frustrat- 
ing, is it not? 

I have seen the other side of the 
academic pond. The reason why 
Asians and Europeans seem smarter 
is because they waist less time. 

Take England, for example. After 
completing secondary school (simi- 
lar to junior high and high school), 
a student then goes on to what is 
called 'A Levels'. At 'A Levels' you 
take a maximum of three or four 



certain kinds of classes. 

So if you prefer math, science 
and music, then that is ALL YOU 
TAKE. At a university, you only 
take one of your A Level classes 
for a major (perhaps a second as a 
minor). 

By the time an English student 
is 19 years old, he or she is already 
well on his way to becoming an ex- 
pert in Major XYZ than an Ameri- 
can counterpart in Major XYZ. 

Oh, by the way, the American, 
while studying XYZ, is repeating 
himself with ABC. 

These GE classes are more likely 
to lower students' GPA. If a student 
is more passionate in chemistry than 
psychology, then the majority effort 
will undoubtedly go to the former. 

Chemistry students pass in- 
troductory chemistry classes than 
introductory psychology classes. 
People try harder if it is something 
they enjoy. 

For me, the three or so classes 
I have dropped or received C's 
in have all been fluffy tuffy GE 
classes. 

I will provide a solution. Com- 
bine the GE classes to make more 
interesting interdisciplinary courses. 

If chemistry and algebra were 
combined (after taking both sepa- 
rately in high school) the student 
would be refreshed, but also learn 
how things are related. 

Combine American history w ith 
political science. 

Or let students choose from 
general education courses like elec- 
tives. 

A four-year degree is at least 
one-quarter fluff. 

The more one would fill a pillow 
or degree with fluff, then the more 
it lacks in supporting our brains at 
night, or in our future. 



The 

CurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
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Try Squares w 



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Without rotating the small squares on the right, try to arrange them into 
the pattern shown in the diagram at the left so that the number next to 
each large triangle equals the sum of the four numbers in that triangle. 




24 





25 



26 



27 




© 201 1 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



Try Squares 

answer 



Letter Box IT 

Place a letter in the empty boxes in such a way 
that each row across, each column down and each 
small 9-dox square contains all of the letters listed 
above the diagram. When completed, the row 
indicated will spell out a word or words. 

BEF I NOVWY 



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The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
September 28, 2011 



34-0 

Demon football wins back 'NSU Trophy' 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Demon receiver T.C. Henry secures a long pass from junior quarterback Brad Henderson. NSU beat Nicholls 

34-0, 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

An offensive eruption lead by 
quarterback Brad Henderson 
catapulted the Demons 34-0 
over Nicholls, Saturday afternoon in 
Thibodaux, La. 

Henderson's three-touchdown 
performance-all in the first quarter- 
helped NSU football secure its 500 lh 
victory since the program started 
in 1907. NSU's overall record is 
squared away at 2-2 and while 
conference record is 1-0. 

The Southland Conference win 
was just what the team needed 
to turn things around after losing 
convincingly to LSU and SMU. 

"That's a confidence booster, 
when you come out and put up 
points against a very good Nicholls 
defense after struggling the last two 
weeks against two great defenses," 
I lenderson said. "We had a great 
plan, we believed in each other, and 
we executed pretty well." 

The Demons delivered the first 
blow with 10:06 left on the clock 
when Henderson connected with 



receiver JaMarcus Williams for a 
nine-yard touchdown pass. 

The play capped off a 44-yard 
drive, which was sparked by an 
interception from Demon linebacker 
Derek Rose. 

"As a defense we felt that we 
needed to come out and prove that 
we can be a real dominant defense 
within this league," Rose said. 

The Colonels' next drive ended 
the same way with another turnover. 
This time. Demon comerback 
Jeremy Lane forced Nicholls 
State's Jorda Arcement to fumble 
after catching a pass for Laquintin 
Caston. 

The Demons added two more 
scores before the start of the second 
quarter. The first score came when 
Henderson found another target 
in Tucker Nims for a two-yard 
touchdown pass. 

A quick three-and-out on the 
ensuing Colonel offensive drive 
gave the Demons one final chance 
to score before halftime. Henderson 
connected once more, this time with 
receiver T.C. Henry for a 48-yard 
strike that pushed the lead to three 
scores. 



"Their secondary is one of their 
weak points and we tried to attack 
that a lot," Henderson said. Things 
were open and we were able to 
execute just like practice." 

The Purple Swarm defense 
continued stifling all Colonel 
offensive opportunities in the 
second half. A fumble recovery by 
Rose led to more Demon points. 
Kicker John Shaughnessy nailed a 
21 -yard field goal five minutes into 
the third quarter. 

The Demons delivered the 
knockout blow shortly after 
when Palmer scored a one-yard 
touchdown run. 

NSU's defense held Nicholls to 
1 2 first downs for the entire game. 

The Demons improved on the 
ground as well, netting 206 yards on 
46 total attempts. D.J. Palmer led 
all Demon rushers with 1 2 attempts 
for 79 yards and one touchdown. 
Henderson followed him with a 
7-carry, 59-yard performance of his 
own. 

The Demons' next game is at 
Turpin Stadium against SLC rival, 
McNeese State University. Kickoff 
is Saturday at 6 p.m. 




f <C' EVERY TifWE I 
H \^MV MARRIA6E- 






@ NSU 
Cigarettes and the 

Enviroment! 



No butts 
about it 
this is litter. 




"The 470 billion 
cigarettes smoked in the 
United States in 1998 
translates to a total of 
176,250,000 pounds of 
discarded butts in one 
year in the United States 
alone." 

(www.longwood.edu) 



LEASE BUTT IT, THEN BIN IT. 

njjjft i A- mmJOt *—» 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Paul Harris was inserted into the Demon starting lineup as a true freshman. He was suspended for his mis- 
conduct during NSU's home opener. 

Former starting quarterback Paul Harris reinstated to Demon squad 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Northwestern State football 
coach Bradley Dale Peveto 
said Monday he has reinstated 
former starting quarterback 
Paul Harris to the Demons' team, 
ending a suspension which began at 
halftime of NSU's Sept. 1 season- 
opening win over Delta State. 

Harris, a junior, was indefinitely 
suspended for conduct detrimental 
to the team after outbursts on the 
sideline and in the locker room dur- 
ing halftime of the Delta State game. 

He has been excluded from all 
team activities since he was ban- 



ished to the stands by Peveto before 
the third quarter began on Sept. 1 . 

Harris, who has started 1 4 games 
including the 201 1 opener for North- 
western since the last four games of 
his true freshman season in 2009, 
will be evaluated in practice this 
week as the Demons (2-2 overall, 
1-0 in the Southland Conference) 
play rival McNeese State (No. 1 8 na- 
tionally, 2-1 overall, 1-0 in the SLC) 
Saturday evening at 6 in NSU's Tur- 
pin Stadium. 

Junior college transfer Brad Hen- 
derson, who entered the Delta State 
game on the Demons' third offensive 
series in a pre-determined rotation, 



has sparkled since. 

He guided NSU back from a 1 7-0 
halftime deficit to a win over Delta 
State, and has completed 69 per- 
cent of his 80 passes with only one 
interception and four touchdowns 
this month. He remains the Demons' 
starting quarterback. 

"Paul made a big mistake and has 
paid a big price. Paul has missed a 
third of our season. He has lost his 
starting job. He had a list of condi- 
tions and requirements to meet to 



For rest of story: 
visit www.nsudemons.com 




Great Prices 
First Class Tuxes 
Hometown Customer Service 





713 KEYSER AVENUE • NATCHITOCHES, LA 




Wednesday, October 12, 2011 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Northwestern State University 

Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 6 



Northwestern State alumni 
named to Long Purple Line 



NSU News Bureau 

Seven Northwestern State Uni- 
versity alumni have been 
named to the NSU Alumni Hall 
of Distinction, the Long Purple Line 
for 2011. 

This year's inductees are Don 
and Virginia Burkett of Many, Dr. 
F. Gary Cunningham of Dallas, Dr. 
Walter Ledet Jr. of Sulphur, Barbara 
Spruill Moffett and Randy Moffett 
of Baton Rouge and Winnie Dowden 
Wyatt of Grapevine, Texas. The in- 
ductees will be honored at the an- 
nual Homecoming Banquet on Fri- 
day, Oct. 1 4 and at the Homecoming 
football game against Southeastern 
Louisiana University on Saturday, 
Oct. 1 5. Out of more than 75,000 
Northwestern State alumni, only 
104 people have been chosen for 
this honor. 

Don Burkett is a graduate of 
Northwestern State in political sci- 
ence. After obtaining a law degree, 
he began a legal career in Many 
where he served as a public de- 
fender for two years. In 1 984 he was 
elected district attorney for Sabine 
and DeSoto Parishes and has been 
re-elected to four consecutive terms 
without opposition. 

Burkett is a past president of the 
Louisiana District Attorney's Asso- 
ciation and has served on numerous 
statewide boards and commissions. 



Ora C. Williams 
/"dm. Ronald J. Haves 
William J. "Pill" Dod'd , 
Ham/ Tags" Turpin 
Dr. Carolyn Leach Huntoon 
Maj. Cen. Troon W, 



Gen. Claire Lee Ghent; 
Dr. Z 1 mold Kilpatrick 
Mrs. Joanna Mac-ale 
Karl W. Moore 



Dudley FultorN*. 
□ise P. James 
Larry W. Rivers 
Col. Ralph E. Ropp 
Joe Sampite 
Jackie Smith 



Melva Juanita Martinez Coutee 
^^^^Maxine Roqe Johnson 
If 1 Dr. Robert iftlost 
III EHis Coutee 

John R. McConathy 
Ken Moran 
^*s. Tom F. Phillips 



20 



He is currently serving on the Loui- 
siana Commission on Law Enforce- 
ment and the Northwest Law En- 
forcement Planning C ommission. 
He also serves as secretary for the 
North Louisiana Crime Lab board 
where he has been instrumental in 
obtaining funding for a state-of-the- 
art laboratory to be constructed ad- 
jacent to the LSU Health Sciences 
Center. 

Don Burkett was a past recipient 
of the J. H. Cain Law Enforcement 
Award given by the Louisiana Moral 
and Civic Foundation for high moral 



principles in the law enforcement 
community. Burkett is known as a 
hands-on district attorney who has 
successfully prosecuted hundreds 
of cases himself ranging from drug 
charges to capital murders. Don and 
Virginia Burkett have both been ac- 
tive in community and church affairs 
and host an annual NSU recruiting 
function. 

Virginia Burkett received her 
bachelor's and master's degrees 
from Northwestern and her doctoral 
degree in forestry from Stephen F. 
Austin State University. She is chief 



Graphic by Alison Roberts 

scientist for global change research 
at the U.S. Geological Survey. Vir- 
ginia Burkett was formerly chief of 
the Forest Ecology Branch at the 
USGS National Wetlands Research 
Center in Lafayette. 

Virginia Burkett was the first fe- 
male in the United States to be ap- 
pointed director of a state fish and 
wildlife department when she was 
appointed secretary of the Louisiana 



For the rest of the story, visit 
www.nsucurrenlsauce.com 



6 to be honored by 
College of Education and 
Human Development 





person 




The Northwestern Stat 
Development will induct 
Educators and one as a Fr 
coming Festivities. 

Oct. 1 5 in the Teacher Edi 
For more information > 

\v\vvv.risuc'urrehtsaucc.cb'i 



No risk-free level of exposure 
to secondhand smoke 



Submitted by Fresh Campus 

The issue of secondhand smoke 
has received a lot of press lately 
with many cities and colleges 
across the country passing 100 per- 
cent smoke-free laws to protect in- 
dividuals from involuntary exposure 
to it. 

But many NSU students ask why 
the fuss over secondhand smoke ex- 
posure — isn't the real danger to the 
smokers themselves? 

While smokers do put themselves 
at greater risk for tobacco-related 
diseases, the dangers of secondhand 
smoke are real and nothing to be dis- 
missed. 

While we don't often think of 
children or adolescents being on 
NSU's campus, it is important to 
keep in mind that there are three 
K-12 schools housed on our cam- 
pus: NSU Elementary Laboratory 
School, NSU Middle Laboratory 
School, and the Louisiana School 
for the Math, Sciences, and the Arts. 

These K-12 students can be ex- 
posed to secondhand smoke on the 
NSU campus when they are on the 
playground, walking the campus for 
field trips and participating in after- 
school activities such as running 
club. 

The students at the Louisiana 



School live in residence halls on 
NSU's campus and utilize other 
campus facilities where they can be 
exposed. 

In addition, adolescents from the 
community can be exposed to sec- 
ondhand smoke on campus when 
they take part in numerous high 
school sporting events, musical and 
dance recitals, summer camps, 5K 
races and other activities held at 
NSU. 

In light of all of the dangers asso- 
ciated with exposure to secondhand 
smoke, passage of a 100 percent 
smoke-free campus policy is the best 
way to create a healthier campus en- 
vironment. 

It will protect all students and ad- 
olescents frequenting campus from 
involuntary exposure to secondhand 
smoke. 

Show your support for passage 
of a 100 percent smoke-free cam- 
pus policy at NSU by signing the 
Fresh Campus' student petition on 
the Fresh Campus at NSU Facebook 
page. 



For more information on the 
Fresh Campus organization and 
what you can do to help make 
your campus fresh, visit Fresh 
Campus at NSU on Facebook. 



Quick Facts 

• There is no risk-free level 
of exposure to secondhand 
smoke and breathing even a 
little secondhand smoke can 
be harmful to your health. 

Secondhand smoke con- 
tains many chemicals that can 
quickly irritate and damage 
the lining of the airways even 
if exposure to it is very brief. 

• Persons with asthma or 
other respiratory conditions 
are at especially high risk for 
being affected by secondhand 
smoke and should take special 
precautions to avoid second- 
hand smoke exposure. 

• Secondhand smoke also 
causes cancer and heart dis- 
ease in nonsmokers. 

• Children exposed to sec- 
ondhand smoke are at an in- 
creased risk for respiratory in- 
fections, ear problems, more 
severe asthma, and slower 
lung growth. 

Source: 2006 report by U.S. 
Surgeon General 



Index 



2 Life 

4 Opinions 

5 Sports 



Wednesday 

91763° 



Thursday 

90°/60° 



Friday 

88757° 






4SU News Bureau Photo 



FACS will host Centennial reception Saturday 

NSU News Bureau 

The Northwestern State University Department of Family and Consumer Sciences will host an open 
house from 11 a.m. -noon Saturday, Oct. 15 as part of Homecoming Festivities. The open house will com- 
memorate the 100th anniversary of the Department. 

The Department of Domestic Science and Art was founded at Northwestern State in 19', 1 as an expansion 
of courses in weaving and textiles. The program became the Department of Home Economics in 1914 and 
was later renamed the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences. 

Over the decades, graduates have made significant contributions to their families and communities 
through work in home management, home economics education, early childhood education, nutrition and 
dietetics, travel and tourism, culinary arts and consumer education.. 

The Department's centennial reception will be held in the Family and Consumer Sciences building. For 
more information, call (318) 357-5587. 

For more information on other Homecoming festivies and events, visit www.nsula.edu for a complete 
schedule. 



Saturday 

89762° 



Sunday 

92765° 



Monday 

92760° 



Tuesday 

87°/61° 





Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 

October 12, 2011 



Week's Activities 




Above, Phi Mu Fraternity, Afton Owens (left), junior English Education 
major and Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, Jillian Corder(right), junior 
journalism major compete in the corn dog eating contest. 



- 



^^t^ ^"^Plil 





Above are new members of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity singing karaoke 
to "Sweet Caroline" by Neil Diamond at the Student Activities Board 
"Open Mic Night" on Monday. Members are (left to right) Tyler Hold- 
sworth, Chase Boudreaux, Beaux Bare and Michael Monsour. 
Left is Lloyd Meekins representing the Student Theater Organization 
singing "A Song for You," acapella. 



Pictured above, Claire Laurent, Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority member, 
earned points for her organization when she sang "Someone Like 
You" by Adele at Monday's homecoming event, "Open Mic Night." 
Below, members of Louisiana Scholars College show off the cupcakes 
they made. (Left to right) Deanna Bourgeois, Jake Roby and Megan 
Duhon. 





NSU Up 'Til Oawn organization makes a statement with their rendition of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital logo with their cupcakes. 



)ner 
litor 
edu 
Oil 




Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student. nsula.edu 

October 12, 2011 




■ i 





■ 




Photos by Yevette Wagoner/Current Sauce 



2010-2011 Miss NSU/Homecoming 
Queen talks of sweet times at NSU 

Above, Amy Dodson, 2010-2011 Miss NSU and Homecoming Queen stands with cupcakes made by Phi Mu 
Fraternity. Dodson leaves advice for the 2011-2012 Homecoming Court, "...College goes by in the blink of 
an pye. so imagine how quick this one week of your college experience will go by... know you are blessed 
nnH when you're walking across the field this Saturday point your nose towards the crowd and thank them 
for placing you where you are standing... Every penny spent on outfits, jewelry, haircuts was more than 
worth it. This week will be priceless. See you on the field." 

ight: Students Lauren Daniels and Dakota Butts pose with their caricatures at the block party. 
Middle right: Homecoming Queen, Ruth Fruge', excitedly awaits falling into the dunking booth. 
Bottom right: Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity shows off their pumpkin spice cupcakes which were entered into 
the cupcake war contest. 




Today 

Lip Sync and Homecoming Hunnies 
competition 

A.A. Fredrick's Auditorium 

7 p.m. 

Open to all Students 
Student organizations showcase talents 
by choreographed dance and by lip 
syncing words of You Tube videos 

Tomorrow 

Ying Yang Twins concert 
A.A. Fredrick's Auditorium 

8 p.m. 

NSU students only 

Tickets are $ 1 and can be purchased at 
wu w.nsutickets.com and can be picked 
up in Room 102 in the Student Union 
from Yonna Pasch, director of Student 
Activities 
Musical concert 

Friday 

Homecoming Parade 
Starts on campus and routes to down- 
town Natchitoches 
5:30 p.m. 

Open to students and members of the 
community 

The parade will feature NSU spirit 
groups, campus organizations and 
Homecoming Honors Court. 

Demon Pep Rally 

Downtown Natchitoches Riverbank 
Directly following the Homecoming 
parade 

Open to students and members of the 
community 

NSU cheerleaders, Purple Pizazz Pom 
Line and Demon Dazzlers will be per- 
forming before Coach Peveto gives his 
pep talk to the NSU football team. 

Saturday 

Homecoming week organization awards 
NSU tailgating field 
3 p.m. 

Open to students and members of the 
community 

Awards for all homecoming competi- 
tions will be announced. 

NSU vs. Southeastern State University 
homecoming football game 
Turpin Stadium 
6 p.m. 

Open to NSU students and members of 
the community 

Free for students with student ID, $8 for 
general admission seating 




ation 




Fun, service mark 
week's events 



es. 



2011 Homecoming Honor Court 



Submitted photo 

Pictued above is the 2011 Northwestern State University Homecoming Honors Court. Top row (left to right) is Cameron Tillman, Kevin Blake, 
J.D. Hadden, Ryan Owens, Carderius "CJ" Johnson, Homecoming King: Chase Stepp, Patrick Brooks, Solomon Matthews, Jackson McNeal 
and Austin McCann. Front row (left to right) Tiffany Hudson, Hope McFarland, Maegan Morace, Megan Cullen, Brittany Jeanice, Homecoming 
Queen: Ruth Fruge', Shannon Byrd, Lauren Waguespack, Arielle Craige and Afton Owens. 

"coming Honor Court will be presented at halftime at this Saturday's Homecoming football game. 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life editor 

Monday, the Student 
Activities Board hosted 
an "Open Mic Night" in 
The Alley of Friedman's 
Student Union. 

This event gave organizations 
the opportunity to sing karaoke 
and gain participation points to go 
toward their overall Homecoming 
score for the week. 

The Student Activ ities Board 
calculates these points at the 
end of the week and awards the 
Registered Student Organization 
\\ ith the most points, the "Overall 
Homecoming Winners" award. 

"Homecoming is a time for 
each organization to show their 
support for our entire university. 
It celebrates our athletics, our 
alumni and our student population 
as a w hole," Phi Mu president, 
Meredith Richard, senior. Biology 
major said. 

"Homecoming Week is a time 
for organizations to showcase their 
talents. Richard said. "That's why 
I think it is so competitive. It's not 
necessarily about competing with 
others, but more like competing 
with yourself. 

Everyone strives to put in that 
extra effort during this special 
time to show they really care and 
hav e what it takes." 

This week, the Peer Leadership 
Program will be hosting "Cana- 
palooza," a canned food drive 
competition. 

Winners of the "Canapalooza" 
competition will be awarded a S50 
gift card from CLV. 

All canned food items collected 
will go to the local food bank 
which supports the Natchitoches 
community. 

"I think collecting canned goods 
is a great way that Homecoming 
Week benefits our community. It's 



something simple that goes a long 
way," Richard said. 

Last year, Phi Mu Fraternity- 
won the canned food drive, and 
they donated over 2,500 canned 
food items. 

Life Share Blood Center has 
been in the Student Union circle 
drive for the l st annual Demon 
Blood Drive during Homecoming 
Week since Monday. 

One Demon Blood Award will 
be given to the organization with 
the most participation. Another 
Demon Blood Award will be 
given to the organization with the 
highest percentage of members' 
participation. 

Yesterday, a block party on 
Keyser's Brickway gave NSU 
students a time to enjoy free food 
such as cotton candy, sno cones 
and pop corn as well as take part 
in fun activities. 

A dunking booth was set up 
which allowed students to dunk 
members of the Homecoming 
Honors Court. 

"Working on Homecoming 
Week 20 1 1 has been a learning 
experience. Being on the other 
side of planning an event makes 
me much more appreciative of 
how much hard work goes into an 
event," SAB member, Victoria 
Hippler, said. 

There was also a cupcake bake- 
off varying from pumpkin spice 
flavors to cupcakes that looked 
like vegetables. 

The winning cupcake receipe 
will be announced at Saturday's 
organization Homecoming awards 
ceremony. 

Awards will be given at 3 p.m. at 
Turpin Stadium tailgating field on 
Saturday. 




Opinions 



thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
October 12, 2011 



Rants: Confusion Over Homecoming 




i 



Tom H. Lawler 

Opinions Coulmnist 

s Home- 
coming 
nothing 
fmore than a 
distraction from 
the true and 
inoble purpose 
|of academic 
jinstitutions? Or 
lis it the embodi- 
ment of spirit as 
the collective student body pro- 
motes its own glory? 

First, does Homecoming mean 
anything? I am now in my fourth 
year and I cannot tell you who won 
the game, who was king and queen 
or even what I did instead of any 
Homecoming week activity so far. 

Did it dramatically alter the 
course of your life, or even those 
who won the game or became king 
and queen, respectively? 

Probably not. Yet, we would 
have to ask them. You would need 
to ask yourself that question, also. 

Now. I understand that some of 
you out there are majoring in Tri 
Sigma with a concentration in Bour- 
bon Creek. Or perhaps just bourbon. 

I am guessing that if the above 
sounds like you, then maybe you 
can be so kind as to enlighten me. 
You may even leave me comments 
on our website. Just answer the 
question 'What is Homecoming all 
about?' 

Homecoming is supposed to 
celebrate alumni returning home, 
school spirit, and of course, pag- 
eantry. 

Primarily, have you ever seen the 
alumni association pull anything off 
other than send you 'letters'? Have 
you ever heard of alumni returning 
back to do. . . whatever they would 



Campus Talk: Seniors reflect on NSU experiences 



"/ like how involved stu- 
dents get for Homecoming. 
It the one time a year that 
students really support and 
attend all the events. I m 
going to miss that. I haven 't 
been able to be as involved 
as I liked to because of 
work, but I've been involved 
as much as I can. This is the 
most fun week of school. " 

Amber Neikirk 

Senior journalism major 



"I'll miss all the activities 
that go on throughout the 
week. Tailgating for Home- 
coming is the best ever! Frat 
brothers, family and friends 
all come out to support and 
have a wonderful time. I'll 
enjoy my last Homecoming! " 

Patrick Bennett 

Senior nursing major 



"Homecoming week is such 
an exciting time for every- 
one, and I feel like our cam- 
pus truly comes together 
because of all the activities 
during the week and all of 
the alumni that come to tail- 
gating and the Homecoming 
game. " 

Taylor Graves 

Senior journalism major 



GO FIGURE! b * 



The idea of Go Figure is to arrive 
at the figures given at the bot- 
tom and right-hand columns of 
the diagram by following the 
arithmetic signs in the order 
they are given (that is, from left 
to right and top to bottom). Use 
only the numbers below the 
diagram to complete its blank 
squares and use each of the 
nine numbers only once. 



DIFFICULTY: ★ ★ 



* Moderate * * Difficult 
*** GO FIGURE! 



Linda Thistle 




1 23345789 



O 201 1 K>nq Featires Synocaie. Ine 



do if they returned for a brief visit? 
I sure cannot think of anything sub- 
stantial enough to celebrate. 

Second, what exactly does 
school spirit mean? Does it mean 
that our students are filled with 
demons? If so, the BCM has a tough 
dilemma ahead of them. 

School spirit has to be more 
than a competition for who has 
more NSU passion. It also has to 
take pride in more than a collegiate 
color scheme or a mascot. 

It must be some sort of pride, 
though. Perhaps it is pride over 
what you and the university have 
endeared to each other. As you gain 
in knowledge towards a degree or 
career, you all the while build the 
reputation of this place. Is this the 
pride we celebrate? 

As you can tell, what we do 
during Homecoming is a bit confus- 
ing. For example, what do the Ying 
Yang Twins have in common with 



Vic the Demon? How is a football 
game between our Demons and 
Southeastern any more special than 
playing Stephen F. Austin? 

Dear reader, you only have to 
continue with this train of thought 
and further discrepancies arise. 

Finally, there is the issue 
pertaining to the pageantry of the 
week. I suppose it is fun to see 
beautiful and nice people dressed 
splendidly. Then again, I have seen 
you in pajamas for a 3 p.m. class. 
Truthfully, I am biased. I loathe 
parades. Yet, the prettiness and the 
peacock feathers is further disso- 
nance, especially for a university 
that lacks a motto. 

Perhaps our motto ought to be 
"Confusus et Laetus," (Confused 
and Colorful). 

As students, are you not busy 
enough? Do you have time to pry 
yourself from your work to hold 
and attend such events? 



Perhaps it is just more tanta- 
lizing things to do. Or is it more 
noise to distract you from academic 
progress. 

Being excited and proud of one 
thing should not distract you from 
that thing's actual purpose or func- 
tion. 

Yes, we are a school with a fight 
song and attractive people, but first 
and foremost, we are a school. We 
are a school of secondary education 
with intent to prepare individuals 
towards a career, mind you. 

When this week comes into his- 
tory, I will only make a note that it 
was Homecoming; Life will go on. 
I will try to be concerned about the 
implications of Homecoming, be 
they social or spiritual. All I ask is 
that we consider what we are doing 
and why we do it in the first place. 

Whatever Homecoming is, it 
sure is confusing. 



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ctober 
11 is 
National 
Coming 
)ut Day. 

The Human 
tights Cam- 
"paign first des- 
ignated this day in 1988 as a way to 
celebrate the LGBT community. 

Coming out is often the hardest 
thing that a gay person will have to 
do, because they will have to tell 
their loved ones that they have been 
harboring a secret for most of their 
lives. 

Often, when someone "comes 
out" it is not a shock to the people 
closest to them. They might have 
noticed that you haven't had that 
many relationships or you might ad- 
here to a few gay stereotypes. A guy 
might like musical theater. While 
a girl might pay more attention to 
a sports team than her makeup. Of 
course, these stereotypes are wrong 
and sometimes offensive, but they 
are still used to label people. 

When someone comes out to 
you, whether you expected it or not, 
the most important thing to remem- 
ber is to be supportive. You might 
have always known, or it might 
be a total shock, but this person is 
letting you know a secret that they 
have been keeping for most of their 
lives. They are trusting you with 
the deepest part of themselves and 



hoping that you will be open and 
accepting of them. 

It is important to ask the right 
questions. If you are of the same 
sex, never ask them if they've 
ever "been into you" or anything 
of that nature. If you are as close 
a friend as they believe you to be, 
you should know they have never 
been attracted to you. If they were, 
they certainly would not be telling 
you this secret for fear of how you 
might react. Instead, tell the person 
that you love them, and that means 
you love everything about them. Let 
them know that your relationship 
will not change. 

The biggest worry that gay 
people suffer is the unknown. They 
have spent years in the closet con- 
stantly wondering what will happen 
if the people that they love most 
will be unable to accept them. 

The truth is that most people will 
be very open when their friends or 
family members come out. For fur- 
ther information on National Com- 
ing Out Day and the Human Rights 
Campaign, visit the HRC website at 
http://www.hrc.org. 

NSU has a LAMBDA organiza- 
tion with students who are more 
than willing to speak with you. 



For the rest 
of the article, visit 
vvww.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Dynomite: Can I get hyped now? 




t; 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

ihe San 
Francisco 
49ers 
have an 
unexpected 
4-1 record that 
is blowing 
everyone's mind. Nobody would 
hav e thought that the team would 
be sitting comfortably in the NFL 
power ranking. 

Currently, the Niners are ranked 
ninth according to ESPN. And that 
ranking could have been higher if 
the second-half meltdown against 
the Cowboys never happened. 
Last week, the team was ranked 
16*. That's the biggest jump in the 
pow er ranking of any NFL team. 

After beating the Tampa Bay 
Buccaneers by 45 points, I'm 
surprised that more people aren't 
starting to believe that the Gold 
Rush of the late 80's and early 90's 
are back in full effect. We are one 
of the few teams that could clinch 
a playoff spot by mid-November. 
All we have to do is win four more 
games. 

Most people overlook the 
previous statements and focus on 
the quarterback issue. They're still 



belittling the play of Alex Smith. 
Everyone needs to understand 
that the guy had a new offensive 
coordinator nearly every year since 
the beginning of his football career. 
That's like being a rookie over and 
over again. 

This year is different. Yes, the 
offensive coordinator is new and 
so is the head coach, but he has an 
offensive-minded head coach in Jim 
Harbaugh. 

Smith's quarterback rating for 
this week is one of the highest 
of any NFL quarterback. He 
completed 11 of 19 passes for 170 
yards and three touchdowns. That 



performance earned him a NFL 
rating of 1 27.9 for the game ( 1 04. 1 
overall). He currently has one 
blemish on his stat book and that is 
the one interception thrown in the 
loss against the Cowboys. 

That's enough of Smith. I drag 
on about him because he and the 
quarterback spot has been the 
Achilles heel of the 49ers. You 
can understand how I feel about 
our success on the offensive side 
of the ball. I never question how 
productive our offense would be. 



For the rest 
of the article, visit 
www.nsucurrentsauce.coin 



^Gooooooooo DEMONS! 

MIMI'S 4t aJ ^ wut ^SHOP 

A. 



MM I 
E MOWN 
STORE 



(Under New Ownership) 

OPEN 
Monday - Saturday 
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM 



352-9140 

319 Dixie Plaza • Natchitoches. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 



1 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
October 12, 2011 



SFA defeats Lady Demons soccer 5-0 

Matthew Fowler 

Sauce Reporter 



The Northwestern State Lady 
Demon soccer team dropped 
its second game in a row and 
third of four after a 5-0 whipping 
from Stephen F. Austin in Southland 
Conference action on Sunday. 

It was the worst loss suffered by 
NSU since the 2005 season when 
Texas A&M beat the Lady Demons, 
7-0, in the NCAA tournament. 

"SFA is an extremely talented 
team, maybe one of the best I've 
seen in my years in the Southland 
Conference," said head coach Jim- 
my Mitchell. 

"With that said, we made a lot 
of mistakes that we need to correct." 

The Lady Demons (7-7, 1-3 
SLC) were dominated on the field 
and were outshot by a 28-7 margin 
in the second biggest offensive out- 
burst from the Ladyjacks (9-2-1,4-0 
SLC) this season. Fourteen of SFA's 
28 shots were on goal. 

The goals for the Ladyjacks start- 
ed early with a goal from freshman 
forward Chelsea Raymond in the 
fifth minute put SFA up 1-0. 

Senior forward Janae Lee added 
a goal in the 30th minute to push the 

The Spats 



-Mb 



> 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Demon forward Meghan Hunter avoids a tackle from the defender 



Ladyjacks to 2-0 for her fourth goal 
of the season. She also added an as- 
sist to Kylie Louw in the final goal 
of the game. 

Laura Sadler, sister of former 
Lady Demon Sarah Sadler, scored 
her sixth goal of the season to put 
SFA up 3-0 on an unassisted goal. 

Raymond then scored her second 
goal of the game and ninth of the 
season when she broke away in open 
field and scored in the 48th minute 
putting the Lady Demons down four. 

"They are just a very dangerous 
team and score in any opportunity," 
said Mitchell. 

Northwestern State goalkeeper 



Jessica Danku was kept very busy 
with saving seven goals to push her 
conference leading saves up to 66 on 
the season, six shy of her career high 
and season total a year ago of 72. 

Christian Marks came into the 
game in the 61st minute and col- 
lected one save and gave up on goal. 

Northwestern State collected 
two shots on goal coming from two 
freshmen in Alex Petermann and Ju- 
lia Ranalli. 

The Lady Demons return home 
Friday night at 7 o'clock to continue 
conference play with Texas State 
who defeated Texas-San Antonio 
Sunday. 



by Jeff Pickering 



(5RANPPA, I WISH I 
KNEW YOU WHEN 
yoO WKEYoUN&ER, 





You pip// 

..YOO KNEW ME TEN 
MINUTE* ACjO^ 





m 




@ NSU 



There is NO Risk-Free 
Level of Exposure to 
Secondhand Smoke 



According to a 2006 report by the U.S. Surgeon 
General, secondhand smoke is responsible for: 

• Damaging the lining of the airways and 
triggering asthma attacks even with very 
brief exposure; 

• Causing respiratory infections, ear problems, 
more severe asthma, and slower lung growth 
in children; 

• Causing cancer and heart disease. 

Help create a healthier campus environment that 
protects the health of all students and adolescents on 
campus by signing the student petition in support of 
a 100% smoke-free campus policy posted on the 
Fresh Campus at NSU Facebook page. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Sophomore Demon running back D.J. Palmer breaks into the open field on a screen pass. 

Demons dominate Cardinals 



Courtsey of Sports Info: 

Like the surge of electricity that 
blew the transformers near La- 
mar's Provost Umphrey Stadi- 
um earlier in the day. Northwestern 
State sizzled decisively for a short 
period in a 37-1 7 Southland Confer- 
ence football win Saturday night. 

Northwestern kicked into gear 
with a 20-point second quarter, scor- 
ing three touchdowns in the final 1 
minutes before halftime. The De- 
mons had 200 yards in the second 
period alone and a 27-7 halftime ad- 
vantage. 

That burst contained the great- 
est jolts in an elegantly efficient 
290-yard, three touchdowns, and 26 
of 34 with no interceptions passing 
performance by Brad Henderson, 
and effectively carried NSU to a 
2-1 league record and a 3-3 overall 
worksheet heading into next Sat- 
urday night's homecoming game 
against Southeastern Louisiana in 
Turpin Stadium. 

Lamar, which rallied past SLU 
48-38 on the road a week earlier, 
dipped to 3-2 overall and 1-1 in the 
conference. 

The start of the game was delayed 
for 90 minutes due to the power out- 
age and the stall continued in a first 
quarter with 120 combined yards, 71 
by the visiting Demons. 

But NSU rode Henderson's arm 
and an explosive running game into 
a commanding lead, then held off 



a second-half comeback bid by the 
Cardinals, clinching the outcome 
with a wonderfully-run 54-yard 
screen pass and run by sophomore 
tailback D.J. Palmer into a blitzing 
Lamar defense on third-and-10 with 
3:20 remaining. 

Sidney Riley had two of the De- 
mons' four first-half TDs. on runs 
of 1 and 5 yards bookending two 
Henderson scoring passes, 5 yards 
to Trevor Goodie and 19 to Phillip 
Harvey. NSU got its last two tallies 
in the final four minutes of the open- 
ing half. 

The Demons didn't get cheapies. 
Their scoring drives were 51, 61, 66 
and 76 yards. Goodie's score, on an 
inside flanker screen, put NSU up 
to stay. Harvey's touchdown was a 
backbreaker for the Cardinals, 3:49 
before halftime. 

NSU got first and goal at the 2 
on a pass interference penalty, but an 
offensive pass interference shoved 
the Demons back to second-and goal 
at the 19. 

An incompletion made it third 
down, when Henderson found Har- 
vey with his back to the goalline be- 
tween three defenders at the 10. He 
bounced off the tacklers, spinning 
and sprinting toward the end zone 
for the score. 

After a punt, the Demons needed 
only 1 :26 on seven plays to raise the 
margin to 20 points on Riley's inside 
counter from the 5. 

But Lamar got a 26-yard field goal 



on its first series after halftime to 
draw within 27-10, and the Demons 
cost themselves seven more points 
when Jamaal White was flagged 
for a personal foul that wiped out a 
weaving 89-yard interception run- 
back by Cashas Pollard which would 
have made it 34-10 midway through 
the third period. 

John Shaughnessy banged through 
a 45-yard field goal into a stiff wind 
with 5:33 left to play, but Lamar 
bounced right back on a 40-yard TD 
from Andre Bevil to J.J. Hayes 68 
seconds later to stay in range with 
4:25 showing. 

The Palmer screen pass touch- 
down down the Lamar sideline 
locked up the outcome. 

The Cardinals actually outgained 
the Demons 460-443, with Bevil 
showing great escapability in a 360- 
yard passing output. But he was in- 
tercepted three times, with Cortez 
Paige and Lamont Simmons joining 
Pollard in the pick parade by NSU. 

"In today's football, it's all about 
the points allowed, not in the yards 
you give up," said Demons' head 
coach Bradley Dale Peveto. "We 
made it tough on them and didn't 
give up a lot while we were getting 
control of the score." 

Indeed, Lamar had only 1 1 8 yards 
at halftime, by which time North- 
western had provided enough volt- 
age to sap the Cardinals' chances of 
coming back. 





Photo by Matthew Bonnette 
Kelly Jimenez scores a kill in the game against Texas State. 



Texas State ends Lady Demons' streak 

Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

After an explosive first set, 
Northwestern State would 
eventually see its three-game 
winning streak come to an end on 
Saturday after falling to Texas State 
in Prather Coliseum - 19-25, 25-16, 
25-15 and 25-18. 

Kelly Jimenez led the way for 
NSU (6-13, 3-4) by pounding a ca- 
reer-high 16 kills and also dug up 
five. 

"Kelly is playing with a lot of con- 
fidence right now and looked great 
today," said co-head coach Hugh 
Hernesman. "She built off a gTeat 
performance on Wednesday and this 
is the player we knew we were going 
to get when we recruited her." 

For the fifth straight game, Stacey 
DiFrancesco recorded a double-dou- 
ble with 11 kills and 10 digs. Emily 
Sweet posted her fourth double-dou- 
ble of the season with 3 1 assists and 
1 1 digs. She also put away a career- 
best four attacks on just five attempts 
(.800). 

"Sweet was putting our hitters in 
rhythm and on the right matchups," 
Hernesman said. "She did a really 
good job today, especially when our 
passing was strong in the first set." 
Texas State (14-6, 5-1) extended its 
winning streak to five matches and 
has now won 1 5 of its last 1 8 sets. 

"Texas State runs a fast offense 
and has a lot of big, physical hitters," 
Hernesman said. "They have a great 
coaching staff and are an established 
program that has been doing this for 
a long time." 



Defensively, Keelie Arneson re- 
corded a team-high 15 digs, while 
Jessica Guttierrez scooped up seven. 
Mackenzie Neely put up five kills 
and three blocks, and Vanessa Cole- 
man had six and two. 

The Lady Demons came out 
on fire and took the first set 25-19. 
Jimenez and DiFrancesco each reg- 
istered four kills in the set; NSU did 
not commit an error in the frame. 
The Lady Demons hit at a .441 in 
the first. 

In the set, the teams were at a 
16-16 stalemate when the Lady De- 
mons rattled off the next six points 
to go up 22-16. Nicole Hajka and 
Coleman each had a kill to spark the 
run, while Neely contributed with a 
bullet ace. NSU then finished it off, 
25-19, after a slam by Jimenez. 

After the Bobcats took the next 



two sets 25-16 and 25-15, they then 
jumped out to an 18-10 lead in the 
fourth. NSU would respond by tak- 
ing the next four points to cut the 
deficit to 18-14 after a couple spikes 
by Neely. Though it wasn't enough, 
and Texas State would be able to 
close out the set 25- 1 8 and the match 
after kills by its outside hitters. 

"At times we looked really good 
against a very talented team, but we 
know we still have a long way to go 
in order to get to the level we want to 
be at," Hernesman said. 

The Lady Demons will be back in 
action on Thursday night when they 
host Lamar at Prather Coliseum at 7 



For the rest of the press release: 
check out www.nsudeinons.eom 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
October, 2011 



Past king, 
queen bid 
farewell 



Kyla Winey 

Staff Reporter 

A s NSU welcomes new faces 
/-\ to Homecoming court, the 

"former king and Queen Yaser 
Elqutub and Amy Dodson will have 
their last homecoming as undergrad- 
uate students this Saturday. 

"I'm going to miss everything," 
senior cheerleading captain Amy 
Dodson said. "I love Northwest- 
ern so much. I look back and think, 
Oh my goodness, I have grown and 
came so far. The main thing I will 
miss more than anything is being a 
cheerleader for Northwestern." 

Elqutub will suit up for the last 
time to play for the Homecoming 
crowd this Saturday for the game 
against Southeastern University of 
Louisiana. 

"I will miss NSU the most be- 
cause of the Demon family at this 
university. NSU really does have a 
great tradition, and we are continu- 
ing to set the bar." 

Dodson said that homecoming last 
year was a fairytale. She explained 
how the week went by so fast, but 
she stilFremembers everything as if 
it just happened. 

"It was definitely an honor and 
an experience I will never forget," 
Dodson said. "It makes me smile 
just thinking about how much fun it 
was and how blessed I was to have 
such an experience." 

Elqutub said that Homecoming 
was a blast last year and a huge hon- 
or. 

"The best part of homecoming, 
besides winning the football game, 
was being around the wonderful 






Compiled by Shana Lee 
Sauce Reporter 




Football seniors share one last Homecoming hoorah 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Yaser Elqutub and Amy Dodson are honored at the 2010 Homecoming. 



people that made up the Homecom- 
ing Court. They all deserve the rec- 
ognition and are all role models for 
this university." 

It was sheer faith that Dodson 
ended up a Demon. After already 
being registered as a Mcneese State 
University Cowgirl, she realized that 
she was not ready to give up cheer- 
leading. Dodson researched differ- 
ent colleges in Louisiana that did not 
not have cheer tryouts yet and came 
upon Northwestern. 

"I haven't for a second regret- 
ted my decision. I truly believe God 
brought me to Natchitoches and to 
Northwestern State University." 

Elqutub chose Northwestern for 
both the Louisiana Scholars' College 
program and a chance to try-out for 
the football team. "There is presti- 
gious tradition and history at NSU," 
Elqutub said. 

This year makes Dodson 's 1 1th 
year of cheering and Elqutub's ninth 
year of playing football. Both share 
dreams of participating in the re- 
spective sport forever, but they also 






understand that it may not work out 
that way. 

"I tell people that Plan-A is to 
go to medical school and Plan-B 
is to try out for the NFL; so just in 
case Plan-B doesn't work out, I still 
have Plan-A. I am serious about 
both and currently applying to medi- 
cal schools in Texas. I plan on be- 
ing a general physician one day, so 
anyone who is looking for a Demon- 
doctor, come see me," Elqutub said. 

Dodson 's plans after graduating 
are not clear, but she has a passion 
for teaching elementary students. 
One thing she does know is that she 
wants to stick Natchitoches after 
graduating. 

"I realize that cheerleading is not 
something I can get a degree in, but 
I can move to the opposite end of the 
chain and coach a squad," Dodson 
said. "Northwestern is such a friend- 
ly campus. I am so sad for my time 
at Northwestern to be almost over, 
but I am more than blessed to have 
chosen the best university I could 
have possibly attended." 




Ricky Is: 




Yaser Elqutub 




Sherad Sorrells 




"/ will never forget how awesome it was when I was a freshman and we went to SFA and won 
the chief back. The past few years have been a struggle at times and also an exciting time 
What I mean by that is that when coach Peveto got here it was a tough year not winning, but 
that didn 't stop our heart and our will. We have fought back and won some big games and 
have some big games ahead that I promise you '11 see the heart of the team revealed, and it will 
be a fun thing to watch. So in summary my greatest memory is how this team, these seniors 
and our one of a kind coaches jabs fought through adversity and answered the call. " 

"My most mermorable moment has to be our first win over Tarleton State during the 2010 
season. We went 0-1 1 the previous season and winning the game felt so good. Last year 's 
homecoming was also an unforgettable moment. The game took two overtimes to decide its 
outcome, but we came on top in the end. This team has taught me how to come together and 
work as one unit. It taught me how to be a team player. 1 love this team! " 



"Greatest memory is seeing the Demon program rebuild itself and having the support of all 
the Demon fans. 1 have learned more from my teammates and my coaches than any other 
thing I have done. They have helped shape me into the person I am today and will cherish the 
moments 1 had with them! Last Homecoming game is just another on my list of games this 
year. They all mean the same to me because they are all worth the same. We plan to put on a 
good show though. " 



"One of my greatest memories is our trip to Tiger Stadium. That whole experience was amaz- 
ing. I would never forget the friends I met here. Some of them might be in my wedding one 
day. I'm excited to play in front of all of the Demon fans for Homecoming. We have a good 
turn out and Homecoming is always a fun time. The positive influence from the coaches made 
my work effort increase tremendously in football and in life. " 



"Beating SFA for Chief Caddo has the be the greatest memory I've acquired since becoming 
a Demon football player. This is my last homecoming, so I 'm bittersweet about it all. After 
college, I 'm going to see where football takes me, but I have a few plans to fall back on. My 
coaches have taught me numerous things about the game of football, but that pales in com- 
parison to all the things they taught me about the game of life. " 



Cashas Pollard 




SCRAMBLERS 

Unscramble the letters within each rectangle to form four ordinary words. Then 
rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag! 

Clear 

UCLID 



Blunt 

KNARF 

Cranky 

YORREN 

Accord 

UNIONS 



"Boy! 



Were my 

hot today!" 



TODAY'S WORD 






Photo Dy tiary Hardamon 

Paul Harris becomes a former Demon football player again after being cut from team for not adhering to 

stipulations set by coaching staff. 

Harris receives last strike: Dismissed from team for good 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Junior quarterback Paul Harris 
was dismissed from the North- 
western State football team 
Wednesday for disciplinary reasons 
after falling short of stipulations for 
his return from an earlier suspen- 
sion, said Demons head coach Brad- 
ley Dale Peveto. 

Harris, a second-team Preseason 
All-Southland Conference selection 
this year, returned last week from a 
suspension stemming from his con- 
duct during NSU's season-opening 
24-23 win over Delta State on Sept. 
1 . He missed three complete games 
and all but the first quarter of the 
Delta State game for disciplinary 
reasons related to outbursts on the 
sideline and in the team locker room 
at halftime. 

He played two snaps as the 
backup quarterback, running twice 



for four yards, last Saturday night 
against McNeese in Turpin Stadium. 

Harris started the season-opening 
home game with Delta State, but 
came out in a pre-determined rota- 
tion after his second series. 

He was benched for the remainder 
of the half for disciplinary reasons 
by Peveto. After further problems in 
the locker room at halftime, Peveto 
directed Harris to get out of uniform 
and not return to the stands. 

The following day. Peveto an- 
nounced an indefinite suspension 
of the Baton Rouge-Tara product, 
who started 14 games (four as a true 
freshman, nine last year - missing 
two starts and one complete game 
due to injury) as a Demon. 

Before being reinstated, Harris 
signed a contract listing conditions 
for him to remain on the team, and 
came back on "strike two" according 
to Peveto, meaning any further prob- 



lems would result in his removal 
from the program. 

"There was failure to meet the 
standards that we established for 
Paul to be a member of our team," 
said Peveto. "We agreed upon those 
expectations and unfortunately Paul 
fell short. The team comes first. 

"Paul's been a very important part 
of our program since he got here and 
we really hoped this would have a 
different outcome. As we turn the 
page, we thank Paul for his positive 
contributions as a Demon, and we 
wish him nothing but the best in the 
future," said Peveto. 

Harris finishes ranked 10th all- 
time in the Demons' career top 10 
in passing yardage (2,832 yards) 



For rest of story: 
visit www.nsudemons.com 




u rrent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, October 19, 2011 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 7 



Secondhand smoke exposure not eliminated on campus 



Submitted by Fresh Campus 

When the topic of involuntary- 
exposure to secondhand 
smoke comes up, many 
people assume that separating smok- 
ers from nonsmokers through des- 
ignated smoking sections, cleaning 
the air and ventilating buildings are 
good options to satisfy all involved 
parties. 

While these options are impor- 
tant to consider, we need to keep in 
mind that the U.S. Surgeon General 
reported that ventilation technology 
and air cleaning systems cannot be 
relied upon to completely control 
health risks from secondhand smoke 
exposure. Air cleaning systems re- 
move large particles, but do not re- 
move the smaller particles or gases 
found in secondhand smoke. Heat- 
ing and air conditioning systems 
also distribute secondhand smoke 
throughout a building. 

Alexandria, La recognized the is- 
sue and voted unanimously several 
weeks ago to ban smoking in all bars 
and casinos. This new ban strength- 
ens Louisiana ACT 81 5, a state-wide 
law passed in 2007 that requires all 
Louisiana workplaces and restau- 
rants to be 100 percent smoke-free. 
Thus, the era of designated smok- 
ing sections and areas is coming to 
a close. 

While these indoor smoking is- 
sues are not a problem at NSU due 
to Louisiana ACT 815, students on 



campus are still involuntarily ex- 
posed to secondhand smoke-when 
walking to and from classes and en- 
tering buildings-because there is not 
a 100 percent smoke-free campus 
policy. 

NSU does currently have a 25- 
foot policy that requires smokers 
to be 25-feet away from all campus 
buildings. However, the policy does 
not afford students the 100 percent 
protection from secondhand smoke 
on campus that they deserve. This 
policy simply attempts to separate 
smokers from nonsmokers, but does 
not get the job done as evidenced by 
the ample number of cigarette butts 
littering building entrance ways and 
perimeters. 

A prominent example of the need 
for outdoor smoking bans is New 
York City's new law that makes 
smoking illegal in the city's 1,700 
parks, Times Square and 14 miles 
of public beaches. While the ban 
in New York City has received the 
most press, it is not the first city to 
enact such a ban. 

According to the Americans for 
Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation, 
105 cities across the United States 
have banned smoking on public 
beaches, and 507 cities prohibit 
smoking in public parks. 

These bans are designed to help 
limit involuntary exposure to sec- 
ondhand smoke and reduce litter 
from discarded cigarette butts. 

The outdoor smoking bans are not 



restricted to U.S. cities. According 
to estimates by the American Lung 
Association and Americans for Non- 
smokers' Rights Foundation: 

• 586 colleges and universi- 
ties nationwide have enacted 100 
percent smoke-free campus policies 
to date. 

• 250 colleges have enacted 
100 percent tobacco-free campus 
policies to date. 

• Louisiana Delta Commu- 
nity College and Nicholls State Uni- 
versity in Louisiana are included in 
the 100 percent tobacco-free cam- 
puses. 

• LSUHSC Shreveport and 
Our Lady of the Lake College in 
Louisiana are included in the 100 
percent smoke-free campuses. 

These statistics and policy trends 
underscore the growing importance 
of outdoor smoking bans to fully 
protect nonsmokers from involun- 
tary exposure to secondhand smoke. 

As students, we must take owner- 
ship of the smoke-free campus issue 
by voicing our support for passage 
of a 100 percent smoke-free cam- 
pus policy at NSU. Passage of such 
a policy will not only position our 
school as a leader in the nationwide 
smoke-free movement, but it will 
also create a healthier campus envi- 
ronment to better protect the health 
of all NSU students. 

Show your support for passage 
of a 100 percent smoke-free campus 
policy by signing the student peti- 




Photo sumbitted by Fresh Campus 

Despite the 25-foot smoking policy, cigarette butts accumulate behind the Student Union. According to the 
Americans for Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation, 105 cities across the United States have banned smoking on 
public beaches and 507 cities prohibit smoking in public parks. 



State, parish 
elections Saturday 



Natchitoches Parish will host 
state and local elections this 
Saturday for governor, state 
representative, sheriff and five Con- 
stitutional amendments. When go- 
ing to the polls to cast your vote, you 
must bring either a driver's license, 
Louisiana Special ID or some other 
recognized picture ID with your 
name and signature. The polls will 
be open Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 
6 p.m. 

Election Candiates 
Governor 

David Blanchard 

No Party 

Leonard "Lenny" Bollingham 
No Party 

"Ron" Ceasar 
No Party 

Cary J. Deaton 
Democrat 

Tara Hollis 
Democrat 

"Bobby" Jindal 
Republican 

William Robert "Bob" Lang, Jr. 
No Party 

Scott Lewis 
Libertarian 



"Niki Bird" Papazoglakis 

Democrat 

Ivo "Trey" Roberts 
Democrat 

State Representative 

22nd Representative District 

Terry Brown 
No Party 

Billy R. Chandler 
Republican 

"Tim" Murphy 
Republican 

State Representative 

23rd Representative District 

Kenny Cox 
Democrat 

"Rick" Nowlin 
Republican 

Ralph Wilson 
Democrat 

Sheriff 

Danny C. Hall 
No Party 

Victor Jones 
Democrat 



Public Affairs Research Council Guide 
to 2011 LA Constitutional Amendments 

1. Funding TOPS and Sustaining Cigarette Tax Revenue 

A vote for would: dedicate a new funding source for TOPS by redirecting annual tobacco settlement proceeds 
from the Millennium Trust to the college scholarship fund and place a portion of the cigarette tax permanently in 
the Constitution. 

A vote against would: leave unchanged the type of the financing sources availabel for TOPS and allow a current 
four-cent per pack cigarette tax to expire. 

2. Reducing the Finanical Liability of State Retirenment Systems 

A vote for would: require the Legislature to designate certain percentages of the state 's nonrecurring revenue to 
reduce the long-term financial shortfall of the state employee (LASERS) and teacher (TRSL) retirement systems. 

A vote against would: still allow the Legislature to appropriate nonrecurring revenue to retiring the unfunded 
accrued liabifity of public retirement systems but would not require such. 

3. Protecting the Patient's Compensation Fund 

A vote for would: protect the Patient 's Compensation Fund from legislative appropriation by establishing it in 
the Constitution and defining it as a private custodial fund to be used only for the benefit and protection of medi- 
cal malpractice claimants and qualified health care providers. 

A vote against would: retain the existing statutory definition of the Patients Compensation Fund, which could 
subject the Fund to appropriation by the Legislature. 

4. Managing the Budget Stabilization "Rainy Day'' 1 Fund 

A vote for would: provide that if money is withdrawn from the Budget Stabilization Fund, the state must begin 
to replenish the Fund during the second fiscal year after the money was withdrawn, paying back the withdrawn 
amount in thirds each year until fully repaid or until the Fund reaches its statutory cap. 

A vote against would: leave the state to deal with its current statute, which prohibits money taken from the 
Budget Stabilization Fund from being replenished in the same fiscial year that is was withdrawn or the following 
fiscal year. However, this law is being challenged in court as unconstitutional and could be overturned. 

5. Updating the Census Change in a New Orleans Tax Sales Law 

A vote for would: identify the City of New Orleans by name rather than by reference to it s outdated 2000 Census 
population in a section of the Constihttion regarding auctions of tax-delinqent properties. 

A vote against would: leave the outdated Census population reference in the Constitution with the result that 
New Orleans would not maintain an existing exemption from the minimum bid requirements for property tax 
sales. 

Source: www.la-par.org 



Vet Tech Club 
to implant animal 
recovery chips 

NSU News Bureau 

Northwestern State University's 
Veterinary Technology Club 
will hold a fund raiser for pet 
owners interested in implanting an 
identification microchip in their pet. 
Microchips are placed beneath the 
animal's skin, which are registered 
with the American Kennel Club da- 
tabase. Pet owners will receive a tag 
in the mail to match their pet's collar. 

"When pets are found, the tag 
will have a telephone number and 
the animal's microchip ID number," 
explained Jessica Hudspeth, Regis- 
tered Veterinary Technician in the 
Department of Biological Sciences. 
"The phone number is called and 
your pet can be identified. If for some 
reason your pet's collar or tag is lost, 
your pet can still be identified. Stan- 
dard veterinary hospital and shelter 
protocol recommends that there be 
a microchip scanner at the facility 
and pets that are found are scanned 
for a chip. The facility scans the area 
around the shoulders and the chip 
number and company comes up in 
the scanner window. The facility can 
then call the company and you will 
be contacted so that your pet can be 
safely returned to you." 

The Vet Tech Club will offer the 
microchip, lifetime registration and 
service for S35 from 1-5 p.m. Mon- 
day, Oct. 24 in Room 102 of Bien- 
venu Hall. Pet-owners must make 
an appointment by calling Hudspeth 
at (318) 357-4316 or e-mailing hud- 
spethjfansula.edu. 

For more information on the mi- 
crochip, visit www.akccar.org. 



Index 1 


Wednesday 

70735° 


Thursday 

74737° 


Friday 

80743° 


Saturday 

83749° 


Sunday 

82749° 


Monday 

84750° 


Tuesday 

86750° 


2 Life 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 


















Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 

October 19, 2011 



Demon Celebration Marks 
Successful Homecoming 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Pictured above: NSU cheerlead- 
ers perform at downtown pep 
rally on Friday. Also shown, 
Purple Pizazz Pom Line, NSU 
football team and 2011 Honor 
Court. The pep rally was hosted 
by Student Activities Board and 
masters of ceremonies, Victoria 
Hippler. The students, alumni, 
faculty and Natchitoches citizens 
were in attendence to watch the 
event which lasted 45 minutes. 




Ying Yang Twins 
'drop it like it's hot' 



Tom H. Lawler 

Sauce reporter 

Students at Northwestern 
State were shaking like a 
saltshaker last Thursday 
when the Student Activities 
Board held a Ying Yang Twins 
concert. The event was part of the 
Homecoming Week festivities and 
was held in A.A. Fredericks. 

The SAB used advice of 
students from the previous spring 
semester and decided to throw 
larger events. 

"Last semester we were looking 
at people like Bruno Mars and 
B.O.B" said junior SAB Executive 
Representative at Large, Austin 
McCann. 

Although other bands were 
considered, the Ying Yang Twins 
were more affordable. 

"We sent offers, but most were 
shot down. We saw the Ying Yang 
Twins and we were able to get 
[them]" said McCann. 

The total cost to book the 
performers was around $1 1 ,700. 

The concert began at 8 p.m. and 
lasted for just over one hour. 



The students who attended 
held up their mp3 players and 
smart phones to capture every 
bass-pounding moment of the 
performance. In the aisles of 
A.A Fredericks, groups of 
friends danced and swayed like a 
pendulum to the rhythm. 

The performers consisted of 
the two crunk rappers Kaine and 
D-Roc accompanied by a DJ who 
provided the background beats and 
harmonies. 

"I feel it was a success, it went 
way past our expectations," said 
Ruth Fruge', junior Liberal Arts 
major at Scholars and member of 
SAB. 

The Ying Yang Twins played 
most of their own songs like 
"Wait (The Whisper Song)", "Salt 
Shaker", "What's Happ'nin!", 
"Get Low" and "Ms. New Booty" 
among many others. In addition, 
they also played music from other 
artists like Mike Jones. 

"They made the concert a lot 
of fun. They really gave it a lot of 
energy," said Fruge'. 

Look in the future for more 
incredible concerts and events 
from the Student Activities Board. 



Homecoming winners 
show schoorspirit 



Submitted photo 
Pictured to the left: Members of 
Alpha Omicron Pi celebrate win- 
ning first place in "Overall Home- 
coming" this past week. They 
won first place in the corndog 
eating contest and the cupcake 
bake off. They also placed sec- 
ond in the float competition, third 
in Lip Sync and particpated in 
Homecoming Hunnies. 



Yevette Wagoner / 
Kayla Winey 

Life Editor/Sauce Reporter 

Alpha Omicron Pi won 
first place in "Overall 
Homecoming" based on 
overall points for various activities 
and competitions. 

Last Wednesday, NSU students 
mimed, strutted and danced during 
annual Homecoming skits at A. A. 
Fredericks Auditorium. 

The Student Theater 
Organization won the Homecoming 
Hunnies skit. 

For the lip sync competition, 
Phi Mu Fraternity won the sorority 
division; Theta Chi won the 



fraternity division; Student Theater 
Organization won the general 
division. 

On Friday the annual 
Homecoming parade had 25 floats, 
which ended with a pep rally at the 
riverbank. Organizations designed 
floats that paraded through campus 
and downtown. 

The Homecoming football game 
against the Southeastern University 
Lions resulted in a 51-17 victory for 
the Demons. 

After the game, "Boogie on 
the Bricks" was brought back for 
the post-home game tradition on 
Front Street. A live band performed 
and gave alumni and students the 
chance to celebrate the win together. 



What to look 
for this week: 

The Wiz 

Musical production 

Wed. 19- Sat. 22 

A.A. Fredericks 

Auditorium 

7:30 p.m. 

Free for NSU 

and LSMSA 

students with student ID 

$ 1 5 and $ 1 2 for senior 

citizens call 

(318)357-4483 

for ticket information 

"A Pair of Nuts" 

Comedy skit 
Tuesday 25 
7 p.m. 

Student Union Ballroom 
NSU Chamber 

Choir Concert 

Tuesday 25 
Magale Recital Hall 
7:30 p.m. 
Free with NSU 
student ID 



Alumnus never 
lost love for 
Natchitoches, NSU 

NSU News Bureau 

Jim Bridges climbed to the top 
of the business world, worked 
and lived in countries around 
the globe, raised a family, died 
much too young and always took 
deep pride and satisfaction in his 
Natchitoches upbringing and his 
Northwestern education. 

Judy Bridges touched on 
those points and others about her 
late husband recently when she 
attended a Northwestern alumni 
reception, tailgate activities and 
the football game between the 
Demons and SMU in Dallas. 

Although Judy met and 
married Jim when he was working 
in Indiana and never lived in 
Natchitoches, she knew a lot about 
the community where he grew 
up and the university he attended 
from visiting here often and 
hearing her husband reminisce. 

When he was a kid in 
Natchitoches swimming and 
fishing in Cane River, riding his 
bike around town and learning to 
pick a guitar, Jim never envisioned 
a future built on such unimaginable 
things as computers and high tech 




3ges 

information systems. 

In fact, he still didn't know 
what he wanted to do with the rest 
of his life when he graduated from 
Natchitoches Central High School 
in 1976. 

So he joined the Air Force and 
spent some time in Germany and 
other places far from his little 
Louisiana hometown. 

Military service gave Jim the 
chance to spread his wings and 
kick up his heels some after an 
enjoyable but relatively reserved 
childhood as the son of a deputy 
sheriff and a department store clerk 
who knew everybody in town. 

Jim's deep respect for his 
parents Herman and Wilda and his 
knowledge that nearly everything 
that happened in town was on their 
radar kept him from straying far 
from the path of correct and proper 



To read the rest of the 
story, visit 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 




Opinions 



thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
October 19, 2011 



The 

Current Sauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 

Letter from the editor 




Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 



t has come 
to my 
attention 
that a recent 
editorial piece 
was a bit rude and insensitive. 

I want to take this time to 
apologize for that very reason. 
Everyone has opinions. Some 
seem more legit than others. Some 
of them sound completely off the 
wall. The Current Sauce encourages 
opinions that are well informed. 
The article had some flaws in that 
aspect. 

The columnist's intention was 
to provide humor in the midst of all 
the confusion of last week. It was 
not his purposeful intent to publish 



anything that goes directly against 
what the organization stands for. 

It was never to call out any one 
organization for whatever reason. 
A line was crossed, and 1 thank you 
for bringing it to The Current Sauce 
staffs attention. 

I am also a member of a Greek 
organization so I understand what 
could happen if certain individuals 
saw what was written. 

As you know. The Current Sauce 
is a student run media organization, 
so everyone on staff is still learning 
the ropes as we try to better our 
craft. 

The other editors and myself 
try to limit mistakes like this from 
happening. 

I encourage everyone to submit 
an opinion piece at some point 
throughout their undergraduate 
career. It's a wonderful thing when 
you present a well-informed opinion 
to the campus. 



by Jeff Pickering 




Gooooooooo 



DEMONS! 



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(Under New Ownership) 

OPEN 4 K 

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Rants: Cool weather: 
better quality of life 




Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



"\jryell congratulations Louisiana! 

You have made it through 
yet another scorching summer of 
temperatures well above anything 
agreeable. For too long it has been 
the case of afternoons spent inside 
safeguarded against the heat. Now 
that it is finally cooled off a wee bit. 
we can all enjoy our state's finer 
outdoor recreational pursuits. 

Indeed, once the frost begins to 
creep in like little cats" feet and our 
breath begins to suspend in front of 
us we can look forward to hunting 
seasons, football games and long 
drives with the windows down. 
With more time spent outside, it 
naturally follows that one of two 



things will occur. They are both 
related to health. 

The first thing is more physical 
exercise. Remember all of that 
sweating and clamminess after 
working in the yard or running in 
July? Forget about it! Cool breezes 
wick away the saline solution from 
your skin. 

Less perspiration encourages one 
to spend even more time outside. 
You can be outside all day tailgating 
for our football team and not even 
have to change, put on deodorant 
or wash your face before going out 
that evening (we have all done it). 

The second thing is more overall 
happiness. Now sure, I am aware 
that all seasons have something to 
appreciate, but not like the autumn. 
Who does not appreciate at least 
one of the following: Halloween, 
Thanksgiving or-the all-important 
here-"End of Hurricane Season?" 

Our nation's football teams 
in action and the changing of the 
leaves are other events that amaze 
us and attract our attention year 



GO FIGURE! b * 



Linda Thistle 



The idea of Go Figure is to arrive 
at the figures given at the bot- 
tom and right-hand columns of 
the diagram by following the 
arithmetic signs in the order 
they are given (that is, from left 
to right and top to bottom). Use 
only the numbers below the 
diagram to complete its blank 
squares and use each of the 
nine numbers only once. 



DIFFICULTY: * ★ 



* Moderate * * Difficult 
* * ★ GO FIGURE! 













5 




■ 


* 


■ 


* 






+ 










♦ 


| 








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+ 










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1 23345789 



2011 King Features Syndicate. Inc 



Weekly SUDOKU 



by Linda Thistle 







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Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way 
that each row across, each column down and 
each small 9-box square contains all of the 
numbers from one to nine. 



DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★ ★ 



* Moderate ** Challenging 
★ ★ ★ HOO BOY! 

© 201 1 King Features Synd., Inc. 





'Of 


LACOSTE 

The Hall Tree 
#1 Bienville Square 
Natchitoches. U 71457 
^ 318 352 3631 




SOUTHERN TIDE 

The Hall Tree 
600 Front St. 
SatchHoclws. LA 71457 
318 352 417 j 



after year. 

All of these things involve 
interactions with like-minded 
individuals. Halloween trick-or- 
treating with the neighbors and a 
throng of folks in purple and orange 
screaming "Go! Fight! Win!" are 
just two examples of a proper and 
decent collective. This in turn 
reinforces the best in our communal 
sentiments. 

For those of you from other 
states, enjoy these few weeks. They 
do not last much longer. Those of 
us who have been here awhile know 
it, which is why you see us soaking 
it up. 

I would like to write about more 
intelligent things. However fellow 
student, if you so happen to pick 
up this edition of the Current Sauce 
and read this article, consider it a 
reward and break from the more 
familiar academic tones. Sure, I 
could write a volume on societal 
issues, but who would address 
nature's finest? 



Go Figure! 

answers 



8 








3 


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Weekly SUDOKU — 

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ijl 



Charles Crain 

Opinions Columnist 

Race to 
the top 

Mitt Romney is the front- 
runner of the race for the 
Republican nomination for 
President of the United States. 

Oh, wait. No, it's Michele 
Bachmann. No! It's Rick Perry. Not 
anymore? Now it's Herman Cain? 
Oy vey. 

The battle for the Republican 
nomination has been a hectic one 
to say the least. The party has been 
prepping for this ever since Presi- 
dent Obama's historic win in 2008. 
We are still three months from the 
Iowa caucus and the New Hamp- 
shire primary, yet there have been no 
less than five frontrunners in the last 
six months. 

Mitt Romney has been mak- 
ing the rounds for well over a year, 
deciding that this could finally be his 
time after losing the 2008 primaries. 
He was far and away the number 
one pick in straw polls across In* 
country last year, and he continues 
to gain support. 

However, when the Tea Party 
took the Republicans to a huge \vi| 
in the House of Representatives I 
November. Romney fell out of favor 
with members of his own party. His 
universal healthcare plan looks too 
much like "Obamacare" in their 
eyes. 

Enter Michele Bachmann>-the 
unofficial leader of the Tea Party. 
Pretty with a history of conservative 
family values, she flew up the polls 
following the Tea Party and FOX 
News rallies. She has since declined 
after she, you know, started saying 
things. 

Rick Perry looked like the second 
coming of George W. Bush, and his 
track record with jobs is certainly 
sound, but his missteps have caused 
him to take a stumble. He was a no 
brainer according to FOX News, but 
the latest Florida straw polls show 
him behind both I lennan Cain and 
Mitt Romney. 

And now, we've arrived at our 
latest Republican nominee. Herman 
Cain-who complained just three 
months ago that he was not get- 
ting much attention at debates-won 
the Florida straw poll two weeks 
ago. Since then, he has been on a 
promotional blitz befitting a Presi- 
dential nominee. His "9-9-9" plan 
has caught on like wildfire, even 
though most economists say that it is 
a fallacy. How far will he go? 
I'm not even discussing Donald 
Trump and Sarah Palin, two reality 
TV stars who flirted with the "tough 
decision" to run. 

At this point in 2007, Mike Hucka- 



To read the rest of the 
story, visit 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



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The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 
... - www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
October 19, 2011 



Demons makes it two straight: 
Lions lose 51-17 in Turpin 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 



W 



th Lamont Simmons' 24- 
yard fumble return and a 
99-yard kickoff return by 
Phillip Harvey, North- 
western State scored the first time it 
touched the ball in both halves Sat- 
urday night while smashing old ri- 
val Southeastern Louisiana 51-17 in 
Southland Conference football. 

Simmons scooped up the fumble 
and scored on the game's first play. 
Harvey took the second half kickoff 
back for a touchdown, lifting NSU 
up 34-3, on the way to tying a school 
record for kickoff return yardage 
(193 yards on three attempts). 

The Demons, heading into an 
open date and celebrating homecom- 
ing in front of 10,285 at Turpin Sta- 
dium, led 17-0 less than five minutes 
into the contest and 27-3 after the 
first quarter. They won their second 
straight, improving to 4-3 overall 
and 3-1 in the conference, while the 
Lions (1-5, 0-3) fell for the fourth 
straight time. 

Northwestern cracked the 50-point 
barrier in a Southland game for the 
first time since routing Sam Hous- 
ton State 59-3 in 1998. It was the 
highest point total by the Demons 
since a 63-12 romp over Division 
II Southeast Oklahoma in 2008 and 
the most points against a Division 
I team since 2004 and a 52-6 romp 
over Texas Southern. 

"I thought the fumble return set 
the tone, and we really got on a roll 
then," said third-year NSU coach 
Bradley Dale Peveto. "With the 
Southeastern offense being so explo- 
sive, I didn't think we had the game 
secured until we got to 48 points, but 
it was great starting the second half 
with Phillip's kickoff return. 





Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Demon receiver Philip Harvey makes a move on defender on a kick 
return. Harvey tied the single game kick return record with 193 yards. 



"This was a complete team win 
for us in all three phases, offense, de- 
fense and special teams," said Peve- 
to. "We knew Southeastern is a dan- 
gerous team with a lot of playmakers 
on offense and we had a very mature 
approach to the game, which showed 
in the way we played tonight." 

Northwestern got its first career 
1 00-yard rushing game from sopho- 
more D.J. Palmer, whose 15 for 102 
yards output included an 82-yard 
touchdown just 4:25 into the contest 
for a 17-0 lead. 

Fellow true sophomore Rumeall 
Morris scored twice, on a 28-yard 
reception from Brad Henderson 1 1 



minutes into the game for a 24-3 
lead, and on an 1 1 -yard run with 
4:09 to go in the third quarter mak- 
ing it 48-10. 

Henderson also threw a 37-yard 
touchdown pass to Justin Aldredge 
while John Shaughnessy kicked field 
goals of 44, 24 and 45 yards. 

The Demons grinded 37 minutes 
off the clock while posting 223 rush- 
ing yards and adding 1 60 in the air. 
The Lions got a career-best 355 pass 
yards from Brian Young, but he was 
intercepted four times, twice by Ja- 





For the rest of this story, check 
out www.nsudemons.com 



c 4 c 



( 




Emily Sweet sets up Nicole Hajka for a kill in the match against McNeese The Lady Demons beat the Cow- 
girls in four sets. 

DiFrancesco and Hajka lead NSU past McNeese 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Stacey DiFrancesco record- 
ed her seventh consecutive 
double-double and Nicole 
Hajka turned in a career- 
performance as Northwestern State 
defeated McNeese State on Saturday 
in Prather Coliseum - 25-17, 26-24, 
23-25 and 25-20. 

DiFrancesco tallied a match-high 
16 kills for NSU (7-14, 4-5) and also 
dug up 10 attacks to lift the Lady 
Demons over McNeese State (6-16. 
1-7). 

"Stacey is a talented player who 
is very driven and wants to contin- 
ue improving," said co-head coach 
Hugh Hernesman. "She has main- 
tained a level of consistency simply 
because she wants to do whatever it 
takes to be good." 

Hajka slammed a career-best 15 
kills and hit at an impressive .407 
mark. Kelly Jimenez turned in her 
eighth double-double of the season 
with 13 kills and 10 digs. 



"Nicole played with a lot of con- 
fidence today," Hernesman said. "It 
started on Thursday when she had 
a really good match against La- 
mar, and our setter is getting her in 
situations that get her a lot of good 
looks." 

Emily Sweet guided much of the 
Lady Demon attack by dishing out a 
career-high 52 assists. She also tal- 
lied seven digs, two kills and an ace 
in the match. 

"Sweet has been putting the ball 
in perfect spots for me - right where 
I've needed it every time," DiFran- 
cesco said. 

In the middle, Mackenzie Neely 
pounded nine kills (.438) and had 
a pair of digs and assists. Vanessa 
Coleman registered five kills and 
three blocks. 

For the Cowgirls, Nicole Bowden 
finished on a team-high nine attacks, 
and Katie Kennedy led the team with 
1 5 digs. 

With the score tied 5-5 in the 
first set, NSU reeled off six in a row 
to go up 11 -5 on Sweet's serve af- 



ter a couple of kills by Neely. The 
Lady Demons then found Hajka's 
hot hand which further extended the 
lead to 20-13 after three kills. NSU 
then finished a dominant first set, 25- 
17, after a kill by Jimenez. 

Hajka led the way for NSU in the 
first with four kills (.571 ). Neely re- 
corded three kills, two digs, a block 
and an assist in the frame. The Lady 
Demons did not commit a service er- 
ror in the set, and had just four attack 
errors. 

In a closely contested second set, 
NSU found itself down 12-7 after 
some big attacks from McNeese. 
The Lady Demons slowly cut down 
the lead, and eventually tied it 23-23 
after kills by Coleman and Jimenez. 
The Cowgirls then had a set point at 
24-23, but DiFrancesco was there to 
finish a point and keep NSU alive, 
24-24. McNeese then missed on a 
couple attacks, and the Lady De- 
mons took the set, 26-24. 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.thecurrentsauce.com 




@ NSU 



Separating smokers 
from nonsmokers 

DOES NOT eliminate 
exposure to secondhand 
smoke on campus! 



Despite the 25-foot smoking policy, students are 
still involuntarily exposed to secondhand smoke 
when walking to and from classes and entering 
buildings. 

The 25-foot policy simply attempts to seperate 
smokers from nonsmokers, but does not afford 
students the 100% protection from secondhand 
smoke on campus that they deserve . 

Passage of a 100% smoke-free campus policy is 
the best way to completely eliminate students' 
involuntary exposure to secondhand smoke. 





Help create a healthier campus environment that protects the health of all students and 
adolescents on campus by signing the student petition in support of a 100% smoke-free 
campus policy posted on the Fresh Campus at NSU Facebook page. 




O orange leaf 

y AMERICA'S FROZEN YOGURT. 



V 



u r rent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, October 26, 201 1 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 8 



Rate your prof; rate your classes; rate NSU 



Taylor Graves 

News Editor 

Starting Nov 7, students will 
have the opportunity to give 
their thoughts and opinions on 
teachers and classes by taking the e- 
Student Evaluation of Course & In- 
structor on Moodle. 

The student evaluation are offered 
at the end of each fall and spring se- 
mester and give the University infor- 
mation on the teachers and classes. 

The survey results are used to 
evaluate teachers, improve teaching 
skills and overall effectiveness of the 
NSU classroom, Roni Biscoe, Direc- 
tor of University Planning, said. 

When the teachers receive results 
for their classes, they are able to see 
if their teaching style was helpful to 
students and if it should be changed 
or altered. 

"It helps me know if I'm doing 



my job,*' Biscoe said. "This shows 
me how to improve my teaching or 
my classes and is helpful in Decem- 
ber when making and shaping my 
course." 

Teachers can only see results for 
their individual classes, but depart- 
ment heads are allowed to see results 
for all of the classes in their depart- 
ment. The surveys, along with other 
relevant information, are considered 
during teacher evaluations at the end 
of the year. 

Dr. Webb and other university 
officials also have access to overall 
results to help make campus-wide 
decisions for students and faculty. 

"For example, if the surveys show 
teachers are not good with new tech- 
nology, then there can be profes- 
sional technology training for the 
faculty," Biscoe said. 

In past years, evaluation responses 
have decreased. Some areas of the 



survey only receive 20 percent or 
lower answers, which does not give 
the university a wide enough range 
to evaluate, Biscoe said. 

Maegan Morace, senior hospital- 
ity, management and tourism major, 
has seen the importance of the stu- 1 
dent evaluations throughout her col- 
lege experience. 

"Yes, I do take them." Morace 
said. "I think if the teachers really -. 
do look at the results then they can 
improve their teaching style in the 
classroom." 

Teachers are given the evaluation 
data at the end of each semester, and 
there is no way for a teacher to know 
which student gave a certain answer 
during the survey. 

A student can take the survey from 
any computer with an Internet con- * 
nection while logged onto Moodle. I 
The assessment will be available to 
all students from Nov 7 to Dec 7. 




Archived Photo 

Students in face-to-face and online classes will have the chance to rate their teachers and classes on the 
student assessment survey from Nov. 7 to Dec. 7 by logging onto their Moodle accounts. 



Students help 
with cleaning 
project 



Kay la Winey 

Freshman Scholar 

The field across from the Health 
and Human Performance build- 
ing and the Grits and Mary 
Gresham Birding Trail are cleaner 
* now thanks to NSU psychology stu- 
dents. 

Last Saturday two psychology 
classes, including the Freshman In- 
terest Group (FIG) class, assisted Dr. 
Betsy Cochran in a "green clean-up" 
project on campus. The project was 
part of a three-day cleaning effort. 

The project objective was for 
students to learn about nature, trees, 
bushes, flowers and the birds, said 
Steve Gruesbeck, Director of Ser- 
vice-Learning. Plus, students be- 
come more involved in activities 
outside of the classroom. 

"It is fun to help out and it betters 
the environment," Sandra McPher- 
son, freshman, said. "I've done a 
previous project just like this and 
enjoyed it so much, so I did it again. 
If people see me working and help- 
ing they will be motivated to do the 
same." 

Jalcn Av-s freshman, said he is 
making a difference just by being 
involved. He also liked being out- 
side and enjoyed earning "the extra 
points." 

A foundation grant from the 
Gresham family provides funds to 
maintain and beautify the Grits and 




Submitted Photo 

Students from two psychology classes assisted with a three-day clean 
up on Natchitoches and campus. Saturday they helped pick up the Grits 
and Mary Gresham Birding Trail next to Eugene P. Watson 
Memorial Library. 



Mary Gresham Birding Trail. 

"This was the third of a three-day 
bird trail clean up. Unfortunately, 
there are no more clean ups planned 
for the fall. If anyone is interested in 
the spring, please let me know," says 
Gruesbeck. 

"The bird trail is much prettier 
now," Christina Hawayek, fresh- 
man, said. "This project makes me 
want to volunteer next round." 

Scholars College does other ser- 
vice projects around campus also. 
Some future events include the an- 
nual campus and citywide cleanup 
in April. April is "Keep Louisiana 
Beautiful Month." At this time, a 



group of about seventy five volun- 
teers devote a Saturday to clean up 
Natchitoches. 

Dr. Susan Barnett, the Psychology 
Department head, and Gruesbeck 
provided project support. 

"If there are any students inter- 
ested in doing any green service 
projects, I am always open and in- 
terested. I am involved in projects on 
and off campus," Gruesbeck said. 

Because of the Scholars College, 
psychology department and volun- 
teers, the City of Natchitoches and 
NSU is a much "greener" city and 
school. 



Social acceptance 
of tobacco questioned 



Submitted by Fresh Campus 

A 20 10 report by the CDC esti- 
mates that more than 675,000 
adults in Louisiana (20.5 per- 
cent) are cigarette smokers, which 
ranks Louisiana 37th in adult smok- 
ing prevalence among all the states. 

Louisiana is ranked 26th among 
all states for smoking prevalence 
among youth aged 12-17 with a rate 
of 1 1 percent. 

Even more alarming than these 
statistics is the fact that the smoking 
prevalence among college-age stu- 
dents in 
Louisiana 
is estimat- 
ed at 26.1 
percent 
higher 
than the 
adult 
smoking 
rate in 
Louisiana 
and close 
to match- 
ing the 28.2 percent of all college 
students nationwide who use tobac- 
co products. 

The choice to smoke is inherently 
based on the notion of individual 
rights and freedoms, but the prob- 
lem becomes the dangers that ciga- 
rette usage presents to nonsmokers 
through involuntary exposure to 
secondhand smoke. 




The U.S Surgeon General has re- 
ported that there is no risk-free level 
of exposure to secondhand smoke, 
and that even brief exposure to it 
can cause cancer, heart disease and 
trigger severe asthma attacks among 
many other ailments. 

In fact, more than 50,000 adult 
non-smokers die from secondhand 
smoke related diseases each year in 
the United States with 780 deaths in 
Louisiana. 

The toll of smoking though goes 
far beyond the physical realm. Re- 
cent research indicates that adoles- 
cents' decisions to initiate tobacco 
use are significantly influenced by 
the smoking behaviors of peers, 
teachers and other adult role models. 

Smoking among college students 
is particularly problematic consid- 
ering the finding from a recent re- 
search study by Rigotti (2000) that 
concluded, "Smoking among col- 
lege students may diffuse to other 
segments of the population, espe- 
cially to children or adolescents, be- 
cause of the effect of peer modeling. 
The visibility of tobacco products on 
campus, even if used intermittently, 
sends a dangerous message about 
the social acceptability of tobacco 
use." 

Thus, the fact that NSU students, 
faculty, staff and visitors are al- 
lowed to smoke on campus sends a 
message to the community and the 
students housed in the Laboratory 



schools on campus that smoking 
is an acceptable, normal behavior 
within our community. 

Furthermore, by enabling indi- 
viduals to smoke on campus, we are 
directly contributing to the number 
of adolescents and college students 
who initiate smoking. 

While a majority of smokers ini- 
tiate smoking prior to high school 
graduation, with 14 as the median 
age of onset, recent trends indicate 
that a significant number of adult 
smokers first use tobacco products 
during their college years due to its 
social acceptability on many cam- 
puses. 

Passage of a 1 00 percent smoke- 
free campus policy is the best way to 
protect the health of all individuals 
who frequent NSU and also estab- 
lishes a non-smoking norm in our 
community that discourages adoles- 
cents and young adults from initiat- 
ing use of cigarettes. 

Show your support for passage 
of a 1 00 percent smoke-free campus 
policy at NSU by signing the peti- 
tion on the Fresh Campus at NSU 
Facebook page. 



For more information on the 
Fresh Campus organization and 
what you can do to help make 
your campus fresh, visit Fresh 
Campus at NSU on Facebook. 



Warning: Financial Aid 
scam targets students 



NSU News Bureau 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity's Office of Student Fi- 
nancial Aid and Scholarships 
warns students not to fall for a finan- 
cial aid scam that is circulating. 

According to Misti Adams, direc- 
tor of student financial aid and schol- 
arships, some students have been 
receiving letters from the Student 
Financial Resource Center stating 
they have programs that could make 
you eligible to receive financial aid. 



The center is asking S59 to process 
an application. 

"Students should never pay for 
financial aid services," said Adams. 
"If you have received this letter 
please disregard it." 

Adams reminded students and 
parents of the procedure for receiv- 
ing financial aid, which includes all 
grants, loans, work-study and any 
other type of aid a student might be 
eligible for. The only application 
that will determine eligibility for all 
programs is the Free Application for 



Federal Student Aid. 

"If you receive any correspon- 
dence or get on websites requesting 
money to process your application 
you are in the wrong place," Adams 
said. 

"We have experienced staff that 
can help you fill out the needed 
paperwork properly and help you 
get your financial aid processed as 
quickly as possible." 

Students with any questions can 
contact (318) 357-5961 or go to 
financialaid.nsula.edu. 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

91763° 



Thursday 

90760° 



Friday 

88757° 



Saturday 

89762° 



Sunday 

92765° 



Monday 

92760° 



Tuesday 

87%1° 





Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 

October 23, 2011 



NSU Theatre and Dance takes a twist on 'The Wiz 




Photo by NSU News Bureau 

Main characters pose in costume for NSU Theatre and Dance production of "The Wiz," based on the classic story "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz." 
Pictured above are Jocob T. Starks as Scarecrow, Damian Morris as Lion, R'eShad Horton as Tinman, Claire Cook as Toto and Breanna Collier as 
Dorothy. "The Wiz" was directed and choreographed by Barry Stoneking and assisted choreographed by Dustin Gaspard and Rebecca Morgan. 



Yevette Wagoner 

Life Editor 

NSU students were spellbound 
by "The Wiz" last week. Flying 
alligators, Munchkins, witches and 
more mesmerized the audience. 

The Theatre and Dance produc- 
tion, based on the classical story of 
"The Wizard of Oz," w as modern- 
ized to entertain new generations. 

Additionally, the NSU produc- 
tion changed the setting from Kan- 
sas City to Robeline, Louisiana. 

Barry Stoneking, director and 
choreographer, said such produc- 
tions provide NSU students the 
experience needed to succeed. 

"This is show business and it's 
big business," he said. 

Starring as the lead role of Doro- 
thy was Breanna Collier, freshman 
theatre major with a concentration 
in musical theatre. 

"My favorite part of starring in 
the show was getting to know the 
cast and growing as a performer," 
Collier said. 

Among the changes from the 
classic story was Dorothy's home in 
Robeline, La. 

During the "Tornado Ballet," 
rather than Kansas wheat fields, 
alligators flew through the air, and 
instead of a house landing on the 
old wicked witch, Dorothy's mobile 
home coined a whole new meaning 
of being "mobile." 

To reenact the Munchkins of the 
Munchkin City, 1 performers were 
creatively fastened to seats of old 
secretary desks attached to large 
athletic bounce balls. 

The performers wore large bouf- 
fant dresses to give the image of 
being short. 

"I wouldn't say we completely 
succeeded with the bounce balls, 
but we created a new way of doing 
things," Stoneking said. 



The laughter continued when the 
Good Witch of the North, Evillene, 
pulled an Ipad from her bag. 

Played by Laricka Rayford, a 
sophomore Musical Theatre major, 
the witch performed "magic" with 
the wondrous device that could 
spell out "Dorothy" by touching the 
letters on the screen. 

The cowardly lion was played 
by a brave NSU defensive lineman, 
Damian Morris. 

Morris, a vocal musical educa- 
tion major, said when he was first 
approached about the role, he did 
not take the offer seriously. 

"I was walking along when 
someone called after me about it. 
Thinking they were just messing 
around, I turned and kept walking," 
he said. 

His teammates cheered after 
his songs "Be a Lion" and "Lion's 
Dream," a duet with Collier as 
Dorothy. 

The Wiz in this production had 
the opposite image of the original. 

In this production, the wizard 
was from Cloutiervill, LA. 

Played by Kwame Lilly, the 
character danced on stilts while 
operating long, silver, mechanical 
hands. 

The costume also featured a 
large paper mache' head with op- 
erating lights. Lilly, from Forney, 
Texas, sang, "So You Wanted to 
Meet the Wizard." 

Lauren Waguespack, a senior 
Theatre major, starred as the good 
witch Glinda. 

She seemed to float across the 
stage by wearing shoes with skates 
while she sang " A Rested Body 
is a Rested Mind" and "Believe in 
Yourself." 

The audience showed their ap- 
preciation at the close of the perfor- 
mance with a standing ovation. 



^\ 'SpooK? Spooks' 
TilBU loaffowecn Events 



NSU Halloween Carnival 

University Place 2 Apartments 
5 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 
NSU faculty and your children 
are invited to a carnival hosted by 
Order of Omega. Games, candy, 
food and fun will be provided. 

SAB Haunted House 

Starts in the Student Union Alley 
8 p.m. 

Walk through the haunted house 
and be prepared to get scared 



Alpha Phi Alpha "Fear 
Factor" Halloween 
Costume Party 

Iberville Dining Hall 
9 p.m.- midnight 
Music, dancing and food 



Checking 




Low Fees 

REALLY, THEY'RE JUST THE BEGINNING 
OF HOW WE HELP YOU THRIVE 



L a Capi tol 



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TOGETHER WE THRIVE 
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Federally Insured by NCUA 



Stay healthy: Do's, don'ts for holiday season 



By Steven Wood 

WRAC Facility Coordinator 

Don't over eat 

Do not binge eat just because the food is 
there. This can be harmful to your body 
and cause unwanted weight gain. 

Don't have too many sweets and desserts 

They may taste good, but desserts are 
loaded with a lot of carbs and sugars. 

Don't be lazy 

Get off of the couch! 

Don't dehydrate yourself 

It is important to stay hydrated. Although 
it isn't scorching hot outside, you can still 
get dehydrated. 

Don't skip warm up or cool down 

A warm up and cool down are essential 
factors in working out. Without a warm 

up 

and cool dow n, you may injure yourself. 

Don't do the same thing over and over 

Change up your workouts so you don't 
over work one area. 



Do eat in moderation 

Know your portions. Don't overeat it at 
meals. (You know there will be leftovers.) 

Do make and exercise plan 

Set goals for the holidays and stick to them. 
Don't let the cool weather and good food 
keep you from staying healthy. 

Do reward yourself 

Remember it's the holiday season and you 
should treat yourself (in moderation). 

Do get plenty of rest 

Holidays are busy, but remember you need 
your sleep to stay healthy. 

Do walk 

You may think that you can only get a 
workout from running or going to the gym, 
but just walking around the block a few 
times this holiday season does more than 
you think. 

Do stay healthy 

Watch out for the flu during the holidays. 
Wash your hands and eat properly so your 
immune system stays strong. 



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Sauce? 

Join us in our 
meetings Mon- 
day nights at 
6 p.m. in room 
227 of Keyser 
Hall. 




Opinions 



thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
October 23, 2011 



Rants: Exporting culture 



Tom H Lawler 

Opinion Columnist 

This 
weekend 
the 
Tampa Bay 
Buccaneers 
will play 
the Chicago 
Bears in 
Wembley 
Stadium 

in London. To me, this is very 
interesting. Why did and does 
American culture end up across the 
pond and around the world? 

As most of you know, there is 
American Football and European/ 




British Football (or soccer, if you 
must). Yet. after living in jolly 
ol" England I know that there is a 
demand for both. 

In fact, I was even asked to play 
for a county (much like our states) 
team. All I had to do was pay 20 
pounds of sterling for an equipment 
deposit. 

The NFL is a franchise and 
as such, a business. Taking this 
perspective it makes financial sense 
to explore and to move into new 
markets. 

Other companies have done 
likewise, such as fast-food joints, 
technology distributors like Apple 
or Microsoft, and Coke-a-Cola all 
being the classic examples. 



This is not a one-way street, 
however. That vodka you consumed 
is from Russia or Poland, the car 
you drive is from Japan and your 
food inspired with Mexican flavor. 

As the nickname (or cliche) 
'melting pot' suggests, America is 
and has always been a collection of 
different peoples and cultures. 

Even humble Natchitoches has 
its roots in two different cultures: 
French and Spanish (whose flags 
actually fly above the cemetery on 
Second St.). 

Consider our own campus. 
There are students from Asia, Latin 
America and Europe. 

As I have also been an 
international student, I know first 



hand that these students bring a 
little piece of home w ith them to 
share w ith us. 

Now, stay with me on this. If I 
trade some WX cultural product for 
some of your YZ cultural product, 
then neither of us has a diverse 
culture because we both possess the 
same WXYZ aspects of culture. 

Culture being the collective 
property of group; both intellectual 
property and material property each 
with some historical context. 

This could then mean that we 
are all becoming part of one global 
culture under capitalism. 

This is good not only for 
business, but also for international 
relations. After all, it is easier to 



make decisions yourself, or people 
a lot similar to yourself. 

As you set out to sell part of 
your culture to the rest of he w orld, 
let's say Cajun cuisine, it loses it 
meaning. It no longer becomes 
the only way to feed your fellow 
swamp people. It also becomes an 
income. 

Dear reader, consider the NFL 
again. Will the British spectators 
be American after the game, as if it 
were the baptism of the USA? I sure 
hope not. 

It is this perspective that 
therefore gives way to my opinion. 
The game became one tiny bit less 
American, one tiny bit more global 
business. 



Dynomite: You reap what you sow 




Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 



L ven the 
-'—'most 

demanding 
college 

schedules have 
a moment of 
lull where the individual can kick 
back and enjoy watching their 
favorite shows. That's why many of 
you turned to the Internet streaming 
service of Netflix because it offered 
a wide variety of shows that we all 
can indulge in. 

I was head over heels w ith the 
service, too. Since becoming a fan 
favorite, Netflix increased their 



membership prices. Recently, I 
cancelled my membership because 
I felt the service was doing a 
disservice to the people it originally 
appealed to. 

I think this is a legitimate reason 
even though some of you might 
be calling me cheap. To back my 
actions up, I assure you I wasn't 
alone. Since the price gouge, 
800,000 people cancelled their 
membership as well. 

For those who don't know, 
the company doubled its monthly 
subscription fee to new and existing 
customers. In fact, the actual price 
for the bundled service of Internet 
streaming and DVD rentals is $16. 
That's a 60 percent increase from 
the previous price of $9.99. 

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings 
wrote a letter to investors stating 



that the primary issue for the 
increased membership cancellation 
was because of the initial shock of 
the price increase. I wonder how he 
came to that conclusion. 

Obviously that was a horrible 
business move. Who in their right 
mind would not expect people to 
get upset for having to pay more for 
the service-that at times seemed to 
have an outdated streaming library? 

The fact of the matter is that 
Netflix became so full of itself. It 
was no longer looking out for the 
best interest of the customers. 

Hastings was voted last year's 
businessperson of the year in 
Fortune Magazine. And he so soon 
forgot how he and the company rose 
to the top of the video on demand 
world. Along with RedBox's help, 
the company managed to eliminate 



Blockbuster. 

- I guess Hastings wasn't satisfied 
with the increased membership that 
forced Blockbuster stores to close. 
Or maybe he never understood one 
of economics' basics principles. 
Increasing prices will generally lead 
to a decrease in demand if there are 
substitutes. 

Even I know that much about the 
business. Hastings can expect more 
people to cancel their membership 
as we near the holiday season. 

Some of you may think $16 isn't 
much to pay each month, but when 
there are few entertaining videos 
on Netflix, and you would rather 
save money, you'll understand 
why 800,000 people (including 
myself) have stopped paying for a 
lackadaisical service. 




Weight-Loss 





1. Turmeric 

2. Cinnamon 

3. Oregano 

4. Garlic 

5. Cilantro 

6. Cayenne (re< 
Pepped 

7. Marjoram. 

8. Nutmeg 1 } 2^^^ 

9. Basil ^ " 

10. Cumin 

Source: 

roxannesweightlossplan.blogspot.com 






The 

GurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor- in - Ch ief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 




Charles 
Crain 

Staff 
Columnist 



Man bites apple 

Yesterday, the first official Steve 
Jobs biography was released 
nationwide. It is expected to be 
a big seller, as the news of his death 
is still fresh on our collective minds. 

In our society; w e tend to mourn 
for those figures that made an 
imprint on our lives: pop culture 
phenomenon's who changed the 
way we think, dance or the way we 
see our lives. 

Since his death, many have said 
that Steve Jobs changed our culture. 
That is true, but as we so often see, 
he has been painted as a saint. 

Steve Jobs would be the first 
person to tell you that he was no 
saint. He was a perfectionist, and 
as you can see by the products he 
revolutionized, he expected nothing 
but the absolute best. 

This attitude caused many ex- 
employees to leave Apple with a 
sour taste in their mouths. Jobs 
would go into fits when even a 
single line of code was misused. 
We obviously know now what 
that complex achieved, but former 
employees do not look at that point 
of view. 

Probably the most interesting 
aspect of this new biography i 
Steve Jobs himself approved it, 
and he only wanted the truth to be 
printed. He did not want to be seen 
as a perfect man, he wanted to be 
seen as himself. 

He allowed Walter Isaacson 
to print all of his misgivings so 
that his children will know the 
truth. Jobs was wise that way, 
and probably knew that his many 
accomplishments would eclipse 
his personal life. He did not want 
his children to have to suffer in his 
shadow. His decision indicates he 
wanted to tell them that it's ok to 
make mistakes because he made 
them too. 

Why is it easier for us to 
overlook shortcomings in people 
who have passed on, but not while 
they are living? I don't think anyone 
would have said that Steve Jobs 
was a perfect man six months ago, 
just like I don't think everyone was 



For the rest 
of the article, visit 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Sauce 
Vocabulary 



agrestic 

\uh-GRES-tik\ 

adjective 

Pertaining to 
fields or the 
country; rural; 
rustic. 

Origin: 
Agrestic is front 
agrestis, from 
ager, "field." 
It is related to 
agriculture. 

Courtesy of dictionary.com 




The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone, 
submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 
^^^^^^m^^ www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
October 23, 2011 



Lady Demons draw 1-1: 
post season hopes still alive 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

T"^ achel O'Steen made the most 
t^of her final regular season 
home soccer game for North- 
western State on Friday night as 
her goal in the 64th minute tied the 
game at l-l against Central Arkan- 
sas in Southland Conference action, 
but numerous failed chances in both 
overtimes left O'Steen, five other se- 
niors and the rest of the Lady Demon 
scored, with a bitter taste in their 
mouths with the tie game. 

With the tie, NSU moved to 1-5- 
1 in league play for a total of three 
points and still mathematically 
eligible to qualify for the league's 
postseason tournament which North- 
western will host Nov. 3-6. The 
Lady Demons (7-9-1 overall) got 
some help after Stephen F. Austin 
blanked Southeastern Louisiana. 

For NSU to make the tourney, it'll 
need to win its remaining two games 
- at McNeese State next Friday and 
Lamar on Sunday, and have SLU 
lose its last three games (at Sam 
Houston State and hosts Texas State 
and UTSA). 

NSU got out to a sluggish start 
against UCA as the Sugar Bears 
opened up a scoreless game with a 
goal in the 26th minute from Kris- 
tin Pollard from nearly 30 yards out 
to put her team up 1-0 as her shot 
sailed over the head of senior goal- 
keeper Christian Marks, who started 
the game in place of regular starter 
Jessica Danku. 

Head coach Jimmy Mitchell start- 
ed all six seniors in the contest. 

"This is a really special group of 
seniors," said Mitchell. "To be able 
to watch them mature not only as 
players, but as students and human 
beings is very special. 







Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Rachel O'Steen traps the ball in final home game as a Lady Demon. 
NSU tied UCA 1-1. 



O'Steen lit a fire in the Lady De- 
mons with some fancy footwork to 
blast past the UCA goalkeeper in 
the 64th minute to net her first goal 
of the season and tie the game at 
l - 1 . She took a pass from Meghan 
Hunter, her team-leading fifth as- 
sist of the season, and dribbled up 
the field to go one-on-one with the 
goalie. After a change of direction 
had the goalkeeper leaning the op- 
posite way, O'Steen lifted the ball in 
for the score. 

Senior Kayla King nearly gave 



the Lady Demons the win late in the 
game but her open netter shot sailed 
to the left of the goal. 
In the first overtime period, UCA (5- 
9-2, l-5-l) controlled the offensive 
side of the field for the first few min- 
utes before the Lady Demons took 
over and missed out on a couple of 
attempts. Then in the second period, 
NSU had a golden shot at the golden 
goal with less than a minute to play 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.thecurrentsauce.com 





MfRICA'S fROZCN YOGURT. 



929 KEYSER AVE. 

irt N|<Arki\rfoctas! 
fbllova «s oA f^eiawk! 



ORANGE LEAF FROZEN 
YOGURT - NATCHITOCHES 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Stacey DiFrancesco sets the ball for a spike from another Lady Demon player. NSU lost the match in five sets. 

Lady Demon volleyball loses 5-set nail biter 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

espite Stacey DiFrancesco's ninth 

D consecutive double-double, 
the Northwestern State vol- 
leyball team fell in an in- 
credibly tight five-set battle 
on the road on Saturday to Texas- 
Arlington in Texas Hall - 20-25, 25- 
17, 20-25, 25-19 and 15-11. 

DiFrancesco tallied a match-high 
15 kills and a career-high 29 digs 
for NSU (8-15, 4-6), but UTA (8-16, 
4-6) took control of the final two sets 
to oust the Lady Demons in five. 
Emily Sweet recorded her fifth 
double-double of the season with a 
match-high 43 assists and 12 digs. 

Vanessa Coleman came one short 
of tying her career-high with 1 4 kills, 
and also rejected three UTA attacks. 
To further the attack, Kelly Jimenez 
posted nine kills, while Nicole Hajka 
and Mackenzie Neely had eight and 
six, respectively. 

Keelie Arneson registered 1 9 digs 
for the Lady Demons on the defen- 
sive end, and also dished out three 
assists. As a team, NSU dug up a 
season-high 83 attacks. 



In the first set, NSU got off to a 
quick 4-0 start after a couple of aces 
by Hajka, but the Mavs would take 
the next five to go up, 5-4. Still trail- 
ing 7-5, the Lady Demons reeled off 
four in a row after a kill by Neely to 
take the lead, 9-7. 

Still ahead 9-8, DiFrancesco 
sparked a monster 9-0 tear with 
a couple kills to go up 18-8 with 
Sweet serving. The run was the big- 
gest so far this season for the Lady 
Demons in conference. 
With NSU up 20- 1 after a block as- 
sist by Neely/Jimenez, UTA went on 
a 6-0 run to cut the deficit to 20-16. 

Hajka tallied a kill on the next 
point to keep NSU on top, 21-16. 
The Mavs then came within just 
three points, trailing 23-20, but a 
spike by Neely and an ace by Sweet 
won the Lady Demons the set, 25- 
20. 

Coleman led the way offensively 
for the Lady Demons in the first with 
four kills, while Neely had three 
kills and a couple blocks. 

The Lady Demons fell behind 
early in the second, 5-2, but took the 
lead after a 4-0 run was highlighted 
by a block by DiFrancesco, 6-5. 
With the score tied 7-7, NSU went 



on a 3-0 run after a kill by Hajka to 
go up. 1 0-7, but UTA matched it to 
keep it tied, 10-10. 

Still even at 1 1-1 1, the Mavs went 
on a 6-0 streak to go ahead, 17-11. 
The Lady Demons cut the lead to 
22-17 after a kill by DiFrancesco, 
but just couldn't find the big run that 
it needed and would drop the set, 25- 
17. 

Coleman led the way with a team- 
high seven kills (.308) at the break, 
and DiFrancesco posted five kills 
and 1 3 digs through two frames. 
With the score tied 8-8 in the third, 
NSU took three in a row to go up 
1 1-8 after a pair of kills by DiFran- 
cesco. 

Still ahead 14-11, DiFrancesco 
tacked on a couple more to extend 
the lead up to 17-11, forcing UTA 
into a timeout. The Mavs then re- 
sponded, going on a 7-2 run to chop 
the lead to 19-18. 

Jimenez would answer with back- 
to-back kills to keep NSU up 
21-18. 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.thecurrentsauce.com 






Ml' 13 



NSU 

The visibility of tobacco 
products on campus sends a 
DANGEROUS MESSAGE 
about the acceptability of 

TOBACCO USE 

• Research indicates that adolescents' decisions to 
initiate tobacco use are significantly influenced by 
the smoking behaviors of peers, teachers, and 
college students. 

• By enabling individuals to smoke on campus, we 
are directly contributing to the number of 
adolescents and college students who start smoking 
by communicating that smoking is an acceptable, 
normal behavior within our community. 

• Passage of a 100% smoke-free campus policy is 
the best way to protect the health of all individuals 
who frequent the NSU campus while also 
establishing a non-smoking norm in our community 
that discourages adolescents and young adults from 
initiating use of cigarettes. 

Help protect the health of everyone who frequents campus - sign the 
petition in support of a 100% smoke-free campus policy posted on the 
Fresh Campus at NSU Facebook page. 





auce 

Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, November 2, 201 1 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 9 



Students get hands-on experience with simulation labs 



NSU News Bureau 



4 6TT i, Alice. I'm Brooke and 
X _L I' m going to be your la- 
bor and delivery nurse. 
How are you feeling?" asked 
Brooke Humphries before examin- 
ing a 24-year-old named Alice who 
was in labor. Within a few moments, 
Humphries and other nurses discov- 
ered that Alice's baby was breach. 
Going over her chart, they consid- 
ered several factors before deciding 
whether to make a breach delivery 
or prepare for a Caesarean section, 
all while maintaining a professional 
and caring attitude towards their pa- 
tient and preparing for the baby's 
arrival. 

Alice is actually a high fidelity 
interactive mannequin whose job is 
to simulate labor and delivery for 
Humphries, a student from Natchi- 
toches, and her classmates in their 
third semester of clinicals at North- 
western State University's College 
of Nursing and Allied Health. Alice 
and other human patient simulators 
are part of Northwestern State's 
Shreveport Nursing Center simula- 
tion labs, facilities designed to pro- 
vide realistic scenarios for student 
practice. Each student nurse attend- 
ing Alice had a role in the difficult 
breach delivery. 



Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Mollie Moody asked the team of 
students questions about Alice's and 
her baby's condition and coached 
them on how to communicate with 
each other. Anatomically correct Al- 
ice can be programmed to respond to 
questions and simulate the processes 
of labor. The students were prepar- 
ing for a test that would take place 
on the following day in which they 
would demonstrate their knowledge 
of procedure in the labor and deliv- 
ery room, as well as examining the 
newborn and recording its Apgar 
score. 

In another assessment lab, first 
semester nursing students made ab- 
dominal, lymphatic and head and 
neck and assessments under the in- 
struction of Dr. Debra Clark, assis- 
tant professor of nursing, and Cal- 
lie Roberts, lab coordinator. In this 
class, students began the semester 
learning to check vitals before mov- 
ing on to dressing wounds, inserting 
catheters, changing beds occupied 
by patients and practicing bedside 
manner with low fidelity manne- 
quins and a few realistic body parts. 

"I love the anatomy and physiol- 
ogy part of it," said student Alison 
Tison as she practiced administer- 
ing an intramuscular injection into a 
realistic gluteus maximus. "Plus the 



fact that you are helping people." 

Meanwhile, Denise Winiarski's 
first semester clinicals class prac- 
ticed the proper technique for put- 
ting on surgical gloves without con- 
taminating them. 

"We follow the rules of asepsis 
and practice living in the rules of 
sterility. By the time they are fourth 
level students, it's second nature," 
Winiarski said. 

The students in the simulation labs 
were enthusiastic about the hands-on 
nature of nursing. 

"It's fun," said Halel Golden of 
Bossier City. "But when we have 
practicum days, you're stressed." 

"If you fail practicum, you fail," 
added Chantelle Stephens of Shreve- 
port. 

"I don't think people realize what 
we do," said Winiarski, who chairs 
the Department of Nursing's simu- 
lation committee. "In addition to 
the mannequins, we have laypeople 
who volunteer to come in and work 
with students in the simulation lab. 
We work on communication, ethics, 
the things that nurses are expected to 
know about each patient and the way 
a nurse should think. 

That includes learning skills to 
relate to a patient's family. 

"A nurse may have to break bad 
news to the wife of a heart attack 






^^^^^^^ 




NSU News Bureau 



Social Work Club helping local agency 

NSU's Social Work Club is collecting baby items for the Women's Resource Center of Natchitoches 
through Nov. 14. They will set up a table at the Natchitoches Walmart on Sunday from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m. to 
collect donations. Items needed include baby wash, shampoo and conditioner, bibs, rattles, pacifiers, baby 
lotion, baby power, bottles, booties, brush/comb sets, washclothes, changing pads, receiving blankets and 
stuffed animals. For more information on how to make a donation, contact Brandy Beavers at (318) 228- 
4894. 



Student Messenger Bulletin Board 

Submit artwork to Argus 

Submit your creative work to Argus for a chance to win SI 00 and be published. Poetry, fic- 
tion, nonfiction, art and photography are all accepted. There are contests for each section. To 
submit and for more information, email argus@nsula.edu. Deadline is Dec. 9. 

Vera Bradley bingo 

Phi Mu Fraternity is raising money for the Children's Miracle Network Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. in 
Prather Coliseum. Tickets are $15. For more information, call (318) 663-8230. 




NSU News Bureau 

Third semester nursing students Brooke Humphries, Tyler Todd, Stacey Moore and Lauren Sadka work on a 
dummy machine during a simulation lab to gain experience for their future careers. 



patient. Patients die. In difficult situ- 
ations, they have to be prepared to 
have those conversations," Winiar- 
ski said. 

Practicing on the simulator man- 
nequins helps students gain valuable 
experience in hands-on care, critical 



decision-making and teamwork. In 
addition to Alice, the department's 
high fidelity mannequins include 
two male mannequins and a toddler 
mannequin in a crib with pediatric 
monitors. The mannequins breathe, 
blink their eyes, sigh, moan, talk and 



can be programmed to simulate dif- 
ferent ailments or trauma. Each has 
its own chart with nurse's notes. Stu- 



For rest of story: 
visit 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Career Exploration Area 
set up in Watson Library 



NSU News Bureau 

Northwestern State University 
students have a new place to 
find valuable information on 
the career planning process. 

A Career Exploration Area has 
been set up in the Reference Room 
on the first floor of Watson Library 
through the efforts of Rebecca 
Boone, director of the Office of 
Counseling and Career Services, 
and Reference Librarian Elizabeth 
Graves. 

"We hope these new resources 
will encourage students to use li- 
brary services more often," said 
Graves. "By coming over and using 



the Career Exploration Area, they 
can find out the many services avail- 
able for them." 

Information is 
available on: de- 
scriptions, re- 
quirements, sal- 
ary, outlook on all 
types of careers; 
tests that can help 
students under- 
stand themselves 
and identify ca- 
reers that would 
allow them to use 
the personality strengths and prac- 
tice tests for certain career fields. 
The Career Information Area can 




also help Northwestern State stu- 
dents prepare for interviews, build 
resumes, learn about searching for 
a job and find out how to make the 
transition to the world of work. 

"We want to encourage use of the 
library because there is so much here 
for the students to use," said Boone. 
"Hopefully, they will get used to 
coming here and will be encouraged 
to find out all that is available for 
them." 

Students who take online classes 
or who attend one of NSU's other 
campuses can access the Career Ex- 
ploration Area online by going to 
libguides.nsula.edu and clicking on 
career exploration. 



Student business club 
seeks charter members 



NSU News Bureau 

The Northwestern State Uni- 
versity School of Business is 
forming an organization spe- 
cifically for women in business, the 
Northwestern State Business Wom- 
en Association. Membership is open 
to all women engaged in careers in 
various business fields. 

"The purpose of this venture is 
to foster networking for women in 
business who are stakeholders in 
Northwestern, provide scholarships 
for women who are enrolled in the 
School of Business and promote 



and inv est in the Northwestern State 
School of Business," said Tony Her- 
nandez, chief development officer 
for the Northwestern State School of 
Business. 

According to Hernandez, the first 
100 members of NSBWA will be 
recognized as charter members and 
awarded a specially designed pin. 
Those interested in becoming char- 
ter members are invited to complete 
an application posted on the North- 
western State Office of Alumni and 
Development website, northwest- 
ernalumni.com. or the School of 
Business website, business.nsula. 



edu. Membership dues are SI 00 per 
year. One-half of that amount w ill be 
designated for the scholarship fund; 
the rest will go towards operating 
expenses. 

The deadline for completing the 
application and payment of dues to 
become a charter member is Nov. 
30, 2011. 

For more information, contact 
School of Business faculty Dr. Mar- 
garet Kilcoyne at kilcoynem@nsula. 
edu, Margaret Vienne at viennem@ 
nsula.edu or call (318) 357-4243. 
Forms for becoming a member are 
also online at nsula.edu/nsbwa. 



Index 


Wednesday 

91763° 


Thursday 

90760° 


Friday 

88757° 


Saturday 

89762° 


Sunday 

92765° 


Monday 

92760° 


Tuesday 

87761° 


2 Life 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 


















Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student. nsula.edu 
November 2, 2011 




'Rocky Horror PictureShow' 
grabs students' attention 



Photo by Katie Beverly 

Pictured above, members of Student Theatre Organization perform 'Rocky Horror Picture Show' last Thursday night in The Alley. The show in- 
cluded ten main characters as well as supporting roles. < 



Katie Beverly 
Sauce Reporter 

Last Thursday Northwestern 
State University's Student 
Theatre Organization held 
its annual show ing of Rocky Hor- 
ror Picture Show in the Alley of 
the Student Union. 

A S3 donation to the organiza- 
tion was requested to attend and 
traditional Rocky Horror 'goodie 
bags' were available for $2. 

The 'goodie bags' included 
props that are traditionally given 
to the audience, such as rice and a 
newspaper page, that correspond 
to parts of the Rocky Horror 
Picture Show. 

The Rocky Horror Picture 
Show is usually shown around 
Halloween in theatres because of 
the influences from Frankenstein, 
aliens, and science fiction ele- 
ments that mesh with Halloween. 

Traditional elements of theatre 
showings of Rocky Horror are 
callbacks and costumes. 

Scripts are provided to detail 
these callbacks that have been 
traditional since the Halloween 
of 1976. 

Live shows of Rocky Horror 
have encouraged the audience to 
come in costume and participat- 
ing in callbacks since it gained 
cult followers in the late 70s. 

The preshow entertainment in- 
cluded the student improvisation 
comedy troupe "Out on a Limb" 
and risque Rocky Horror related 

games. 

Victoria Olivier, a junior in 
the theatre department, played 
the role of the criminologist, the 



movie s narrator. 

"We've been practicing all 
of this week, and we had maybe 
two or three rehearsals before 
that," Olivier said. "The beauty of 
our production is that it's what's 
called a shadow 7 cast - we lip- 
sync and base our movements off 
of what's going on in the movie." 

Oliver added that the show 
benefitted from the audience's 
contribution. 

"It's really not a live show 
until someone starts yelling and 
throwing things at the screen," 
Oliver said. "Generally speaking, 
for the first-time viewers, it's 
very, very weird, but if you keep 
an open mind, it's great fun. Since 
I'm playing the criminologist this 
year, I get to sit back and watch 
most of the show, and that's super 
fun for me." 

Becca Hunt, a senior studying 
classics at the Louisiana Scholars' 
College, has been going to theatre 
performance since becoming a 
student here. 

"This year's Rocky Horror 
Picture Show was shadow cast in 
the round, so the audience sat all 
around the stage while still being 
able to see the screen," Hunt said 

Hunt explained that The Alley 
was constantly full of energy for 
the pre-show games and activi- 
ties, and that energy carried over 
into the performance. 

"This year the fifties influ- 
enced the costuming, and a lot 
of thought was put into using the 
dancers not only as cast, but also 
as props, Hunt said. 



Phi Mu's, 
Demons team 
with E Lab's 
Halloween run 



Brittnany Jeanice 

Sauce Reporter 



L ast Saturday, the women of Phi 
\1n Fraternity and members of the 
^JSU men's basketball team as- 
sisted the Elementary Lab School's 
'Spooktacular' 5K run. 

As part of their service to the 
NSU community, the basketball 
team showed runners of all ages the 
run course. 

The ladies of Phi Mu passed out 
hot chocolate and water as partici- 
pants finished the race. 

The race began at 8:30 a.m. with 
the 1 mile course and 8:45 a.m. for 
the 5 k portion. 

With more than 125 pre-regis- 
tered, volunteers were needed as 
children of all ages swarmed the 
site, ready to get racing. 

"I feel sen ice is important to the 



community because it gives back to 

the people in it," said Amy Pogue. 

sophomore hospitality management 

and tourism major. 

The Spooktacular was hosted 
by the Elementary Lab Running 
Club, which meets every Tuesday 
and Thursday, running two to three 
hours each day. 

All coaches are volunteers within 
the school, and they assist and mo- 
tivate the children to enjoy physi- 
cal activity. 

For each mile the child runs, 
he or she receives a bead. After the 
26th mile, the student receives a 
marathon charm. 

Each semester the Elementary 
Lab organizes races, with the spring 
race titled " Spring Fever." 



Checking 




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REALLY, THEY'RE JUST THE BEGINNING 
OF HOW WE HELP YOU THRIVE 



LaCagitol 

FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 
TOGETHER WE THRIVE 



Federally Insured by NCUA 





Balloons for Kasey 



Photo by Sherry Recer 



Last Wednesday, members of the Natchitoches community and NSU students came together to celebrate 
the 21st birthday of Kasey Joelle Ragan by releasing balloons symbolically up to her Heaven. The balloons 
featured the words written "You will always be in our hearts." Ragan was a sophomore psychology major 
who passed away on March 10, 2011. A memorial fund has been set up in her honor and all proceeds go 
to Louisiana Lions Camp for Crippled Children, where she worked as a summer camp counselor for two 
years. Because the camp was dear to her heart, her family has fundraising events planned for March 9-10, 
2012. You can join in on the cause by going to www.Facebook.com/KCLovesLC 




Submitted photo 



Phi Mu helps bring 'miracles' 



The women of Phi Mu Fraternity visited Francis Cabrini Hospital this past weekend, and they were able "to 
lend to those less fortunate a helping hand." The ladies brought stuffed animals and Halloween goodies to 
the children within the hospital wing and boosted the spirits of the sick children. 

Adopting Children's Miracle Network in 1986 as a national philanthropy, Phi Mu Fraternity has strived to 

raise awareness and funds for this generous cause. 

With over 170 hospitals over its watch, Children's Miracle Network raises money for those unable to afford 
the care for their children. Raising over $4.3 billion to date, the philanthropy reaches out and supports those 

in need. 





Opinions 



thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
November 2,2011 



: 



Rants: The occupation of Wall Street 



Tom H. Lawler 
Opinion Columnist 




A 



s 

many 
of you 
are aware, 
our nation's 
main street 
(Wall St) is 
being oc- 
cupied by 
an onslaught 
of assorted 
folks. This 
movement seeks to disrupt and per- 
haps dismantle the income inequal- 
ity in America. 

According to the Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor, this inequality is at 
an all time high. Also, the overall 
report from the U.S. Census states 
that the number of our fellow 
citizens living in poverty is above 



normal. 

So there is reason for the protest, 
and 1 even suggest reasons for their 
weirdness. Nevertheless, criticisms 
of these protests and occupations 
insist on several things. 

For most of the complaints, 
either wackos. weirdos, winos and 
freaks are causing public distur- 
bances in a place of business. 

In this country there are just 
two of many complaints against the 
demonstrators. 

While some of the above may 
be true, I am still in favor of these 
demonstrations for a few simple 
reasons. 

The primary of which is his- 
torical. In 1773, a bunch of people 
dressed like crazed savages, tres- 
passed on to an ocean going vessel 
at port, and 'removed' it's cargo 
from it's holds. Imagine the punish- 



ment if it were today! 

Dear reader, do you see the 
lunacy in those men's actions? Are 
they any more looney than the per- 
son wearing a Guy Fawkes mask 
with a dollar bill taped to it? 

I wonder what might happen if 
a carpenter's son from a tiny roman 
village in Palestine didn't choose 
to live in poverty, say outrageous 
things (for the time) and didn't 
stand up to the powers that were. 

This leads to the second reason. 
I understand these occupants are 
not viewed favorably on account of 
display and appearance. I further 
go on to accept that there may not 
be any clear objective other than 
chaos. 

But as one of the greatest 
American spiritualist and writers 
R.W. Emerson once wrote: "to be 
great is to be misunderstood." 



And if you have never been to a 
carnival, New Orleans, Asheville, 
San Francisco, or a concert then 
these people must seem very misun- 
derstood. Fear not, for they do one 
thing we all should. 

A third and final reason of mine 
takes a look at the way this country 
changes through time. According 
to the census, only 64 percent of us 
voted in the 2008 election (which 
was actually up only a few r per- 
cents). Considering our civil duties, 
that is appalling. 

I understand that people are 
wearing leopard spandex and 
quoting Marx and Voltaire. More 
importantly here people are express- 
ing their concerns about the state of 
our economy. They seek amends. 

Even though they are 99 
percent strong, they still hav e a 
good fight against an ominous op- 



ponent, corporate America. 

It is not uncommon for people 
to make outrageous claims in an 
attempt to modify society. 

Going back to what is above, 
we all should do attempt to modify 
society. 

Maybe we could vote more be- 
cause no one is stopping you from 
expressing an opinion. It doesn't 
even need to be a good one to be 
spoken (take mine for example). 

So to make sure I have driven 
the point home: it is too easy to 
call them hippies and mock these 
people. 

However, these zany hippies are 
doing what they argue is best for 
America. They have the freedom, 
relevance and oddities necessary to 
do so. 



R.F.D. 



bv Mike Marland 




Out on a Limb 



by Gary Kopervas 





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HERE IS A PLEASANT LITTLE GAME that will give you a 
message every day. It's a numerical puzzle designed to spell 
out your fortune. Count the letters in your first name. If the 
number of letters is 6 or more, subtract 4. If the number is less 
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Courtesy of Kings Features Weekly 



The 

CurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce. com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



Charles 




Columnist 



Take my 

'Kardashian, 

please' 

The number one topic on 
Twitter Monday was "'#Thin 
gsLongerThanKimK 's Wedd 
ing." This woman has made untold 
millions by selling her image and 
her family, but She wants privacy 
during this difficult time. 

I cannot abide by the new 
celebrity culture of people that 
become famous because they air 
their dirty laundry for the entire 
world to see. Paris Hilton started 
this trend, and she has since faded 
away. Time is ticking for the 
Kardashian sisters. 

Kim filed for divorce 
a mere 72 days after she made 
over SI 7 million to get married in 
the first place. Of course, it was 
filmed for her television show. 
She sold the wedding pictures to 
People magazine for a reported 
$2.5 million. I have to hand it to 
her, it took some balls to register at 
different outlets and let guests buy 
things for you when you knew that 
it was a sham marriage. Will Justin 
Bieber ask for the black vase back? 

There are millions ol 
people in this country who are 
fighting every day for the right to 
marry. When a gay couple wants 
the opportunity to marry and share 
their lives, they are denied over the 
pretense of "preserving the sanctity 
of marriage." I don't know what 
says sanctity of marriage more than 
getting paid for a wedding and then 
divorcing weeks later. 

I certainly don't want 
Kim Kardashian to think she is 
a spokesperson for traditional 
marriage. She doesn't speak for 
anything but herself, or what ever 
will bring her more fame and 
fortune. The blame for her exploits 
lands solely on our shoulders. 
We are the ones who watched her 
show, bought her products and 
talked about her. We gave her this 
platform. Congratulations America. 

But, where do we go from 
here? Who will be the next person 



For the rest 
of the article, visit 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 




Sauce 



Hilary 



cerulean 

| suh-ROO-lee-un 

adjective 

Resembling the 
blue of the sky 

Origin: 
Cerulean comes 
from the Latin 

word **cae» 
ruleus," which 

means dark 
blue, and "cae- 
lum," the Latin 
word Sor sky. 

Courtesy of dictionary.com 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
November 2, 2011 



Demons improve to three-game win streak with win over Bobcats 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Senior Demon tight end Justin 
Aldredge's role increased 
when key players on the 
offense started to suffer from 
injuries. 

Saturday's matchup against 
Texas State proved how broad his 
shoulders are as he migrated from 
tight end to tailback and scored a 
pivotal touchdown which secured 
the Demons' 23-10 victory over the 
Texas State Bobcats. 

It was only Aldredge's second 
carry from the tailback position. His 
first came earlier in the game, but he 
didn't see similar success because 
of missed cutback opportunity. 

After being coached on the 
sideline, Aldredge recognized his 
flaw and corrected it for a 33-yard 
touchdown run that pushed lead to 
23-10 late in the fourth quarter. 

"I'm really proud of him 
[Aldredge]," Demon football head 
coach Bradley Dale Peveto said. 
"He's a guy that you could put at 
center and he would play good. He 



stepped up with a big run on third 
and inches that went all the way for 
a touchdown, and it put us up two 
scores." 

Aldredge's performance was 
one of the few bright spots for the 
Demon offense as the unit struggled 
to match the esteem of its recent 
games. 

"Texas State was very physical 
up front." Aldredge said. They did 
some good things and made it tough 
for us the entire game." 

The other bright spots were two 
early scores that help the Demons 
take a 1 4-point lead before the end 
of the first quarter. 

On the Demons' opening drive, 
wide receiver Phillip Harvey broke 
open a 47-yard run from the wildcat 
formation that went all the way for 
a touchdown. 

Later in the period, the Demons 
drew up a scheme that forced the 
Bobcats to key in on Aldredge, 
which allow receiver Louis 
Hollier to score a 36-yard passing 
touchdown from quarterback Brad 
Henderson. 

"There are days when it's not 



pretty, when you have to gut it out 
when you're not playing your best," 
Peveto said. 

"We made enough plays on 
offense, on defense and in special 
teams to win today against a really 
good, extremely well-coached 
opponent." 

"Our guys came through w hen 
we had to," he said. "That's what 
we did best today ~ make winning 
plays." 

The Defense came up with key 
plays that stopped the Bobcats from 
scoring on four of their red zone 
trips despite being gashed for 330 
yard, 247 coming from rushing 
attempts. 

"The first fumble recovery 
helped us put points up. The last 
two kept points off the board," 
Peveto said. "We focused on 
winning turnover margin all 
offseason, especially on creating 
turnovers, and today showed how- 
important it is to winning games." 

NSU returns to action Saturday 
when the team faces University of 
Central Arkansas for a 3 p.m kickoff 
in Turpin Stadium. 




submitted photo 

Kelly Jimenez spikes the ball past three TAMUCC players. The Lady Demons lost in five games.* 

Lady Demons edged by TAMUCC in five 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Keelie Arneson, Stacey DiFran- 
cesco and Kelly Jimenez all 
tallied double-doubles, but 
the Northwestern State vol- 
leyball team just couldn't pull out the 
fifth set against Texas A&M-Corpus 
Christi on Saturday in Prather Coli- 
seum - 22-25, 25-23, 25-19, 22-25 
and 15-10. 

"We needed to be more aggressive 
in the ending moments," said co- 
head coach Hugh Hernesman. "We 
also need to start establishing a high- 
er level of consistency that's needed 
to beat good teams, and that's some- 
thing we'll continue to work on." 

Starting her first ever game at 
setter, Arneson dished out a career- 
high 41 assists and also dug up 12 to 
complete her first double-double for 
NSU (8-17, 5-8). Though, a coura- 
geous fifth set from TAMUCC (13- 
16, 5-7) was the difference. 

"Keelie has done great so far at 
setter, especially considering the 



amount of training she's had at that 
position this season," said Hernes- 
man. "As I said Thursday, she's just 
a great all-around volleyball player 
and a tremendous competitor." 

Tamara Hanna registered a career- 
high 25 digs defensively at libero, 
while Jessica Guttierrez came in off 
the bench to dig eight. 

"Tamara did great for us defen- 
sively, and she'd probably even say 
that she could have done even bet- 
ter," Hernesman said. "Our expecta- 
tions for her are high and she per- 
formed to that level today." 

DiFrancesco recorded her 14th 
double-double of the season w ith 17 
kills and 13 digs, while Jimenez put 
up her ninth double-double with 1 3 
kills and 1 1 digs. 

Vanessa Coleman and Mackenzie 
Neely also contributed offensively, 
smashing eight and six kills, respec- 
tively. 

For TAMUCC, Brooke Alverson 
was the decisive player, squashing 
17 kills and hitting at a .406 mark. 
Micah Nolan led the defense with 



1 9 digs, and Sarah Sanchez scored a 
double-double with 16 digs and 13 
kills. 

The teams started even in the first 
set at 11-11 when NSU took four out 
of five points to jump ahead, 16-12. 
After a couple kills by DiFrancesco, 
the Lady Demons extended the lead 
out to 20-14, and then 24-18 once 
Neely found her groove. The Is- 
landers took four straight to make 
it close, but Jimenez was there for a 
spike to end the set, 25-22. . 
DiFrancesco slammed a match-high 
five kills in the first, while Hanna 
dug up 7. NSU improved to 16-9 on 
the season in the opening frame of 
matches 

A heated second set started even 
(10-10) when TAMUCC spurted 
ahead 17-14 when Alverson put a 
couple down. NSU quickly came 
back to tie it, 17-17, when Coleman 
finished on an attack. 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.nsucu rrentsauce.com 





Photo by Jimmie Walker/Current Sauce 
Demon tight end Justin Aldredge breaks open a third down run for a touchdown. 




Job Options for 
Tobacco Users 
DECLINING 



• Companies across the United States are beginning to ban 
hiring of tobacco users and/or passing policies to prohibit 
tobacco use in the workplace. Prominent companies with 
hiring bans include the Cleveland Clinic, Baylor 
Healthcare System, Alaska Airlines, Turner Broadcasting, 
and Union Pacific Railroad. 

• Christus St. Frances Cabrini Hospital in Alexandria 
recently passed a policy that will prohibit employees from 
using tobacco products while on their shifts and breaks, 
and also ban them from working if the smell of smoke is 
on their clothing. 

• Other prominent nationwide companies with 
comprehensive worksite smoking/tobacco use bans 
include Coco-Cola, General Electric Company (GE), 
General Mills, Johnson & Johnson, BF Goodrich Tire 
Manufacturing, and Dow Chemical Company. 

Based on these trends, a 100% smoke-free campus policy at NSU would 
better prepare students for success in the business world. Show your 
support for passage of a 100% smoke-free campus policy at NSU by 
signing the petition at the Fresh Campus at NSU Facebook page. 




We need writers! 

Our student newspaper needs stories 
written by students. Please join our staff. 
Come by our office, 227 Kyser. Meet- 
ings every Monday at 6 p.m. We hope 
to hear from you.- Current Sauce staff 



The 



u rrent 




Northwestern State University 



/ednesday, November 9, 201 1 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 97: Issue 10 



Rad Tech students recognizes history of X rays 



NSU News Bureau 

Faculty and students in North- 
western State University's 
Radiologic Sciences program 
will commemorate national Radio- 
logic Technology Week Nov. 6-11. 
Industry professionals annually ob- 
serve the commemoration the week 
of the anniversary of the discovery 
of x-rays by German scientist Wil- 
helm Roentgen on Nov. 8, 1895. 

While operating a Crookes tube 
- an early experimental electrical 
discharge tube — in a dark room 
in Wurzburg, Germany, Roentgen 
noticed that a piece of barium plati- 
nocyanide paper began to glow af- 
ter he passed a current through the 
tube. The incident marked the be- 
ginning of radiology with develop- 
ment of x-ray technology beginning 
immediately. 

Roentgen's first radiography 
was of his wife's hand. The first x- 
ray images of patients in the United 
States were created in February 



1896 and because there was little 
knowledge of the dangers of radia- 
tion, department stores began offer- 
ing "bone portraits." Early pioneers 
irk radiology Thomas F.dison, Pierre 
Curie and Marie Curie are lauded 
for their work in the discovery of 
fluoroscopy and radioactivity and 
establishing the first school of radi- 
ography. 

Radiographs were developed 
in early days by immersing film 
in tanks of chemicals and hanging 
them to dry. This process evolved 
into an automatic processor and to- 
day, most radiology departments are 
filmiess. Labs nov\ use increasingly 
sophisticated digital equipment to 
process images for the diagnosis and 
treatment of disease. 

Radiology's use is not limited to 
medicine. X-rays provide security at 
airports and play a role in developing 
improved strains of grain, control- 
ling some kinds of insects, detecting 
flaws in industrial materials, identi- 
fying counterfeit art, irradiating food 



to extend shelf life and in the use of 
forensic medicine. 

"In recent years, radiologic 
technology has been experiencing 
a major revolution in the technol- 
ogy utilized in imaging and process- 
ing." said Dr. Laura Carwile Aaron, 
department head and graduate co- 
ordinator of Radiologic Sciences. 
"While the traditional radiology de- 
partment once depended on film as 
the medium for recording a patient's 
diagnostic images, most depart- 
ments are no longer using film as 
the storage medium for images. Di- 
agnostic images are now being cre- 
ated and stored electronically, using 
digital technology. This new tech- 
nology has created a challenge for 
educators and students to keep pace 
with the quickly changing clinical 
environment. Students must learn 



For rest of story: 
visit 

wvv vv.nsucurrentsauce.com 



* 1 , /Lt 






NSU News Bureau 

The invention of X rays have given doctors and nurses vital information about a patient to help better their 
health care. The Radiologic Sciences program is celebrating this invention during Radiologic Technology 
Week (Nov. 6 through 11) by learning more about the invention and participating in special events throughout 
the week. 




Rowing team prepares for state championships 

NSU News Bureau 

NSU's rowing team will compete in the Louisiana State Championships Saturday in New Or- 
leans. The team, coached by Jason Stelly, participated in the Frostbite Regatta last weekend in 
Wichita, Kan. The women's novice 4+ team won their race. 



Nowlin, Cox debate canceled 



SGA Notice: Nov. 7 meeting 



Submitted by Matt Morrison, 
SGA Treasuer 

The November 8th meeting of 
the Student Government Asso- 
ciation dealt with several perti- 
nent issues on campus. 

In regards to fiscal policies, the 
SGA passed the budget of The Cur- 
rent Sauce, bringing down our Me- 
dia Board budgets to be approved 
down to one: that of the Argus. 

Two bills came before the Senate 
for a vote. 

In addition, two pieces of legisla- 
tion came up for a vote before the 
Senate. The first piece of legislation. 
Bill FA 11-0 15, attempted to make 
improvements to Caldwell Drive on 
campus near married student hous- 
ing. Due to several questions about 
the bill concerning funding for the 
project and concerns over research 
of the bill, it did not pass through the 



Senate. 

Bill FA 1 1-014 attempted to push 
Mr. and Mrs. NSU elections to the 
spring and keep nominations in the 
fall. For the same concerns and rea- 
sons as the first bill, the second did 
not pass. 

Upcoming legislation to be voted 
on next week include Bill FA11- 
016, which will allow students tak- 
ing out SGA loans to finance their 
loan, and Bill FA1 1-017, which at- 
tempts to put two more 24-hour labs 
on campus. 

Another pertinent upcoming 
Resolution is RE1 1-003, which, if 
passed, would give the SGA the of- 
ficial position of opposition to Fresh 
Campus and its goals on campus. 

Other important issues brought 
before the Senate included the au- 
thorship of bills, professionalism 
during meetings and presidential 
appointments to a university com- 
mittee. 



Upcoming SGA Events 

internal Affairs Dept Meeting 

Nov. 14 



Student Union, Room 313 

Academic Dept. Meetings 

Nov. 14 
6:00 p.m. 

Student Union. Room 3 1 6 

SGA General Meeting 

Nov. 14 
7:00 p.m. 
Student Union President's Room 

Leture Series 

Nov. 15 
4:15 p.m. 
Student Union 



Ruth Wisher 
Sauce Reporter 

( |n Monday, students, faculty, 
staff and others gathered in 
die Kyser Hall TV studio to watch 
a debate between State Representa- 
tive Rick Nowlin and his challenger 
Kenny Cox for the State Representa- 
tive seat for District 23. 

The debate was cancelled due to 
Cox not showing up. Since Nowlin 
is the incumbent, some have ques- 
tioned whether or not Cox is ready 
to lead. That being an issue, many 
people looked forward to this debate 
to hear what both candidates have to 
offer to this district. 

Michael Stephenson, a junior 
computer information science ma- 
jor, was disappointed when he ar- 
rived to the debate to find that it was 
cancelled. 




"I was highly anticipating the de- 
bate so when I learned that Cox did 
not show up I was very disappoint- 
ed," Stephenson said. "As a student, 
I believe that political figures should 
reach out to us as students and edu- 
cate us on the issues that surround 
us." 

Stephenson was not only disap- 
pointed, but he believes that this in- 
cident will affect the race. 



"I have a bad taste in my mouth 
after this, and I believe his [Cox's] 
campaign will be affected," he said. 

Stephenson was not the only one 
disappointed by the cancellation of 
the debate. Matt Spence, a freshman 
scientific inquiry major, was upset 
he took time out of his night-that 
could have been used doing some- 
thing else-to come out to the debate. 

"I was eager to learn more about 
both candidates through this de- 
bate," Spence said. "I was very dis- 
appointed to hear that Cox failed to 
show up. Especially since I left an 
intense SAB volleyball game early 
to be present for the debate." 

The election will take place Nov. 
19, and both candidates are heavily 
campaigning and hoping to get the 
opportunity to represent the constit- 
uents of District 23. 



Student Messenger Bulletin Board 

e-Student evaluation of course & instructor 

From Nov. 7 to Dec. 7, students have the opporunity to participate and complete evaluations 
for all the courses in which they are enrolled in this semester on the Moodle website. All 
evaluations are confidential and faculty will not see reports until the Spring 2012 semester. 

Christmas tree decoration contest 

Using five medical items, students can decorate Christmas trees and win prizes for the top 
best decorated trees. Pick up the rules, registration form and medical supplies at Health Ser- 
vices. Entry deadline is Nov. 28. 

Financial Aid refund notice 

The Office of Student Financial Aid would like to make students aware that due to the fact 
that Friday is Veteran's Day and all banks will be closed. This requires student refunds to be 
processed Monday morning. 

Quit with a cold turkey sandwich 

Central Louisiana AHEC and Fresh Campus invite students to quit with a cold turkey sand- 
wich. On Nov. 1 7, any student who turns in a half pack of un-smoked cigarettes will receive a 
free turkey sandwich in the Student Union Lobby. 



Index 1 


Wednesday 

91°/63° 


Thursday 

90760° 


Friday 

88757° 


Saturday 

89762° 


Sunday 

92765° 


Monday 

92760° 


Tuesday 

87761° 


2 Life 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 


















Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 
November 9, 2011 



It's in the bag 

Bingo raises funds 
for children's hospitals 



Brittany Jeanice 
Guest writer 

onday, the women of Phi 
Mu Fraternity organized 
their second annual Vera 
radley Bingo, which took place 
Prather Coliseum. 

Coordinated by sophomore 
ictoria Hippler, the event raised 
wareness and funds for Chil- 
dren's Miracle Network Hospi- 
tals; the philanthropy of Phi Mu 
Fraternity. 

The organization raised 
"6,659.75 on Monday night's 
vent. Established in 1983, Chil- 
r en's Miracle Network Hospi- 
'ls raise awareness and neces- 
ry funding for children whose 
families are unable to afford un- 
xpected medical emergencies. 

Ever since its founding, 
CMNH has contributed over 
$4 billion to hospitals around 
the United States, including St. 
Jude's Hospital. Phi Mu Frater- 
nity adopted Children's Miracle 
Network Hospitals as their phi- 
lanthropy in 1986 and has been 
dedicated and determined to raise 
national attention to this cause by 
allowing chapters to host nation- 
wide events. 

These events range from base- 
ball tournaments to Vera Bradley 
Bingo. 

Sophomore secondary math- 
ematics education major, Gillian 



Brown, enjoyed the event and 
stated, "I'm so proud of my sis- 
ters for all their hard work and 
dedication into this project and 
the great success they made it." 

The women of Phi Mu enter- 
tained the community of Natchi- 
toches and NSU students with 
raffles and Vera Bradley bags 
worth up to $100. 

Ten rounds of bingo were 
played and ten Vera Bradley bags 
were given away as well as other 
door prizes. 

Julie Peeples, sophomore early 
childhood education major said, 
"Vera Bradley was a major suc- 
cess, and it warms our hearts that 
we could raise over $6,000 dol- 
lars for Children's Miracle Net- 
work. Everything ran smoothly 
and people enjoyed themselves. 
Victoria Hippler's hard work and 
precise planning paid off," Pee- 
ples said. 

"It's great to be able to see 
a group of girls working hard to- 
wards a great cause." 

All funds raised will be sent 
to St. Francis Cabrini Hospital 
in Alexandria, Louisiana. Next 
spring, the women of Phi Mu 
Fraternity will host their second 
annual Crawfish Boil as another 
fundraising event for CMNH. 





Above, Phi MUs, Taylor Layman, 
Harlie Dominique and Kathleen 
Sylvester support Children's 
Miracle Network Hospitals at 
Vera Bradley Bingo. Ten Vera 
Bradley bags were given away 
Monday night. 

Far left, NSU students and peo- 
ple of the Natchitoches com- 
munity played ten rounds of 
bingo to win one of the ten Vera 
Bradley bags. All proceeds went 
to support children's medical 
treatment. 

Left, Michael Stepenson shows 
his excitement of winning one 
of the ten rounds of bingo and a 
Vera Bradley bag. 

Photos by: Yevette Wagoner 










Upcoming Events 

Monday: 



Wednesday- Saturday: 
Importance of Being Earnest 
Theatre West 

7:30 p.m. 
Thursday: 

Helping Hands Fall Fest 
Student Union Ballroom 

5:00 p.m. 



AKA yard show extravaganza 
Student Union Ballroom 

3:00 p.m. 
Tuesday: 

Brainy Acts Poetry Society 
War Poetry Slam 
Student Union Lobby 

7:30 p.m. 



Photo by Joshua Mitchell 
Alpha Phi Alpha, Theta Chi chapter presents 1906 and Park in Student Union Ballroom Thursday. 

NSU Alphas bring popular show to campus 



Kyla Winey 
Sauce reporter 

In honor of Alpha Week, 
the Theta Chi chapter of 
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity 
Incorporated presented 1 906 and 
Park, a parody of the original 
BET show, 106 and Park. 

As in the original show, the 
top 10 music videos were played 
to show the campus's favorite 
videos of the season. Students 
got the chance to interact with 
the host Kevin Blake, as a live 
audience and dancing were 
encouraged. 

Door prizes were given away, 
and a prize was also given for 
the most live (most excited) 
audience member. To go along 
with other aspects of the show, 
a freestyle battle and R&B 
competition was also held to 
showcase talent at NSU. 

"It was an idea that was 
brought up a couple of years 
ago. but we didn't have the 
manpower to put it on," says 
President Derrick Houston. "I 
believe that it was a successful 



event, and we made the best of 
it." 

"It took a lot of thought and 
planning. When dealing with 
media there is always a chance 
of hav ing technical difficulties, 
but we didn't have any of that. 
I think it was a very successful 
and creative idea, and people 
on campus enjoyed the event," 
Houston added. 

Special guests included 
the celebrity look-alikes of 
"Beyonce". "Drake" and "Kevin 
Hart." 

A Twitter trending topic 
was also introduced called 
"#YouHitIf." By tagging this 
trend, audience members were 
able to comment on the topic, 
and their participation increased 
the enthusiasm of the show. 

"The show was really good. 
The enthusiasm in the crowd 
wasn't that great, but it still 
ended up being fun," freshman 
Kim Gallow said. "I really 
enjoyed the host's rap. I think it 



surprised everyone." 

"I definitely had fun. I 
thought it was a good event for 
the campus because it wasn't 
done yet. Blake explained that 
he enjoyed seeing a full room as 
he stood in front of the audience 
and played the role of Terrence 
J from the original show. "The 
attendance showed that the 
campus was very interested in 
being there. It was a successful 
event for the most part, and if 
we do it in the future, we will 
focus on getting more crowd 
participation," Kevin Blake, host 
and Alpha Phi Alpha member 
said. 

The night ended with a 
flashback video of Michael 
Jackson's "Rock With You", a 
soul train line and a v ideo of the 
current members of Alpha Phi 
Alpha. 

"The show was a huge 
success, and we thank everyone 
that came out to support us," 
Houston said. 



Checking 




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Federally Insured by NCUA 




Opinions 



thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
November 9, 2011 



Fresh Campus faces opposition 



Justin Dollar 

Guest Columnist 



A 



s I pick up each new issue of 
The Current Sauce, I have 
become less surprised of 
what I will find within its 
pages. 

Granted I have only been a 
student of Northwestern State 
University since March of 2010, 
I have had the opportunity to 
come across quite a few issues. 
As of late, I have seen nothing 
but "submitted by Fresh Campus" 
articles and advertisements paid 
for by Fresh Campus. 

Are those advertisements being 
paid for by the grant that Fresh 
Campus receives? As long as it is 
not coming out of my student fees, 
I have no problem with what Fresh 
Campus wants to advertise. Fresh 
Campus, like any Recognized 
Student Organization, is free to 
do and say whatever they want 
as long as it falls within the rules 
and regulations set forth by the 
university. 

They also have freedom of 
speech as outlined by the First 
Amendment of the Constitution 
of the United States of America. 
But quite frankly, I am getting 
tired of reading week after week 
about Fresh Campus and how they 



want to make Northwestern State 
University a 100 percent smoke- 
free university. 

As some of you may or may 
not know. I have been very public 
about my disagreement with Fresh 
Campus and what they want to 
do. I co-host SGA Comer on 
91.7 KNWD on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 4:00-5:00 p.m. 
(shameless plug), and I have made 
it very clear about my stance on 
their (Fresh Campus') relentless 
attempts to ram a 100 percent 
smoke-free environment down the 
throats of students, faculty and 
staff. I must make it known that 
my opinions are not the opinions 
of the SGA in its entirety. 

The power of radio is 
astounding. Just a few weeks ago 
I said on the air "if Fresh Campus 
solely attacks the smokers, 
it will be the last thing they 
do." Apparently, someone was 
listening. I am a follower of Fresh 
Campus on Facebook. I am not a 
member, but I Facebook stalk them 
nevertheless. 

There is a "petition" asking 
people to support a 1 00 percent 
smoke-free campus, and as of 
November 6, 201 1, there have 
been 14 signatures. Future doesn't 
look too bright, does it? Let's 
get back to my point of solely 



attacking smokers. 

Until I made it apparent on 
air that discriminating against 
smokers would be a huge mistake, 
Fresh Campus w as a "student- 
led initiative to make NSU a 100 
percent smoke-free campus." As 
of November 1 . 201 1 . they have 
since changed their stance and 
want to make NSU a 1 00 percent 
tobacco-free campus. 

Which is it Fresh Campus? Is 
it smoke free or tobacco free? As 
a RSO, I assume that they had to 
submit a Constitution and a set of 
bylaws that they abide by. I also 
assume that somewhere Fresh 
Campus has a mission statement. 
What is that mission statement? 
Regardless of their mission 
statement, bylaws or constitution, 
I would like to take this time to 
give the students, faculty, staff, 
and members of Fresh Campus 
something to chew on and I'm not 
talking about tobacco. 

The current policy that requires 
smokers to be 25 feet away from 
building entrances is reasonable, 
rational, narrow ly written, and if 
enforced would solve the issue of 
secondhand smoke exposure. 

The University of Stanford 
released a study stating "our data 
also shows that if you move about 
six feet away from an outdoor 



smoker, your exposure levels are 
much lower." 1 I wonder w hat the 
exposure levels at 25 feet away 
or further are. If I had to make an 
educated guess, I would probably 
hypothesize that they were even 
lower than the exposure levels at 
six feet. 

The new policy that is being 
introduced by Fresh Campus is 
unreasonable, irrational, overbroad 
and punitive. Punitive you 
ask? Yes, punitive. It punishes 
smokers for committing an act 
that is completely legal. It is also 
discriminatory. Well, it would be 
discriminatory under their original 
intentions of a 1 00 percent smoke- 
free campus versus a 100 percent 
tobacco-free campus. 

Tobacco users that choose to 
partake in smokeless tobacco 
will continue to get enjoy their 
tobacco products, not only 
in the classroom, but outside 
as well. That, I say to you, is 
discrimination. Another issue with 
Fresh Campus and their ideas of 
making NSU 1 00 percent smoke 
free and tobacco free is that they 
don't know what they want to 
do, but since they don't smoke 
or dip, nobody else should, is the 
enforceability of the entire idea. 
The campus police don't enforce 
the 25-foot rule. 



Why in the world would they 
be so inclined to enforce a 100 
percent smoke and tobacco-free 
policy? Do you really think they 
are going to take time away from 
watching a movie on their laptops 
under the shady tree or walk 
the parking lots looking for that 
illegally parked automobile to 
actually enforce the no tobacco 
policy? PUH-LEASE. What 
are they going to do? Provide a 
receptacle for Billy Bob to spit 
his dip out? Then ticket him? For 
what? 

A federal judge has already 
deemed it unconstitutional to 
criminally penalize someone for 
smoking. A civil penalty can be 
imposed, but since when have 
the police been in the business of 
settling civil disparities? In my 
time as a Reserve Police Officer 
for the City of Natchitoches, we 
never once handled a civil matter. 
The police have no business in 
issuing "citations" for something 
that is completely legal. 

I could go on and on about 
all the things that are wrong with 
what Fresh Campus is trying to do. 
However, 



For the rest of this story, che 
out www.thecurrentsauce.com 



Bil to outlaw birth 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Co-Editor 



I 



t has been 
going 
around 
on the 
internet that 
Mississippi is trying to pass a 
law that will outlaw abortion and, 
subsequently, methods of birth 
control such as "the Pill." 

The reason for this is because 
birth control makes the uterus 
inhospitable for a fertilized egg, 
thus killing it. 

This is one of the many attempts 
that have been taken against the 
rights of the people of America. 
I completely understand that 
Americans have the right to voice 
their own opinions - it is one of 
the things I love most about this 
country - but there is a time when 
you can go too far. 



There is a difference between 
voicing your opinion and forcing 
your opinion down the throats of 
others who do not share your ideas. 

The fact that this law is gaining 
enough clout that it was covered by 
Yahoo! News frightens me for the 
future of this country. 

Not only is this law being 
considered in Mississippi, it's also 
being considered in Florida and 
probably some other states. I'm 
hoping that this is just a cruel joke 
and that people don't honestly 
believe they have any kind of 
control over my body. 

This is blatant povver-mongering 
and it makes a mockery of what our 
founding fathers believed in. If I 
have the right to protest and to bear 
arms, why should the right to make 
important decisions about my body 
be taken away? The fact that this is 
even an issue appalls me. 

Women have been fighting for 
the rights to their own bodies for 
too long now and have only just 
won, yet it seems as though some 



governing officials have decided 
that those years of protesting and 
fighting were worth naught. 
My attitude on abortion does not 
(and will NEVER) give me the 
right to tell another women what 
to do with her body. I may have 
some very strong opinions, and 
I obviously express them, but 
pushing your ideas onto those who 
do not want to accept them could be 
the start of something disastrous. 

Since the use of birth control 
among women has increased so 
that now the majority of women 
use some form of birth control, I'm 
hoping that this plan never has a 
chance to come into practice. But, 
as this article proves, sometimes the 
things you think aren't possible will 
sideline you anyway. 

I can only hope that the women 
across the United States who revel 
in the freedom and safety (because 
birth control is used for more than 
just contraception) of birth control 
will stand up and fight for the rights 
their predecessors w on. 




\ TOP DVD 
/ RENTALS 
AND SALES 



Top 10 Video Rentals 

1. Limitless (PG-13) 

Bradley Cooper 

2. The Lincoln Lawyer (R) 

Matthew McConaughey 

3. Rango (PG) 

animated 

4. Insidious (PG-13) 

Patrick Wilson 

5. Arthur (PG-13) 

Russell Brand 

6. Season of the Witch (PG-13) 

Nicolas Cage 

7. Unknown (PG-13) 

Liam Neeson 

8. Sucker Punch (PG-13) 

Emily Browning 

9. Take Me Home Tonight (R) 

Topher Grace 

10. Beastly (PG-13) 

Vanessa Hudgens 



Top 10 Pop Singles 

This Week Last Week 

1. LMFAO feat. Lauren Bennett 
& GoonRock No. 1 

"Party Rock Anthem" 

(Party Rock/will. i.am/Cherrytree) 

2. Katy Perry No. 3 

"Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.)" 
(Capitol) 

3. Pitbull feat. Ne-Yo, 
AfroJack & Nayer No. 2 

"Give Me Everything" 
(Mr. 305/Polo Grounds/J) 

4. Nicki Minaj No. 5 

"Super Bass" 

(Young Money/Cash Money) 

5. Adele No. 4 

"Rolling In the Deep" (XL) 

6. Lil Wayne No. 6 

"How to Love" (Cash Money) 

7. Hot Chelle Rae No. 9 

"Tonight Tonight" (Jive) 

8. Lady Gaga No. 7 

"The Edge of Glory" 
(Streamline/KonLive) 

9. OneRepublic No. 8 

"Good Life" (Mosley) 

10. Bad Meets Evil 

feat. Bruno Mars No. 17 

"Lighters" (Shady) 




The 

CurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor- in - Ch ief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 




of KNWD 



SSS0.1 





Shockingly 
noticeable or 
evident. 

Origin: 
Late Middle 
English. 
Present partici- 
ple of flagrere: 
to burn.' 



Courtesy of dictlonary.com 



■■■ 1 



Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



Rants: Why I get 
to do what I do 

Censorship is the restraint 
of public communication 
that is considered damaging 
or inconvenient to a general 
population. Usually, it is the powers 
that suppress such information. 

However, there is a measure 
set in place to ensure that any 
knucklehead like me can think, say 
or write whatsoever they please. 

It is our sacred and glorious 
ally: The First Amendment of the 
Constitution of the United States of 
America. 

Some restrictions, such as 
defamation or obscenity do apply to 
public communications. 

Which means for the most part, 
I can do just about whatever I want 
within the 400 minimum words I 
have for this article. I could write 
nonsense or common sense. It is up 
I tome. 

I can use my free speech (which 
is unalienable) to express opinions 
like 9/1 1 was an inside job or I 
can say that 9/1 1 was the greatest 
moment in US patriotism. 

I can even write about 
grievances with faculty, students 
and all of the recognized student 
organizations. 

If an administration were to try and 
restrict my article because it hurt 
their (or whoever they represent) 
feelings, they would be highly 
unsuccessful. A higher power says 
otherwise. 

If it were the case that a 
recognized student organization was 
trying to make child pornography, 
then the many groups would have a 
case for censorship. I'll admit that 
censorship is not always a bad idea 
in certain circumstances. 

However, our problem on this 
campus, in this town, in this state 
and in this country is that our 
feelings get bruised way to easily. 
We think ourselves special, and 
therefore it follows that what we 
think is special. 

Newsflash: you and I are not 
special, and what you think and 
what I write is also not unique. 

Someone just like you surely 
exists (or has existed), and I am 
already aware of people who think 
like me. 

Having accepted this, it would 
make no sense to censor news and 
opinions that have already been 
written down by others elsewhere. 

Also, censorship cannot prohibit 
me from still thinking my thoughts. 
This why the use of free speech is 
unalienable. 

If I am allowed to have my 
thoughts, I ought to have them 
spoken by mouth or written on 
paper. 

My informed, uninformed, 
crazy, clear, uncommon or 
popular sentiments are one of my 
entitlements as a free person. I will 
remind you, dear reader, that you 
are also entitled to express opinions 




Be sure to visit 
renovated website 

www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jimmie_wlkr@yahoo.com 
November 9, 2011 



UCA sticks fork in Demon championship chase 



Courtesy of Sports Info 

Missed tackles, misfires 
and missed opportunities, 
especially before halftime, 
combined with encountering an 
outstanding performance from 
visiting Central Arkansas to doom 
Northwestern State's chances to 
play for the Southland Conference 
football title in the final two weeks 
of the season. 

Saturday's 45-20 loss in Turpin 
Stadium had a lot of contributing 
factors as UCA scored the game's 
last 31 points after the Demons held 
a 20-14 halftime lead and had been 
more dominant than that margin 
reflected, outgaining the Bears 232- 
130. 

"We didn't win the rushing 
battle (123-87), we didn't win the 
turnover battle (4-0 to UCA), and 
they outplayed us and outcoached 
us in the second half in every phase 
of the game. We had a bad third 
quarter and didn't recover," said 
third-year Northwestern coach 
Bradley Dale Peveto. "We played 
real well in the first half, but we 
left some points off the board that 
we should have had with the ball 
inside the 10 (settling for John 
Shaughnessy field goals of 29 and 
28 yards)," he said. "We did not 
get off the field on third down all 
afternoon (the Bears were 8 of their 
first 1 2 on third down conversions, 
finishing 9 of 1 7) and that was a key 
factor." 

So was the quality of the 
opponent, said Peveto. Central 
Arkansas (7-3 overall, 6-1 in the 
Southland) will certainly rise in 
the Sports Network Top 25 from 
their No. 25 spot after wrapping up 
league play at NSU (5-4, 3-2) and 
ending the Demons' three-game win 
streak. 

"You have to give UCA credit 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Demon running back Rumeall Morris escapes two UCA defenders. The Demons lost 45-20 



for executing, taking care of the 
ball, and they were the best team on 
Saturday," he said. 
Defensive coordinator Brad Laird, 
whose unit entered the game second 
in the conference with a 35 percent 
success rate on third down, saw 
UCA score four touchdowns against 
a defense that had allowed only 
seven in the last five games. 

"We've got to get off the field 
on third down. You look at their 
scoring drives and they had great 
success on third down. We talked 
about that as a key to success 
and they did a better job on third 
down. "We missed too many 
tackles, close to 20, and we haven't 



been doing that. Missed tackles, 
yards after contact, were big factors 
in their third-down success, and a 
couple of touchdown plays. A good 
quarterback like (UCA's) Nathan 
Dick is going to complete some 
balls, but we missed way too many 
tackles, and looking back, that was 
the tell-tale in the game." 

NSU was not without standout 
performances defensively, holding 
UCA to 340 total yards as All- 
America linebacker Derek Rose 
had 13 tackles and defensive tackle 
Quinn Anthony made eight stops. 

"As we won the last three 
games, we were making tackles and 
creating turnovers and we did not 



do enough of that Saturday," said 
Laird. 

NSU's offensive coordinator, 
Todd Cooley, bemoaned having 
to settle for a field goal after a 
first-and-goal at the 3 just before 
halftime. 

"It was definitely a tale of two 
halves. We executed pretty well in 
the first half, whose unit scored on 
all four of its possessions in the first 
two quarters. "We didn't cash in 
right before the half, and not getting 
into the end zone, that was a big 
turning point," he said. 

It was bigger than anyone could 
have imagined. UCA stuffed the 
Demons in the first four possessions 



after halftime, allowing a net of 
only five yards on 1 5 plays. 

"UCA did a good job of 
making plays when we didn't. Our 
protection suffered, and we got 
behind the eight ball. We missed 
some opportunities to make plays," 
said Cooley. 

On the heels of another 
miserable third-quarter showing a 
week earlier in a 23-10 win at Texas 
State, Cooley and his offensive staff 
will see if there are any common 
factors producing a third-quarter 
swoon. 

"We'll discuss it this week, but 
I think it's more a mentality of 
playing each play like it's the last 
play. The second time we got the 
ball in the third quarter, we got 
across midfield but we stalled with 
a sack. We had uncharacteristic 
mistakes, and let's not fail to give 
UCA's defense a ton of credit for 
what happened," said Cooley. 

While the outcome combined 
with another win by Sam Houston 
State (9-0, 6-0) to deny the Demons 
any chance at the Southland 
Conference title this season, 
Peveto said his team will have a 
hungry approach moving forward, 
beginning Saturday at 3 at Sam 
Houston. 

"We have a lot to play for in the 
last two games, but we always focus 
on the next game. We're playing 
one of the very few unbeaten teams 
in the country at their place, what 
an opportunity to make a statement 
about who we are," he said. 

"We can still win seven games 
this season which would be a great 
year and the right way to send 
out our seniors. We have a big 
challenge, we'll have to be much 
better for four quarters, but we 
have that opportunity next Saturday 
afternoon. 



Lady Demons slips to McNeese in four 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Stacey DiFrancesco posted 
her 16 ,h double-double of the 
season, but the Northwestern 
State volleyball team was knocked 
off by McNeese State on Saturday 
in Memorial Gym - 25-1 7, 25-23, 
23-25 and 25-23. 

After starting slow, NSU (8-19, 
4-10) came alive to overcome a 
third set deficit, but just couldn't 
pull out a tight fourth set in an 
attempt to complete a big comeback 
against McNeese (10-18, 5-9). 

DiFrancesco registered 1 8 
kills (.234), including nine in the 
third set, and 1 3 digs to get her 
11* double-double in the last 12 
matches. She also recorded five 
blocks and assists, both career- 



highs. 

Emily Sweet scored her sixth 
double-double of the season with 45 
assists and 10 digs. She also snuck 
in five kills on just seven attacks. 
Vanessa Coleman turned in her fifth 
double-digit performance of the 
season with 10 kills, and blocked a 
career-high eight attacks. Kelly 

Jimenez finished with 13 kills 
and eight digs, while Mackenzie 
Neely smashed seven kills and a 
pair of blocks. The Lady Demons 
out-blocked the Cowgirls, 12-7. 

For McNeese, Nicole Bowden 
made the biggest impact on the 
match with 21 kills (.444) and six 
blocks. Becky Bekelja tallied a 
double-double with 53 assists and 
1 1 digs, and Katie Kennedy dug up 
25. 

The Lady Demons started 



ahead 1 0-8 in the first set after a 
couple blocks by Coleman, but the 
Cowgirls went on an 8-2 run to leap 
ahead, 16-12. McNeese State never 
lifted its foot off the pedal after this, 
and took the set 25-1 7. 

At 10-10 second set. the Lady 
Demons reeled off three in a row 
after some strong attacks from 
Jimenez to go up 13-10. Though, 
the Cowgirls came back to tie it, 15- 
15, and took the lead 19-17 forcing 
a NSU timeout. 

Still down 22-17, the Lady 
Demons showed life after an ace by- 
Nicole Hajka helped cut the deficit 
to 22-20. Then, after a DiFrancesco 
kill, the Cowgirl lead was just 24- 
23, but McNeese was able to finish 
on an attack on the next point to win 
the set, 25-23. 

NSU started on top, 7-5, in the 



third after a kill by DiFrancesco, but 
the Cowgirls took the next four to x 
go ahead 9-7. 

Still trailing 15-1 1, Jimenez 
sparked a 6-0 run take the lead, 
17-15, after a couple kills with 
DiFrancesco serving. McNeese 
State responded, taking the next two 
to tie it (17-17) and then grabbed 
the lead at 21-20. 

NSU stayed tough to tie it at 
23-23. DiFrancesco then had a 
huge solo block to earn set point 
on Sweet's serve, and then The 
Woodlands native finished it, 25-23. 

DiFrancesco had nine monster 
kills to propel the Lady Demons 
in the third and hit at a killer .400 
mark. 

NSU started down 13-10 in the 
fourth, and McNeese stayed solid 



to keep its lead at 18-15. The Lady 
Demons then punched back, taking 
three straight after a Hajka ace to 
break even at 18-1 8. The teams 
then went point-for-point, with 
NSU calling timeout down 23-22. 
After a block by McNeese, the Lady 
Demons used another timeout down 
24-22, but the Cowgirls were able 
to end it, 25-23. 

NSU still has hope to make the 
Southland Conference tournament, 
but it would have to win its last 
two, have Texas A&M-Corpus 
Christi lose its final three, and have 
McNeese State lose at least once. 

The Lady Demons will finish 
the regular season at home, hosting 
Southeastern Louisiana on Thursday 
at 7 and Nicholls State on Saturday 
at 2. 



The Great American Smoke Out 2011 



Thursday 

November 17th 
11am-1pm 

Turn in a 1/2 pack 
of unsmoked cigarettes 

and recieved a 
FREE Turkey Sandwich. 



Student Union Lobby 

For more information, please visit wvvw.elahee.org/GASO.htm 




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Jimmie 
Walker 

Editor-in- 
Chief 



Dynomite: 
Will the NBA 
please stand up 

I am almost certain that I will 
ruffle a few feathers with my 
thoughts for this column. 
Before I proceed to that, I want 
to cover a few things. 

First, I want to congratulate all 
the 49er fans, including myself, 
for sticking around through the 
rough times. We are on the brink of 
returning to greatness, and I want to 
thank all of you for hanging in there 
with me. 

Congratulations to the Saints 
and their fans on Sunday's victory 
as well. 

1 also want to send 
congratulations to the Cowboys and 
their fans on beating the Seahawks 
by the score of 23-13. Their win 
helps the 49ers increase their lead 
over all subsequent NFC West 
teams. 

Last but not least, I want to 
make all of you aware that we lost 
a legend. "Smoking" Joe Frazier 
died Monday. When 1 got news 
of his death, I was waiting for the 
midnight release of Call of Duty: 
Modern Warfare 3. From that point 
on, the only things that was on 
my mind were on my mind were 
the many entertaining rights that I 
watched on ESPN Classic. 

Now, back to the aforementioned 
warning of making a few folks mad. 
As football moves into the second 
half of the season, we are still 
without basketball, and I am not 
upset about this at all. Who cares 
whether not an actual NBA season 
will happen? I certainly don't. Even 
though I am a fan of professional 
basketball, I have not shed a tear- 
unlike many of you-about the fact 
that members of the NBA can't get 
their act together. 

More games are getting canceled 
because the two sides continue to 
be hungry behind money. Currently, 
all games up to Nov. 30 have been 
canceled. 

NBA players and team owners 
have until 5 p.m. to accept the 
latest proposal. Well, it looks like 
this won't happen because the 
president of the National Basketball 
Players Association Derek Fisher 
announced that the offer is one that 
the players can't accept. I honestly 
don't know what the problem is. 
Both sides are looking out for its 
best interest and that's natural. 
But the confusion comes when 
you question how much love these 
individuals have for the game. 

I don't think NBA players love 
the game like they should. The NFL 
players and owners knew that a year 
without football is not acceptable. 

They love their respective sport, 
and they worked hard to ensure that 
a season would go on as planned. 
NBA Commissioner David Stern 
has already proven that he isn't 
afraid to cancel games, and Fisher 
has also proven that he is willing 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.thecurrentsauce.com 



We need writers! 

Our student newspaper needs stories 
written by students. Please join our staff. 
Come by our office, 227 Kyser. Meet- 
ings every Monday at 6 p.m. We hope 
to hear from you.- Current Sauce staff 



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Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 1 1 





Demons set to battle for chief 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Rivalry games are a big tradi- 
tion in college football. It is 
usually the last game of the 
eason, and two teams battle it out 
"or a year's worth of bragging rights. 

That will be the case this Satur- 
lay when the Demon football team 
nvites Southland Conference rival 
Stephen F. Austin to a 3 p.m. kick- 
)ff for the annual Battle for Chief 
addo. 

NSU is coming off of its mistake- 
iriven 43-17 loss against Sam Hous- 
on State, and the Demon football 
earn looks to improve its overall 
ecord to 6-5 with a win over a team 
hat has had its number for three 
:onsecutive years. 

"It's going to be a great show- 



down for Chief Caddo," Demon 
football head coach Bradley Dale 
Peveto said. "We are looking for- 
ward to winning the game and bring- 
ing him home." 

Peveto explained that even though 
SFA hasn't been a dominating foot- 
ball team this year, they will still 
present a challenge for the Demons. 

"SFA does a great job throwing 
the ball," Peveto said. They are the 
most improved Southland Confer- 
ence team over the last three weeks, 
and we are going against them when 
they are at their best." 
The game is also senior day for 
many key players on the Demon 
football team such as Demon tight 
end Justin Aldredge and Demon 
linebacker Yaser Elqutube. 
"There's no motivation needed," Al- 
dredge said. "This game means a lot 
to everybody and they all know what 



we are playing for." 

Elqutub added that despite not 
winning the conference champion- 
ship or making the playoffs, winning 
Chief Caddo is something that he 
looks forward to doing. 

"When I was a freshman, I re- 
member looking at this big statue 
and wondering what's it all about." 
Elqutub said. "I learned how rich the 
tradition is, and it's not something 
that you get easily even though NSU 
has won most of the battles, and I 
hope it stays that way." 

This tradition is 50 years old-dat- 
ing back to 1960-and NSU currently 
leads the series with 34 wins. 

"The way I see it is that Chief 
Caddo is my national champion- 
ship," Elqutub said. It's our chance 
to go out with a great record. "I'm 
looking forward to carrying that 
400-pound, eight-foot statue." 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Chief Caddo is the largest tro- 
phy in all of sports. It stands 
seven-foot-six and weighs 320 
pounds. The tradition to play 
for the prized trophy began 
in 1960 when NSU and SFA 
decided that the victor of the 
game would win a statue of 
Chief Caddo. NSU won the first 
game in 1961 by the score of 
35-19. 




Kilcoyne named 
acting director 



NSU News Bureau 

Dr. Margaret Kilcoyne has 
been named acting director 
of the School of Business 
at Northwestern State University. 
Kilcoyne will oversee the School of 
Business while a national search is 
done for a permanent director. 

Kilcoyne has been at Northwest- 
ern for 25 years as a faculty member 
and administrator. 

Since July 2010, she has been 
coordinator of assessment and aca- 
demic services and a full professor 
in the College of Science, Technol- 
ogy and Business. Kilcoyne assisted 
with the development and collection 
of required assessment items, as- 
sisted the director of the School of 
Business with accrediting agency 
requirements, managed Russell Hall 
and assisted with business outreach 
initiatives. 

From 2005 until 2010, Kilcoyne 




Student tutoring offered 



NSU News 
Bureau 



was director of business programs 
and an assistant professor, directing 
and coordinating five degree pro- 
grams. 

Kilcoyne joined Northwestern 
State's faculty in 1986 as an adjunct 
instructor and was named an instruc- 
tor in 1989. She was named coordi- 
nator of the Office of Cooperative 
Education in 1989, securing a five- 
year $409, 249 grant for the coop- 
erative education program. In 1998, 
she was promoted to an assistant 
professor and director of the Office 



of Cooperative Education. 

Kilcoyne has received a num- 
ber of honors for her research and 
teaching from her peers. In 2011, 
Kilcoyne received the ABIS Distin- 
guished Paper Award and in 2010, 
she received the ABC-Southwest 
Outstanding Researcher Award. In 
2009, she received the NSU Alumni 
Association's Excellence in Teach- 
ing Award for the College of Busi- 
ness. She received the Outstanding 
Doctoral Research Award from Del- 
ta Pi Epsilon in 2005. 



Kayla Winey 
Freshman Scholarship 
Recipient 

NSU students are able to get 
help though the free tutoring 
sessions available on campus. 
There are four tutoring sessions held 
every week here on campus at the 
Student Union, Student Support Ser- 
vices computer lab, HHP Building 
and Watson Library. 

"[At the tutoring center in the 
Student Union,] we offer tutoring, 
monitored study hall and assistance 
with studying," says Director Cath- 
erine Faucheaux. 

"My philosophy is that smart kids 
attend tutoring because they want to 
keep their grades up." 

Faucheaux also said that the sub- 
jects students get tutored in the most 
frequently include math and the sci- 
ences, particularly chemistry and 
biology. 



Tutor Becca Hunt, a senior in the 
Scholar's College, enjoys tutoring 
because it is a flexible job, and she 
enjoys helping people. 

"We offer study skills, stress man- 
agement and many other things," 
Hunt said. 

"Students come in all the time 
that need help with homework in 
core classes like science and math. 
We can even help with writing Eng- 
lish papers." 

The tutor centers give students 
help and encouragement to work on 
homework that might otherwise be 
harder if done on their own. 

"They help me do things that I 
couldn't do on my own," senior 
Andy West said. 

"I have a disability, so it's a lot 
easier to have them type as I speak 
out loud my thoughts for my paper." 

The Student Union tutoring center 
is open Monday through Thursday 
in room 240-B from 8 a.m. to 9:30 



p.m., and on Fridays, 8 a.m. to noon. 

The Student Support Services 
tutoring is offered in room 243 of 
Keyser Hall from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. Although 
it is only offered to students in the 
Student Support Services program, 
it can still be a valid tutoring place to 
get help when needed. 

Tutoring is also held on the 2nd 
floor reading room of Watson Li- 
brary from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. every 
Sunday through Thursday, and the 
Health and Human Performance 
building from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. every 
Monday through Thursday. 

If your grades are not up to par or 
you just know that this core subject 
is not something that you are strong 
in. take advantage of the free tutor- 
ing offered on campus. Appoint- 
ments are needed for most of the 
sessions, so make your appointment 
today and keep those grades high. 



SGA Notice: Nov. 14 meeting 



Submitted by Matt Morrison, 
SGA Treasurer 

The Student Government As- 
socaition meeting on Mon- 
day. November 14 was very 
eventful. 

Among the highlights were: a bill 
was put forth before the senate for 
a vote by business and accounting 
major Richard Sharp. 

The bill concerned the SGA loan, 
which currently does not have an 
option to finance. Any student bor- 
rowing money must pay back the 
full amount (up to SI 00) plus SI in- 
terest within thirty days. 

Senator Sharp's bill allows for 
students to take the option of fi- 
nancing their loan and extends the 
payback period by 30 more days. 
This bill, popular with the students, 
passed unanimously in the senate. 
Another significant piece of leg- 



islation was a bill that would have 
brought renowned rock climber and 
motivational speaker Aaron Ralston 
to speak at Northwestern. 

The bill, put up by the SGA's Aca- 
demic Affairs department, failed by 
a narrow margin in the senate due 
to concerns of budget and student 
opinion. 

It is expected that the presence 
of Mr. Ralston would be a generally 
agreeable circumstance for the uni- 
versity, and a suggestion was made 
to poll the students and bring the 
proposal back before the senate as 
soon as possible. 

One bill that would have created 
two new 24-hour computer labs was 
withdrawn by the author and was not 
discussed. 

New business for next week's 
meeting will include a bill that will 
modify the hours and methods by 
which senators will be able to sub- 



mit legislation and office hours to 
the Speaker and Vice President, re- 
spectively. 

Finally, a letter of impeachment 
was brought forth before the sen- 
ate by Senator Justin Kern Dollar 
regarding inappropriate and inflam- 
matory comments made by another 
senator during the previous week's 
meeting. The impeachment hearing 
will be held sometime during the 
week following Thanksgiving break. 

If any student has questions for 
the SGA, they can contact the SGA 
through their OrgSync website at 
nsula.orgsync.com/org/nsusga. 



All students are invited 
to attend SGA meetings. 
General meetings are held 
every Monday at 
7:00 p.m. in the Student 
I n ion President Room. 



Student Messenger Bulletin Board 

e-Student evaluation of course & instructor 

From Nov. 7 to Dec. 7, students have the opporunity to participate and complete evaluations 
for all the courses in which they are enrolled in this semester on the Moodle website. All 
evaluations are confidential and faculty will not see reports until the Spring 2012 semester. 

Christmas tree decoration contest 

Using five medical items, students can decorate Christmas trees and win prizes for the top 
best decorated trees. Pick up the rules, registration form and medical supplies at Health Ser- 
vices. Entry deadline is Nov. 28. 

Quit with a cold turkey sandwich 

Central Louisiana AHEC and Fresh Campus invite students to quit with a cold turkey sand- 
wich. On Nov. 1 7, any student who turns in a half pack of un-smoked cigarettes will receive a 
free turkey sandwich in the Student Union Lobby. 

Message from Dr. Abney 

Please be sure you see your Academic Advisor and register for the spring semester as soon as 
possible. As you may know, courses with low enrollment are often cancelled before we leave 
for winter break, so it behooves you to register early to ensure that the courses you need are 
available. Please take care of this important business asap. 



Index 1 


Wednesday 

74763° 


Thursday 

74743° 


Friday 

71747° 


Saturday 

79759° 


Sunday 

84759° 


Monday 

82755° 


Tuesday 

80756° 


2 Life 


5 Opinions 

6 Sports 


















Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student. nsula.edu 
November 16, 2011 



Fall Fest: giving a whole new 
meaning to Toys for Tots 



Andrew Bordelon 

Sauce reporter 

Dancing, games and an 
overall fun atmosphere filled 
the Friedman Student Union 
Ballroom last Thursday night as a 
result of Fall Fest put on by NSU's 
Helping Hands. 

"Discover the Kid in You" 
was this year's theme, and it was 
easy to see students find the kid in 
themselves as they played simple 
games like UNO, beanbag toss and 
musical chairs to name just a few. 

All of the games helped serve 
their purpose in making Fall Fest, 
"a fun break in the semester," 
senior English education major 
Sharonica Garrison said. 

She still saw Fall Fest as a 
helpful kind of relaxation before 
finals after participating in the 
event since her freshman year. 
Garrison said her favorite part of 
Fall Fest was the music. 

As different songs were played, 
the dance floor filled and thinned 
out sporadically as different groups 
of friends danced together, but it 
was never bare for longer than the 
time it took to change songs. 

Angel Johnson, junior 
psychology major, as if out of 
reflex, leaped from the table she 
was sitting on and joined in the 
synchronized dancing when one 
song came on. 

People that sat in chairs for the 
past fifteen minutes simply got up 
and covered the dance floor. 

If one glanced over the crowd, 
he could have seen young and old 
alike "backing it up" while igniting 



that small spark of childhood that 
Helping Hands wanted everyone to 
recapture. 

Johnson explained how several 
different RSOs contributed to 
make the event a success. 

Helping Hands could take much 
of the credit since nearly all of its 
members are a part of many RSOs 
on campus, like those that took 
part in Fall Fest. 

The NSU Angels, PLP, SAB 
and-Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity 
Incorporated were just a few of 
the student organizations that 
agreed to take part in the event by 
providing a game. 

The SGA helped "twist" up 
some childhood memories by 
providing the game TWISTER 
and combining six whole game 
sheets to form the giant cluster of 
students. 

SAB set up a PLINKO game 
run by sophomore biology major 
and Helping Hands member, 
Darrell Favis. 

"It's always fun," he said. "It 
brings the kid out in everybody." 

Another student that had fun 
while working was sophomore 
biology major Shadrielle Robbins. 

Last week's festival was the 
first one she had been to since she 
joined Helping Hands. 

Robbins explained that the 
organization would use different 
committees to ensure the many 
aspects of hosting the event were 
taken care of. 

The refreshments and 
decorations committees, for 
example, were two committees 
that kept the kid-like, happy 




Photo by Jamie Flanagan 

NSU students "twist up the semester" at Helping Hands Fall Fest, Thursday night. The event gave students the opportunity to relax before finals 
and donate the $1 admission fee to the charity, Toys for Tots. 



atmosphere going with candy for 
sugar rushes and colored balloons 
just for fun. 

One student in charge of the 
event as a whole was the Fall 
Fest Chairman, Lamario Fortson, 
freshman secondary education 
major. 

Fortson joined Helping Hands 
less than three months ago and 
immediately wanted to get 
involved. 

Fortson, with the help of 
the Helping Hands Fall Fest 
committee, coordinated with the 
different RSOs that participated. 

"Some organizations didn't 
show up," he said. "We had that 



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problem, but we we're still having 
fun." 

Fortson also stated that the 
other Helping Hands committees, 
"were so much help", and that 
the event would not have been 
successful without them. 

One major contributor glided 
across the dance floor in a mother- 
son dance. 

Mrs. Jamie Flanagan, advisor 
and instructor in the Student 
Support Services, and her son, Dez 
Williams, sophomore industrial 
engineer technology major, 
swayed together on the dance floor 
to a slow song while attendees 
watched. 



Flanagan has enjoyed serving 
as the Helping Hands advisor since 
2008, and she has been helping 
with Fall Fest since 2005. 

Fall Fest originally began at 
a local elementary school, but 
eventually the school started 
hosting the event itself. 

Helping Hands decided to 
continue to put on Fall Fest for 
NSU students instead of cancelling 
it for good, Flanagan said. 

Since then, the theme of Fall 
Fest has revolved around a fun, 
kid-like attitude to help students 
relax before finals and, "let their 
hair down," she said. 



Flanagan stated that the event 
is fun from the faculty perspective 
as well. 

"It allows us to bond with them 
informally and watch them have a 
good time," she said." 

Flanagan explained that 
Helping Hands will donate the $1 
admission charge at Fall Fest to 
buy toys for Toys for Tots. 

This will add to several other 
donations the organization has 
made, including but not limited 
to: $900 to a Relay for Life team, 
giving shoeboxes for soldiers 
with Westside Baptist Church and 
helping the Natchitoches Magnet 
School with its annual fundraiser. 



Theta Chi serves the Natchitoches community 




Photo by Cj Johnson 

Theta Chi service week consisted of events to improve the Northwestern State Campus and 
the Natchitoches community. The week included a clean-up in front of the Student Union, 
the courtyard and Highway 1 bypass. Another day involved having "Breakfast on the Bricks," 
which was their way of showing the students of Northwestern that Theta Chi cares for them. 
The fraternity provided a variety of breakfast foods including McDonald's biscuits and McGrid- 
dle cakes, cereal bars, pop tarts, hot chocolate, juice, etc. The fraternity also held fundraisers 
at Chili's and Raising Cane's Chicken Fingers restaurants for their newly adopted philanthropy, 
Starlight's Children's Foundation. 



The Great American Smoke Out Zoii 




Thursday 

November 17th 
11am- 1pm 

Turn in a 1/2 pack 
of unsmoked cigarettes 

and recieved a 
FREE Turkey Sandwich. 



Student Union Lobby 

For more information, please visit www.clahec.org/GASO.htm 



@ NSU 



(HTMl MMMM AOivttws ftmtfal By 



!C iP The Rapides Found/ 



JNDATION 




Comics 



thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
November 16, 2011 





. by Charles Barry Townsend 



ARE THE LONG diagonal lines shown above 
straight and parallel? 

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AMERICAN GENIUSES! 

In this puzzle grid there is 
room for the names of 
eight famous American 
inventors. Below are 
hints to get you started. 
There is a dark frame 
around one of the 
columns in the grid. If you 
correctly name all of the inventors, the letters in the frame, top to bottom, will 
spell out the name of the man who made radio possible. 




A CROOKED CALCULATION! A dishonest tradesman 
measured out 20 feet of rope lor a customer. Using a yard- 
stick that was 3 inches too short, how much rope "didn't" 
the customer get? 

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IT'S MAGIC! Use the numbers 4 through 13 to fill in our Magic 
Square. The numbers in each horizontal row and vertical col- 
umn should total 47. We've filled in six of the squares. The rest 
is up to you. 

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1 . He had over 1 ,000 patents. 

2. He perfected the sewing machine. 

3. Made sailing in calm weather easy. 

4. Made a wheat harvesting machine 

5. Invented bifocal eyeglasses. 

6 Made a machine for sending messages 

7. Had his ups and downs. 

8. Invented a machine to clean cotton. 



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Super Crossword 



SIMPLE MATH 



ACROSS 

1 "That was a 
close one!" 

5 Horror-film 
extras 

9 E-junk? 
13 Football 
team 

19 Troubadour's 
instrument 

20 Each 

21 Holy 
headgear 

22 Fill with fizz 

23 Taj town 

24 West, 
alliance 

25 Like — of 
bricks 

26 Cheese- 
maker's 
need 

27 Start of a 
remark 

31 Busy bug 

32 Initials of 
interest? 

33 Snuggled up 
37 Iraqi city 
40 — de deux 
42 Require- 
ments 

45 Bristol brew 

46 Chalky 
cheese 

47 Tidied the 
terrace 

49 Word form 
for "bird" 

51 Compete 

52 Hotelier 
Helmsley 

54 Take in, 
perhaps 



56 Actress 
Thurman 

57 Fury 

59 Part 2 of 

remark 
61 Standish's 

stand-in 
63 Day or ' 

Duke 

66 Foreman's 
fortes 

67 French port 

69 Rap 
session? 

70 Dry run 
74 Part 3 of 

remark 

77 Encounter 

78 Diva Maria 

80 Plaza Hotel 
kid 

81 Ewe said it! 

83 Massenet 
opera 

84 Mistreat 

85 Part 4 of 
remark 

90 Diocese 

91 Fix a fight 

92 Spartan 
serf 

95 Pith helmet 

96 Make lace 
98 They're out 

of this world 
101 Early eman- 
cipator 

103 TV's "The 
Twilight — " 

104 Kimono 
closer 

1 05 Snowy bird 

106 Relative 
of -ator 



107 Mad 

general? 
1 09 Duncan's 

murderer 
112 Olive 

product 

114 Tighten the 
tent 

115 End of 
remark 

124 "On the 
Waterfront" 
star 

127 Gymnast 
Korbut 

128 Plunder 

1 29 Carry out 
orders 

1 30 Confer 

131 Singer 
Campbell 

132 Frank or 
Francis 

133 Forsaken 

134 Ringed 
orbiter 

135 Manuscript 
enc. 

136 Pilsner 

1 37 — ranch 

DOWN 

1 Realty 
map 

2 O'Brian or 
Downs 

3 Raison d' — 

4 Put on 

5 '71 Woody 
Allen 

film 

6 Separately 

7 Shopper's 
sack 



8 Primer 
pooch 

9 Like some 
Cheddar 

10 Coaching 
legend 

11 Burn 
remedy 

12 Cadfael, for 
one 

13 Fervent 

14 Yorkshire 
city 

15 Surrealist 
Max 

16 Heflin or 
Cliburn 

17 When Paris 
sizzles 

18 Badminton 
divider 

28 Bend 
someone's 
- (yak) 

29 Dispatch 

30 Delhi 
denizen 

34 Shirley's 
sidekick 

35 Ransom — 
Olds 

36 Scottish 
river 

37 Complaint 

38 Perched 
on 

39 Rational 

40 Brazilian 
kicker 

41 Address 
abbr. 

43 Learned 

44 Snare 

46 Mr. Ziegfeld 



48 "America's 

Most 

Wanted" 

host 
50 Conceal 
53 NASA 

affirmative 
55 English 

explorer 
58 Wander 
60 Greenhouse 

items 
62 Miss 
64 "— Station 

Zebra" 

('68 film) 
65 Salon 

request 

67 Toilet 
water 

68 Ever's 
partner 

69 Mikita or 
Musial 

70 Pt. of the 
whole 

71 Team 
scream 

72 Stretchy 

73 Ballet 
movement 

75 More mys- 
terious 

76 Diminish 
79 Disoriented 
82 Tread the 

boards 

84 Flying 
brother 

85 Price 

86 Gloppy 

87 "Once — a 
midnight 
dreary . . ." 



88 Hawaii's 
state bird 

89 Place- 
kicker's prop 

93 Zola or 
Griffith 

94 Rock's — 
Lobos 

96 Hen's 
hubby 

97 "The — 
Daba 

Honeymoon" 
('14 song) 
99 Disappoint 
100 Silly trio 
102 Fall fashion 
108 FBI 

employee 

110 Swahili, e.g. 

111 Witch's 
home 

113 Pointless 

114 Conversa- 
tion piece? 

116 Grabs all 
the goodies 

117 Poet Wilcox 

118 Thick slice 

119 Actor 
Franchot 

1 20 Winter woe 

121 Hunt's"— 
Ben 

Adhem" 

122 Dweeb 

123 Actress 
Daly 

124 Small shot 

125 Stephen of 
"Ready to 
Wear" 

126 Nova Scotia 
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Opinions 



thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
November 16, 2011 



Atherton 
on cancer, 
safety and 
smoking 



interview by Erich Tanner, 
Guest Columnist 



A discussion is going on 
A-\ in regards to making 

"T^orthwestern State 
University a 100% smoke-free 
campus. To help move 
the discussion along, a 
Campus Tobacco Task 
Force was appointed 
to make policy 
recommendations to 
the President and his 
cabinet. 

The topic will be 
discussed over the next 
several months, so it 
made sense to interview the Faculty 
Senate President, Dr. Jack Atherton. 

It would have been enough for 
him to voice his opinion about the 
issue, but Dr. Atherton, as you may 
or may not know, is also a cancer 
survivor. I had not spoken with Dr. 
Atherton prior to the interview so I 
did not know what to expect. 

Let's say I was pleasantly 
surprised to find an opinionated 
individual whose views were not 
based on emotion but on reasonable 
thinking and a strong will to 
carry out education in the most 
responsible way possible. 

His reasonable nature was 
evident as he related his longtime 
interaction with secondhand smoke. 
"I grew up in a household of 
smokers. My parents exposed me 
to it, as did friends and neighbors, 
at church, in the community; it was 




Dr. Jack 
Atherton 



part of the culture. 

*'I can't be angry at them. They 
cared very much for me. They just 
didn't know. I went and worked in 
prisons, a smoke filled 
world, and to make extra 
money I bartended in 
another smoke filled 
environment." It may 
have been just a part of 
the culture but it became 
much more w hen he was 
diagnosed with cancer. 

The type of cancer 
Dr. Atherton was 
diagnosed with was squamous cell 
carcinoma. It is "the type of cancer 
smokers and dippers get," but he 
assured me he had neither smoked 
nor dipped. 

Dr. Atherton believes it was the 
smoked filled spaces he moved 
through during his life that led to 
the development of a cancer so 
commonly found in tobacco users. 
Even with this knowledge, it is a 
not a subject he allows emotion to 
control. 

According to Dr. Atherton, it 
is not an issue of freedom and 
rights so much as it is about safety, 
and the responsibility he and the 
university have to ensure a healthy 
place to work and learn. 

Dr. Atherton recognizes there are 
policies in place already at NSU and 
in society to ensure safety. These 
policies range from restrictions 



on noise levels to regulations in 
dealing with substances such as 
asbestos, but somehow it seems 
acceptable to disperse toxins from 
burning cigarettes into the air. 

He admits he does not like 
government control; however Dr. 
Atherton stated, "When individuals 
are infringing on me and others 
indiscriminately, if the government 
does not protect the public, it is not 
doing its job." 

And while he believes "the 
simplest of solutions is for people 
to respect the rights and spaces of 
others," I would argue smoking is 
an activity that by its nature invades 
the rights and spaces of others. 

This idea of protection, Dr. 
Atherton says, is "a duty care the 
University owes to all on campus 
and it is the University's obligation 
to maintain a safe environment." He 
believes that smoking is not a right 
but a privilege. 

The right infringed upon is 
the right to breathe clean air. It is, 
as he says, "a duty" owed to all 
individuals on campus including 
the K- 1 2 students who may be 
negatively influenced by adults who 
model smoking behavior. 

It is my understanding that state 
law prohibits smoking on K-12 
school campuses. This does not 
demonstrate positive leadership. 
Indeed, change is difficult but to 
abandon what we know about 



the detrimental health etlects of 
smoking would be irresponsible. 

Dr. Atherton experienced this 
change firsthand w hile holding 
the position of w arden in a federal 
prison and went on to describe the 
smooth transition. Concerning the 
banning of smoking in his prison 
he told me, "We knew no-smoking 
was coming. We were given a date 
it would be prohibited by, as I recall 
twelve to fifteen months down the 
road. Washington let the prisons 
decide how to do it." 

He went on to describe the 
implementation period he set up 
which included cessation services, 
education, awareness to change. 

Several staff members took it 
as an opportunity to quit w hile 
the prisoners accepted the change 
because they knew it was going to 
happen regardless. It was as smooth 
as it could be and it can be the same 
at NSU as well. 

This is an opportunity for NSU 
to move into a leadership role, both 
regionally and nationally. Currently 
over 586 universities and colleges 
across the nation have gone smoke- 
free, a 3 1 56% increase since 2005 
(ANRF.20U). 

Isn't it time NSU joins the list of 
colleges and universities that have 
recognized the need to improve the 
safety and health of their campus 
environment? 



Music isn't 
dead, just 
buried 



Jarred Roberts 

Guest Columnist 



2 




011 
seems 
to be 
another 
mile marker 
as we get 
farther and 
farther from 
"good" music. 
At least it's a common belief that 
the ability to skillfully play a guitar 
died with Kurt Cobain. 

While these people would prefer 
white noise to today's modern radio, 
it does not mean music is dead. It's 
just hard to find, and looking for 
new music online is a great form of 
procrastination. 

Pandora and Last FM are the 
most common treasure troves for 
new bands. Pandora is a nifty tool 
for some background noise, while 
Last FM is a bit more hands-on. Its 



radio isn't as good, but it gives in 
depth bios and an extensive list of 
similar popular artists. 

These aforementioned websites' 
major flaws are that those familiar 
with the genre really won't find 
anything new. These sites weren't 
built for the hipsters. If you want 
to listen to a band no one has ever 
heard of, then look elsewhere and 
there are a few websites that are 
great for discovering new music 
that don't require your favorite band 
as a springboard. 

An odd music site, The Sixty 
One, is currently always open in my 
tabs when I'm online. It plays songs 
based on which mood you select 
and even has categories for covers 
and remixes. This is a good site if 
you want to be more underground. 
To this day I have only come across 
two artists I had previously known. 
Giant murals of the bands in their 
aloof poses and plaid shirts stare 
you down while their music plays. 

Recently they've implemented 
a sort of quest system (users listens 
to songs from a certain mood, 
comment on X amount of songs 
etc.). It's an interesting concept that 
I hope gets further developed. 



Recently, a site called One Track 
Mind has gotten my attention. 
Their website is one of the few 
sites around that sports an "indie- 
country" genre- a moderate sized 
selection of genres that will 
probably only fail to appeal to 
lovers of metal. 

Songs are posted somewhat 
sporadically-meaning my 
only complaint goes to lack of 
consistency-but a wealth of 
information is given with these 
songs. 

The songs have ratings, an 
extensive bio of the band and 
similar songs from this site. The 
main advantage of this place is that 
users are not only able to stream the 
songs that they post about, but they 
can also download links for free 
with no signup required. 

Music isn't dead, but merely 
hidden. These websites, while 
engaging on their own are 
simple enough to be background 
soundtracks that you can use to 
discover new songs. 

Better yet, you can dive into 
them with your full attention to find 
some great music before sending 
your teacher an email asking for an 
extension. 




The 

CurrentSauce 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 




Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



Jesus was a socialist 



Catherine Beverly 

Co-Editor 



a mencan 
JpUk, /\ Christian^ 
ML' 'A has developed 

vflft some strange 
__^^HLj contradictions as 
our nation has 
established one of 
the highest standards of living in the 
world. These contradictions seem 
most apparent in what is now called 
"Christian capitalism." 

Capitalism is a system that takes 
advantage of the work force to 
provide goods or services at a lower 
price for manufacturers. Socialism, 
on the other hand, is a system that 
stresses equality and focuses on 
community, rather than individual, 
gain. 



This is where confusion sets in. 
If the Christian faith has so many 
instances of the sharing of wealth 
and the aiding of the poor, why 
are modern Americans so set on 
believing that capitalism is an all- 
around better economic system? 

A survey taken by Rasmussen 
Reports in 2010 says that 60 percent 
of adults in the United States 
believe that capitalism is better 
than socialism. While 2 1 percent 
are unsure in this survey, only 18 
percent of U.S. adults believe that 
socialism is better than or equal to 
capitalism. 

The Bible says that "neither said 
any of them that ought of the things 
which he possessed was his own; 
but they had all things common." 
(Acts 4:32) This sure sounds like 
socialism to me. 

Later in Acts, when a follower 



named Ananias keeps part of the 
sale of his possessions for himself, 
Peter says to him: "Why hath Satan 
filled thine heart to lie to the Holy 
Ghost, and to keep back part of the 
price of the land?" (Acts 5:3) 

This seems like proof enough 
that the Bible would be in support 
of ideas like socialism and 
completely against capitalism. So 
against it, in fact, that the follower 
and his wife were punished severely 
for their actions. 

In the multiple articles I've read, 
the Biblical support of "Christian 
capitalism" seems to be lacking. 
They bring to attention the major 
flaw in socialism, laziness, but 
that is their only defense of their 
position. 

One writer in support of 
"Christian capitalism" believes 
that capitalism offers more for the 



"dignity of the individual", and is 
thus superior to socialism from a 
Christian standpoint. 

While I'm sure Christianity 
believes in the importance of the 
individual, it stresses the idea that 
wealth will not make you better 
than another person and that "it is 
easier for a camel to go through the 
eye of a needle, than for a rich man 
to enter into the kingdom of God." 
(Mark 10:24) 

Why this stress on living the 
good life and occasionally deigning 
to give a little support to your 
fellow brethren? It is nothing more 
than a byproduct of being human. 
Social Darwinism used "survival of 
the fittest" to explain the problem 
of the rich getting richer and the 
poor getting poorer, but now' some 
Christians are using the Bible to 
explain greed and selfishness. 



We need writers! 



Our newspaper 
needs stories writ- 
ten by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Keyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings are every 
Monday at 6 p.m. 

We hope to hear 
from you! 

- Current Sauce 
staff 




Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



Rants: Republicans, 
meltdowns and the 
political spectrum 

Have you noticed the circus 
that has become the GOP as 
of late? 

Let me first make a disclaimer: 
I am in no way hoping to dissuade 
you, dear reader, from voting for 
or expressing conservative or 
Republican sentiments. The words 
of Voltaire should be echoing now. 

According to the Huffington 
Post, Michelle Bachman warns 
of Iranians sneaking across the 
Mexican border. Gov. Rick Perry 
can never seem to remember his 
arguments in debates. Herman Cane 
has sexual harassment allegations 
surrounding his campaign. 

Sarah Palin (although not 
running for president) quit the 
prestigious one-in-fifty-position 
of governorship to become a Fox 
News analyst. Donald Trump, Rudi 
"9/11" Giuliani, senile John McCain 
and George Bush's two terms in 
office are proof of the circus in the 
GOP. 

Why is this the case? What 
happened to the days of Reagan, 
Eisenhower, T. Roosevelt and 
Lincoln? Even if you disagree with 
their political ideas, at least the 
were coherent. 

Even John Boehner, one of the 
most solid conservatives in current 
politics, nearly drove the country 
into an economic woe (along with 
others from both sides). 

I believe it is an effect of several 
things. 

Now, I find it surprisingly too 
coincidental that the newer and 
more radical (in terms of politics) 
Tea Party would had nothing to 
do with the misadventures of 
conservative leaders. 

The Tea Party does not 
have crazy ideas. They favor 
simplification of government and 
for the justification and reducing of 
taxes. 

The Tea Party represents about 
1 5 percent of Congress at the 
moment. As the Republicans stir 
up support for 2012, the GOP 
candidates must respect potential 
voters who are Tea Party followers. 
As they are more radical, the 
candidates must appeal to some or 
all of this radical nature. 

Yet, none of this explains sexual 
harassment allegations, quitting the 
governorship for a higher paying 
(and more spotlight) job or harping 
on one thing for ten years. 

I also think that in the effort to 
please both moderate and radical 
conservative voters, many GOP 
leaders have exhausted themselves. 
You just can't please everyone. 

Also, given the appeal of 
Kardashian-type fame, it is not 
surprising that some of the less than 
savory members of the GOP would 
use a similar model to promote not 
only a few political ideas, but also 
themselves instead. 

This is certainly true in the case 
of Palin, who became a regular on 
Fox News and hosted a few TV 
shows on cable, and also the case of 
Donald Trump who is always after 
self-promotion. 

Whatever seems to be the bother 
with the GOP, I wonder if they can 
sort themselves out in time for the 
2012 Presidential Election. They 
have a year. That seems like plenty 
of time. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
November 16, 2011 



Lady Demons secure tournament bid 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Lady Demon Stacey DiFrancesco spikes the ball past two Nicholls State University defenders. NSU won the match in straight sets. 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Trailing 24-20 in the first set, 
the Northwestern State vol- 
leyball team reeled off the 
next six points in a row to win 
the opening frame, and then used a 
monster performance from Stacey 
DiFrancesco to cruise to a straight 
set victory over Nicholls State on 
Saturday at Prather Coliseum - 26- 
24, 25-16 and 25-19. 

"We definitely came together as a 
team today, especially after winning 
that first set. It was a huge momen- 
tum boost and it carried us through 
the rest of the match," said DiFran- 
cesco, a freshman from The Wood- 
lands, Texas. 

The victory for NSU (10-19, 
6-10) over Nicholls State (18-14, 
5-11) clinches a berth next weekend 
in the Southland Conference Tour- 
nament. 

"We knew coming in we had to 
win and were confident because we 
knew we had already beaten Nich- 
olls this season," said co-head coach 
Hugh Hernesman. "We had more 
weapons, and more firepower which 
helped us execute the game-plan of- 
fensively." 

DiFrancesco finished with her 
19th double-double of the season 
with 20 kills, 1 1 digs and a career- 
high hitting percentage of .326. The 
20 kills is also a career-best in a 
three-set match. 

"Stacey made a huge difference in 
the match," Hernesman said. "Sta- 
cey is really competitive and has a 
lot of fire to her. She made sure the 
team kept the intensity up the whole, 
way." 

Kelly Jimenez recorded her 10th 
double-double of the season with 13 
kills (.265) and 10 digs. 



"Kelly has been really steady for 
us all season. She had some really 
crucial digs in the second set to help 
us keep runs going," Hernesman 
said. "Kelly is coming off an injury 
from last week, and after a full-week 
of practice this week she was espe- 
cially great in .the service-receive 
game." 

Vanessa Coleman, Mackenzie 
Neely and Nicole Hajka also pro- 
pelled the offense with 10 (.259), 
seven (.364) and six kills (.333), re- 
spectively. 

Emily Sweet dished out a match- 
high 45 assists, and also dug up 



seven. 

"Sweet did a great job of getting 
our players in the right spots to be 
successful," Hernesman said. 

On defense, Keelie Arneson reg- 
istered a match-high 21 digs, while 
Jessica Guttierrez scooped up seven. 

"Keelie was going after every- 
thing today and really played great," 
Hernesman said. "Her defense was 
another huge factor in the match and 
really made a difference for us." 

For Nicholls, Jennifer Brandt led 
the team with nine kills, 1 2 digs and 
a .450 hitting percentage. Jordan 
Karst tallied a double-double with 



16 assists and 10 digs. 

The first set didn't start the way 
NSU planned, down 9-1. After a 5-1 
run, the Lady Demons had cut the 
deficit to 15-11 after a couple kills 
by DiFrancesco, but the Colonels 
defense was giving in and Nicholls 
extended its lead to 19-13. 

NSU found itself down 20-24 
when it flipped the switch and went 
on the decisive run of the match. It 
all started with a kill by DiFrances- 
co, and then she followed it up with 
an ace to make it 22-24. Then after a 
kill by Neely, a miscue by the Colo- 
nels tied it, 24-24. 



Another ace by DiFrancesco gave 
the Lady Demons their first lead of 
the set, and then a kill by Hajka fin- 
ished it, 26-24. 

NSU took the final six points in 
the first and improved its first-set re- 
cord on the season to 19-10. 

DiFrancesco led the way in the 
frame with seven kills, while Arne- 
son dug up 12. Tremendous defense 
kept NSU in the set, as Jimenez also 
had six digs, while Sweet and Gut- 
tierrez each had four. 

"We were full on confidence in 
this match, especially after the first 



set. After that comeback, the team 
was just ready to win," said Cole- 
man, a freshman from Bloomington. 
HI. 

NSU was up 7-6 in the second 
when it went on a modest 3-1 run to 
get ahead, 10-7. Nicholls came back 
to tie it 13-13, but again the Lady 
Demons turned on the jets and took 
five in a row after four spikes by 
DiFrancesco made it 18-13. 

Still leading 21-16, NSU finished 
the second in similar fashion, run- 
ning away with the final four points 
to win 25-16 when a good set by 
Arneson aided DiFrancesco's crush- 
ing attack. 

DiFrancesco hammered 10 kills 
in the second and hit at an astound- 
ing .625 mark. As a team, the Lady 
Demons hit .526, including four 
kills from Coleman (.667) and Hajka 
(.800). 

The teams were even much of 
the third set, going back-and-forth 
to a 16-16 stalemate. Neely then 
sparked a 5-0 run with a couple kills, 
and got the Lady Demons ahead. 21- 
16. NSU was not going to be denied 
after this, and ended the final two 
points with kills from Coleman and 
Jimenez, 25-19. 

Jimenez had her biggest set of the 
season in the third, slamming nine 
kills and hit at a .571 mark. 

"It's really big for this program 
to get to the conference tourna- 
ment this season with such a young 
team and not even having a senior," 
Hernesman said. "Making the tour- 
nament was one of our goals at the 
beginning of the year and is a really 
big step for us." 

NSU will take on top-seeded Tex- 
as State on Friday at 4 p.m. in the 
first round of the Southland Confer- 
ence Tournament in Conway, Ark. 





@ NSU 

RESULTS 

Student Secondhand 
'moke Exposure Survey 

(N=454) 




01: Exposure to secondhand smoke is dangerous to nonsmokers. 
94% Somewhat Agree to Strongly Agree 
2% Unsure 

4% Somewhat Disagree to Strongly Disagree 

Q2: The University has a responsibility to protect nonsmoking students from 
involuntary exposure to secondhand smoke. 
79% Somewhat Agree to Strongly Agree 
7% Unsure 

14% Somewhat Disagree to Strongly Disagree 

Q3: NSU has a responsibility to provide a smoke- free environment for the K-12 
students housed on campus. 

92% Somewhat Agree to Strongly Agree 
3% Unsure 

6% Somewhat Disagree to Strongly Disagree 

Q4: The right to breathe clean air should take precedence over the right to smoke. 
79% Somewhat Agree to Strongly Agree 
8% Unsure 

13% Somewhat Disagree to Strongly Disagree 

Q5: Would you support passage of a 100% smoke- free campus policy at NSU? 
75% Somewhat Agree to Strongly Agree 
7% Unsure 

17% Somewhat Disagree to Strongly Disagree 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Demon defensive lineman Lesley Deamer and linebacker Derek Rose corral the Sam Houston Bearkat. 

Bearkats cruise past Demons 

Courtesy of Sports Info: 



Third-ranked and unbeaten, Sam 
Houston State looked every bit the 
part of the Southland Conference's 
outright football champion Saturday 
while whipping visiting Northwest- 
ern State 43-17. 

Tim Flanders and Richard Sin- 
cere each scored two touchdowns 
while Brian Bell threw for a pair of 
scores for the Bearkats. Meanwhile, 
the Demons' offense couldn't find 
the end zone against a speedy Sam 
Houston defense until D.J. Palmer 
rammed 1 yard to score with 5:11 
remaining. 

That tally provided the second of 
two positive footnotes for NSU. The 
Demons' 17 points are the second- 
most allowed by Sam Houston, who 
has held all of their other eight FCS 
foes to 14 points or less, and all but 
one to just one TD. 

Three of the Demons' total came 
from junior kicker John Shaugh- 
nessy, who extended his school 
record for consecutive field goals 
made to 1 2 with a 34-yarder midway 
through the third period. 

The outcome dropped NSU to 5-5 
overall, 3-3 in the SLC, hoping to 
post a winning season next Saturday 



afternoon at home against old rival 
Stephen F. Austin. 

The Bearkats claimed their first 
outright Southland football title in 
24 years of conference membership 
while rising to 1 0-0 overall and com- 
pleting their league slate at 7-0. 

They play a non-conference game 
at Texas State next week, then await 
their FCS playoff assignment, likely 
a first-round bye into a home game. 

"What a very good, very solid, 
very explosive football team," said 
Demons' coach Bradley Dale Pe- 
veto. "What you saw today is what 
we've seen on every game tape. 
They are sound in every phase of the 
game. They hit you with big plays. 
They are very, very good defensive- 
ly, especially against the run. They 
had turned it over only six times all 
year coming into today, so that tells 
you how sound they are." 

Even though the Demons recov- 
ered two fumbles, they couldn't slow- 
down Sam Houston's running game. 
Flanders became the first back to 
run for 100 yards against NSU with 
145 on 20 carries, and his teammates 
added 98 more on the ground. 

Bell threw for 200 yards on 10 of 
14 aim. Sincere caught three passes 
for 1 02 yards and ran for 75 more on 



11 tries. 

Meanwhile, the Demons managed 
to run for only 64 yards against the 
nation's No. 1 -ranked rush defense, 
which was allowing an average of 
just 55.8. 

For the second straight week, 
NSU was burned for three third- 
quarter touchdowns as Sam Houston 
more than doubled a 16-point half- 
time advantage and turned the con- 
test into a blowout. 

The Bearkats didn't dominate the 
first half except on the scoreboard, 
where a 23-7 lead didn't reflect the 
modest 189-137 yardage advantage 
by SHSU. 

"We helped them with our turn- 
overs. They scored on one, got a 
field goal off another, and without 
those it's a 13-7 game at halftime," 
said Peveto. "The other major fail- 
ure for us was coverage breakdow ns 
that allowed them to hit big plays in 
the passing game. Their quarterback 
kept plays alive and while he was 
scrambling we didn't keep tabs on 
every receiver, and that really cost 
us." 

A 35-yard touchdown catch and 



For the rest of this story, check 
out www.thecurrenlsauce.com 




u rrent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, December 7, 2011 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 97: Issue 12 



Students travel From Natchitoches to Cartagena 




Students from a senior level business class traveled to Cartagena over 
the Thanksgiving break to meet fellow students. The students worked 
together to complete the project and learn more about each other's cul- 
tures. 



NSU News Bureau 

For Arielle Craige, meeting 
students at the Universita- 
ria Tecnologico Comfenalco 
in Cartagena, Colombia, was like 
meeting old friends. Craige and fel- 
low classmates had been interacting 
with their counterparts at the Co- 
lombian university throughout the 
fall semester via video conferencing 
and Facebook. 

The students met face to face dur- 
ing the Thanksgiving break when the 
senior level business class, accom- 
panied by their professor Dr. Marcus 
Jones, vice president for University 
Affairs, and Dr. Lisa Abney, vice 
president for Academic and Student 
Affairs, traveled to Cartagena for a 
round table discussion on the U.S./ 
Colombia Free Trade Agreement. 

"The most valuable part to me 
was getting a chance to experience 



so much of the culture, learn about 
the city of Cartagena and meet peo- 
ple with great attitudes," Craige, 
who had never traveled outside the 
United States, said. "They shared so 
many stories about the city." 

The journey was the culmina- 
tion of a semester's study in interna- 
tional commerce in which students 
researched the trade agreement and 
prepared to discuss its pros and cons 
with counterparts at Comfenalco. 
who have studied the topic through- 
out their college careers. 

"We felt as though we already 
knew each other," she said. 

During the debate, the groups 
discussed trade aspects of two Co- 
lombian exports, passion fruit and 
plastics, with the help of a mediator. 

The debates were held in English, 
though there were two fluent Span- 
ish speakers in the American group 
and most of the Colombian students 



spoke conversational English. 

"It was a positive discussion," 
Craige said. "Each group brought 
their points across and tried to focus 
on the positive." 

The Northwestern State students 
presented the Colombian students 



with specially designed t-shirts that 
promoted the partnership between 
the two schools. They also sat in on a 
business class in which Comfenalco 
business students were learning to 
use Excel in Spanish. 

"It was beyond anything I'd 



ever experienced to be able to see 
the university and that environment 
of study. It is a beautiful university 
with great technology," said Craige, 
a New Orleans native who noted that 
Cartagena's narrow streets, historic 
buildings and city plaza reminded 
her of her hometown. 

While in Cartagena, Jones and 
Abney signed an agreement on be- 
half of Northwestern State to offer 
dual enrollment opportunities for the 
Colombian students and develop ex- 
change opportunities for students at 
both universities. 

They also met with officials at 
Univesidad Libre, Sede Cartagena, 
to begin finalizing a second such 
agreement. 

The trip also provided an opportu- 
nity to visit Cartagena high schools 
in recruiting initiatives. 

The delegation visited a lab school 
affiliated with Comfenalco and were 
treated to an impressive student 



symphony performance, raising the 
possibility of recruiting students 
with a music background to attend 
Northwestern State. 

"The highlight for me was see- 
ing my students interact with the Co- 
lombian students," said Jones, who 
raised the majority of funding for the 
trip through external sources. 

Jones would like to offer the ad- 
vanced business course every fall 
and explore the possibility of hosting 
a delegation of Colombian students 
for a similar debate in the spring. 

The trip was covered by the 
Shreveport Times, which provided 
a blog in which the students shared 
their daily experiences as they ex- 
plored Cartagena. 



For more information on this 
program and possible other 
classes, contact Dr. Marucs 
Jones at (318)357-5700. 



Health 

Services 

for 

students 

Emily Walter 
Sauce Reporter 

For a student feeling ill, or just 
seeking health related informa- 
tion, the Health Services Clin- 
ic at Northwestern State University 
is available to assist them. 

The members of the nursing staff 
are Ashley Jordan, RN, and Eva Har- 
rell, RN. Stephanie Campbell, RN, 
is the director of health services. 

Campbell explained that through 
payment of the Health Services Fees, 
the health clinic offers a variety of 
services to students. 

"The clinic performs assessment 
of acute illnesses or injuries, pro- 
vides some over-the-counter medi- 
cation, and can change bandages and 
remove stitches, " said Campbell. 

Condoms can be picked up for 
free at the clinic, and "birth control 
and women's health is in the works" 
said Campbell. The clinic is current- 
ly negotiating services and supplies 




Submitted photo 

Nurses at Health Services designed and put together artwork, which is 
displayed inside and outside the Health Services building. 



for women's health 

"We also offer STD testing for 
S10, and it includes treatment if pos- 
itive. The $10 goes on a student's ac- 
count as optional health service for 
privacy," said Campbell. 

If a student needs to see a doc- 
tor, Campbell said, "the clinic makes 
referrals to Ingram Medical Clinic 
here in Natchitoches." 
Health Services is located on 315 
Caspari Street on Northwestern 
State University's main campus. 



connected to the University Police 
station. 

The clinic operating hours in fall 
and spring semesters are from 7:30 
a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays through 
Thursdays and from 7:30 a.m. to 12 
p.m. on Fridays. During the summer, 
clinic operating hours are from 7:30 
a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays through 
Thursdays and closed on Fridays. 

To contact Health Services, call 
(318) 357-5351, or email Campbell 
at campbells@nsula.edu. 



Purcell to 
speak 
at Fall 
Graduation 



NSU News Bureau 

Louisiana Commissioner of 
Higher Education Dr. Jim 
Purcell will be the speaker at 
Fall Commencement Exercises Fri- 
day, Dec. 16, in Prather Coliseum. 

Purcell will speak to graduates 
from the College of Arts and Letters 
and the College of Education and 
Human Development at 10 a.m. 

He will address graduates from 
the College of Nursing and Allied 
Health and the College of Science, 
Technology and Business at 3 p.m. 

Purcell was named commissioner 
in February. He previously served as 



the state higher education execu- 
tive in Arkansas and associate vice 
chancellor for strategic planning in 
Oklahoma. 

Purcell oversees and supervises 
the operations of the Board of Re- 
gents' staff and represents the state's 
postsecondary education commu- 
nity at the state and federal level as 
well as with the general public. 

He is actively engaged in imple- 
menting Louisiana's premier piece 
of higher education legislation, the 
Granting Resources and Autonomy 
for Diplomas (GRAD) Act, as well 
as the Performance-Based Funding 
Formula. 



New opportunities in Marksville 



NSU News Bureau 

Officials from Northwestern 
State University participated 
in ribbon cutting ceremonies 
at the Tunica-Biloxi Cultural and 
Educational Resource Center on 
the Tunica-Biloxi Reservation in 
Marksville. Northwestern State will 
offer courses at the facility begin- 
ning in the spring semester. 

Dr. Darlene Williams, vice presi- 
dent for technology, research and 
economic development, and Profes- 
sor of Anthropology Dr. Hiram F. 
"Pete" Gregory spoke at the dedica- 
tion along with Tribal Chairman Earl 
Barbry Sr., members of the Tribal 
Council and state and local officials. 

The 40,000-square-foot museum 
houses the largest collection of Euro- 
pean and Native American artifacts 



from the Colonial period. It also will 
have Tunica artifacts on display and 
will house traveling exhibits. It also 
will feature a gift shop, tribal offic- 
es, library, restoration/conservation 
laboratory, exhibit hall, classrooms, 
auditorium, video/audio conference 
rooms and computer labs. 

"I came here for the first time 52 
years ago. The place where the Cen- 
ter is was a big potato patch," said 
Gregory. "I think about the old peo- 
ple who dreamed about this place, 
which is a place of spirits. The spir- 
its of those people are here. This is a 
sacred place." 

Gregory has worked closely with 
the Tunica-Biloxi for decades. 

"The Tunica Biloxi have been 
here 300 years and have struggled 
to keep their land," he said. "When 
Earl Barbry Sr. became chairman. 



he wanted to do something with the 
tribal land such as build housing and 
I was proud to be able to help him. 

"I have watched this museum be- 
ing built. They say good things take 
a long time and this has taken a long 
time. This is a place where living 
and learning will take place and it is 
a wonderful example." 

The Northwestern State classes 
being offered at the Center will be 
open to any area resident wishing to 
attend. 

"The university will offer educa- 
tional opportunities for undergradu- 
ate and graduate students," said Wil- 
liams. "The building's unique design 
and common spaces will provide our 
world-class faculty unprecedented 



For the rest of the story, visit 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Messenger Bulletin Board 

Honor Society toy drive 

The NSU chapter of Kappa Mu Epsilon Mathematics Honor Society is sponsoring a Christmas toy and gift drive 
to benefit the LSU Health Sciences Center Pediatric Unit. All donations will be given to children in the hospital 
unit during the Christmas season. Donations of new unwrapped items can be dropped in room 450B of Kyser 

Hall (the math tutoring lab). 

Fl Visa - international students 

This is a friendly reminder for all international students, who have an Fl Student VISA and are planning to leave 
the US during the break. Please be sure that your form 1-20 has been endorsed by an authorized personnel in the 

Office of Admissions before we close on Dec. 1 6 at noon. 

Tutors needed during 2012 spring semester 

The NSU Athletic Department has been very fortunate to receive grant money from the NCAA each summer to 
fund an in-house tutoring program. We are currently seeking out those who would be interested in working for 
athletics tutoring during the spring 2012 semester. Applicants must be of sophomore status without a current 
on-campus job. Please contact the tutor coordinator. Rachelle Menard, at menardr@nsula.edu to request an ap- 
plication. 

Submit to Argus before end of semester 

Don't forget to submit your creative work to Argus before you leave for the semester. Enter your poetry, fiction, 
creative nonfiction, art and photography for a chance to win cash prizes and get published in an award-winning 
magazine. The deadline is Dec. 9. Send your creative writing and any questions to argus@nsula.edu. 



Index 



2 Life 

5 Opinions 

6 Sports 



Wednesday 

74°/63° 



Thursday 

74743° 



Friday 

71747° 



Saturday 

79759° 



Sunday 

84759° 



Monday 

82755° 



Tuesday 

80756° 





Life 



Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

ywagonerOO 1 @student.nsula.edu 
December 7,2011 



Gala continues holiday tradition 

Students filled with Christmas spirit 



Jared Roberts 

Sauce Reporter 

TV booming voice comes 
from the balcony above 
as the curtains open center stage 
revealing a two-story tall choir that 
starts off a Natchitoches and NSU 
tradition NSU: Christmas Gala. 

Gala was originally in- 
spired by the Radio City Music Hall 
shows in New York City. Director 
Dr. Christopher Gilliam, unable to 
use the copyrighted material, used 
the shows as an inspiration to make 
his own piece for this year's perfor- 
mance, titled "We Celebrate Christ- 
mas," which Gala goers will remem- 
ber as both the finale and the overall 
theme of the event. 

Gilliam began working on 
the 2 1 st annual Gala in March when 
he began writing his original work 
and deciding which number would 
make it into the show. 

"I wanted to pen a text that 
communicated as many facets of the 
'global holiday spirit' that I could," 
Gilliam said. "The phrase 'We Cel- 
ebrate Christmas,' popped into my 
head and it stuck." 

Eventually the opening act, 
"We Celebrate Christmas," became 



the finale. The Gala had nine return- 
ing acts and four new performances. 

About 5.000 children and 
4,000 adults viewed the four shows 
last week. Gilliam complimented 
the hard w ork of the cast and crew 
which consisted of more than 300 
cast members, not including techni- 
cal crew and faculty. 

The Gala cast practiced 
since October in addition to four 
rehearsals. In the days before the 
first performance, students worked a 
minimum of 20 hours in addition to 
preparing for finals. 

"I wish everyone could un- 
derstand what a sacrifice Gala is for 
our students and faculty," Gilliam 
said. 

Ariana Michel, assistant stage man- 
ager, w orked more than 50 hours on 
Gala. 

"As far as stress goes, this year in 
particular has been pretty stressful. . . 
as expected when merging two de- 
partments and wrangling about 300 
people into one space," she said. 

"The arts change people, 
moves the soul," Gilliam said. "If 
you can make someone laugh or cry, 
well the arts are very powerful. It's a 
responsibility." 




Photo by NSU News Bureau 

The Gala featured performances by the NSU Choirs, the NSU Department of Theatre and Dance and the Natchitoches-Northwestern 
Orchestra. The Out on a Limb Improv Troupe, Northwestern State Jazz Orchestra, NSU Rockettes, NSU Percussion Ensemble, NSU 
students from the Department of Fine and Graphic Arts also performed. 



Symphony 
Blast and 



Creativity at Christmas: Health Services ornament competition 



Yevette Wagoner 

Life Editor 

Students used their creative side 
last week to create Christmas 
ornaments for NSU Health 
Services' ornament competi- 
tion. 

The contest was open to all 
current NSU students, and they 
were given the option to choose 
five items from the Health Servic- 
es Center to create a homemade 
Christmas ornament. 

The items included latex gloves, 
tongue depressors, pill bottles, 
otosccope covers, cotton balls, 
medicine cups and other medical 
items. The ornament was judged on 
originality, creativity, appearance 
and quality. 

The first places prizes were a 
$50 gift certificate to Antoon's 
Restaurant and an original piece 
of artwork by one of the nurses, 
Ashley Jordan. 

The second place prize was a 
purple NSU hoodie. 

The third place prize was a 
NSU throw blanket and NSU 
cups and pens. 




Photo by Ashley Jordan 

Winners from left to right hold their homemade Christmas ornaments: First place, Taylor Anderson; 
Second place, Jessica Tate; Third place, Kelsie Neighbors. 



Current Sauce announces 
first 'Honor the Scholar' 
winner: Drew Ferguson 

a private business in the future. 
Ferguson also plans to acquire a 
Certified Public Accountant cer- 
tificate. 

"I'm dedicated to studying and 
keeping my grades up because I 
know how much my gpa will af- 
fect the type of job I am able to 
receive when I get out of college," 
Ferguson said. 

She has offered her services as a 
math tutor, particularly in college 
algebra. 

"I would love to help anyone 
who didn't fully understand their 
school work," Ferguson added. 

Ferguson is a member of Phi 
Mu Fraternity and is also the 
newly elected College Panhel- 
lenic Council senior delegate. 

"I work hard at whatever is 
given to me, and I know it will 
not be hard to be very involved 
in my sorority as well as mantain 
my academic success," Ferguson 
said. 




Drew Ferguson 

Yevette Wagoner 

Life Editor 

Drew Ferguson is a sopho- 
more double majoring in ac- 
counting and business. 
She has obtained an overall 4.0 
gpa. Ferguson has attended a sem- 
inar on Louisiana Entrepreneur- 
ship about "Developing Small 
Business" and plans on owning 



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Comics 



thecurrentsauce@gniail.com 
December 7, 2011 




Amber Waves 



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Opinions 



thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
December 7, 2011 



Warning: Plagiarism serious offense 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Co-Editor 



F 



rom 

December 
7* to 
December 14'\ the 
students of Northwestern State will 
be taking finals. This can cause a 
lot of stress for college students. 
However, that is no reason to forget 
to study and concentrate on school. 

Although slacking off can seem 
like a good idea, it eventually leads 
to more stress. Something some 
students may consider is copying 
the work of others as an easy way 
out. 

Copying another individual's 
work, in any form, and claiming it 
as your own is plagiarism. Although 



"7b be honest, I feel quite betrayed when it 
[plagiarism] happens even though I know 
the student is simply thinking of his/her own 
grade. But I feel as if I give my students every 
opportunity to learn and to improve, and I 
can 't understand why someone even takes a 
class ifs/he doesn t intend to do the work. " 

- Dr. Shirley Stave, professor of English 



"I think intentional plagiarism is a product of 
pure laziness: there s no reason to plagiarize 
if you know your subject. I personally would 
have no tolerance for plagiarism if I were 
a teacher. Plagiarism is, in my opinion, 
detrimental to all those involved, and the 
risks associated with plagiarizing definitely 
outweigh the possible benefits. " 

- Kristen Hadley, sophomore in Liberal Arts 



some cases of plagiarism are more 
extreme than others, even forgetting 
the quotation marks around a direct 
quote in a paper can be considered 
plagiarism. 

Some students may think that a 
"small" case of plagiarism will not 
be caught, or if it is, that it will not 
be judged as harshly. This is a silly 
idea. 



It is hard for me to believe that 
some students may not know what 
the term plagiarism means, but for 
those students who do not know that 
copy and pasting information into 
your own paper is stealing - it is 
time for you to learn. 

Faculty members at NSU have 
access to the program "Tumitin" 
which can be used to detect even 



the smallest act of plagiarism. 
Despite this, it seems that students 
still think plagiarism is a viable 
option in regards to term papers or 
other assignments. 

Although it may not seem like 
a big deal as you copy and paste 
a line or two of text - even if you 
just forget to add the citation - it 
can have disastrous results on your 



academic career. 

From a failing grade in your 
class to expulsion from the 
university itself, plagiarism in an 
academic community is not looked 
upon lightly. The act of plagiarism 
betrays a lazy work ethic that many 
teachers, and even employers, will 
frown upon later in life. 

So if you are thinking about 
plagiarizing, remember that you are 
not in high school anymore. There 
is no principal's office, and you will 
not receive a slap on the wrist. The 
effects of the decisions you make 
while attending this university will 
stay with you for a lifetime. 



For more information regarding 
what plagiarism entails please go 
to: www.plagiarism.org 



Writers 
needed! 

Our newspaper 
needs articles 
written by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join 
our team! 

Meetings every 
Monday at 6 p.m. 

We hope to hear 
from you! 

- Current Sauce 
staff 



Rants: It's that time of year again 



Tom H. Lawler 

Opinions Columnist 




s it is 

December, 
it is 

also Christmas 
Festival time in 
Natchitoches. It 
is that magical time of year when 
the parish finally sees a decent 
return on its investments of the 
previous eleven months. 

With all of the positive 
and cheery hype exclaiming 
the wonders of 'The Paris of 
Northern Louisiana', I thought I 
may provide a different opinion. 
It is an opinion not entirely 
my own as I have heard others 



express similar sentiments. 

A walk down Front St. last 
night (around nine in the evening) 
revealed that in front of every 
store and restaurant was a crowd. 
Truly, people come from far 
and wide to enjoy the Christmas 
Festival. In other words, people 
come from all over to look at... 
lights? 

Bias alert: I hate Christmas 
lights. To be fair though, 1 do not 
loathe Christmas but only a few 
certain aspects like lights, general 
cheerfulness and 'seasonal 
commercials' on TV. Humbug. 

I have no idea how much 
the lights cost Natchitoches, and 
I almost do not want to know. 
What I am aware of though, is 
that any small or medium-sized 



town could throw up lights for 
Christmas. In fact, most do. 

True, Natchitoches is a special 
place. However the Christmas 
Festival is not a special part of 
it. Perhaps though, it is integral 
in stimulating the local economy 
and giving us residents something 
to talk or gripe about. 

My other complaint with 
the lights is the energy use. Bias 
alert: 1 enjoy outdoor activities 
and plan on receiving a master's 
degree in environmental studies. 
Dear reader, you may insert any 
green movement argument about 
energy use here and it would 
probably fit. 

. . As for the fireworks portion 
of the annual display, I approve. 
They are only for one night (or 



two?) and actually much more 
thrilling than lights. 

The other complaint is the 
crowds. One reason why 1 chose 
to study in Natchitoches was its 
relative quietness compared to 
other cities in Louisiana (since 
1 am from Baton Rouge). The 
crowds ruin all of that. 

Every year my apartment's 
parking lot fills up with other 
states' license plates. In past 
years, I have had to pay to park at 
my own home. 

Another thing about those 
crowds is that while they do 
spend good money here, we 
sacrifice peace, cheaper prices 
at places of commerce, and less 
traffic on the city's roads. If that 
is the price to keep the city afloat 



financially, so be it. We will 
begrudgingly pay the cost. 

So if you are from out of town 
and reading this: take a gander 
at our lights and streets of brick. 
You may have never seen such 
things before so enjoy yourself 
(spend money, spend money, 
spend money). 

As for you, dear reader, I hope 
this Christmas Festival passes 
with no annoyances to you. Me, 
I am looking forward to January. 
Yet, if for nothing else, it is an 
interesting something to have in 
the background for a while. 

To my fans and critics alike: 
again. Humbug. See you next 
semester. 



by Japheth Light 

There are 1 3 black hexagons in the 

puzzle. Place the numbers 1 - 6 
around each of them. No number can 

be repeated in any partial hexagon 
shape along the border of the puzzle. 




DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: 



♦ Easy ♦♦Medium ♦♦♦Difficult 

© 201 1 King Features Synd., !nc 




CryptoQuote 

AX YD L B A AX R 
is LONQFELLOW 

One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used 
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters, 
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words are all 
hints. Each week the code letters are different. 

CYA FJOI LQ QWSSLBC 
CYWC GAWSSN IJPCBGTP 
KLPC HALHSA JP EYWC 
ZACP IGLHHAI LB C LQ 
CYAJG HWNDYADFP. - 
PLBGDA LTPDBGA 

11 King Features Synd., Inc. 



merry 



christ 



mas 



Sunday • Dec. 25 




happy 
hanuiftah 



) 2011 by King Fealures Syndicate. Inc. 
World rights -eserved. 



> 201 1 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. 
World rights reserved. 




Begins Tuesday, Dec. 20 



The 

CurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Taylor Graves 
News Editor 

Yevette Wagoner 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Life Co-Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Kyla Winey 
Freshman Scholar 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



Tips for Healthier Holiday Eating 

- Drink more water throughout meals to help feel fuller, quicker. 

- Be careful with portions (one-half plate should be fruits and vegetables, one- 
fourth proteins and one-fourth grains.) 

- Take a long walk after a meal; it is good for digestion and will make you feel better. 

- Cook healthy versions of traditional recipes by using resources such as 
eatbetteramerica.com and mypyramid.gov. 

- Use whole grains instead of white for making bread, stuffing and pasta. 

- Substitute applesauce for oil when making baked goods such as cookies and 
cakes. 

- Use herbs instead of salt to add flavor to food. 

- Adults should exercise 30 minutes a day, which can be divided into 10-minute 
segments if necessary. 

- Use local produce whenever possible. It tends to maintain its nutrients longer 
than produce that has traveled long distances. 

- from King Features Weekly Service 



Mega Maze 



C 20 II King FmUH Synd he 





The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
walkerj@nsula.edu 
December 7, 2011 



Poor 
shooting 
dooms Lady 
Demons in 
67-41 loss to 
SMU 

Courtesy of Sports Info: 

The frigid temperatures outside 
Southern Methodist's Moody 
Coliseum followed the North- 
western State Lady Demon basket- 
ball team into the arena as NSU shot 
a season-low 23. 1 percent ( 1 5 of 65) 
from the floor in a 67-41 loss to the 
Mustangs on Monday night. 

The shooting percentage was 
the lowest since making just 21.5 
percent from the floor at Texas-Ar- 
lington in February of 2006 and the 

41 points was the lowest point total 
since scoring 39 points in a loss to 
Louisiana-Monroe in December 
2006. 

The loss dropped the Lady De- 
mons to 2-5 on the season while 
SMU snapped a three-game losing 
streak with the win and improved to 
5-4 on the year. 

Jordi James led NSU with 11 
points and Ronikka Drake added 10 
points as NSU scored just six points 
in the first 14 minutes of the second 
half after trailing 39-26 at the half. 

"When you shoot 17 percent in 
the half, it's hard to win games," said 
head coach Jennifer Graf. "We had 
a lot of good looks at the basket, in- 
cluding a lot of open layups, but we 
couldn't get the ball in the basket. 

"There were a lot of positives in 
the game," said Graf. "They (SMU) 
scored 1 7 points in the first four min- 
utes of the game and then finished 
w ith 67. 1 thought we did a good job 
defensively but it comes down to not 
making our shots." 

One of the positives was the 46- 

42 advantage the Lady Demons held 
in the rebounding margin. NSU also 
forced 1 8 turnovers but only scored 
nine points off those miscues. 

SMU had just one player score in 
double figures with Samant Mahn- 
esmith leading the way with 15 
points. 

The Mustangs forced the Lady 
Demons into 26 turnovers and 
scored 24 points oil those errors. 

The Mustangs knocked down 25 
of 60 from the field for 41.7 percent 
and hit 4 of 1 1 for 36 percent from 
3-point range. 

"We'll turn the page on this one 
and keep working hard to get better," 
said Graf. "It'll be great to get back 
home." 

The Lady Demons trailed 39-26 
at the half but came on strong in the 
last 3:45 of the frame after hitting 3 
of 5 from the field, including both 
shots from 3-point range. 

James knocked down a 3-pointer 
at the buzzer to give the Lady De- 
mons a little momentum heading 
into the break. 

NSU returns to action on Satur- 
day when it hosts Wiley College at 2 
p.m. in Prather Coliseum. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Lady Demons finished the season with an overall record of 10-6 and conference record of 6-10. The team made the SLC tourney. 

Young Lady Demons turn in successful 2011 season 

Robbie Klienmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 



Fielding a roster of nine fresh- 
man, two sophomores and a 
junior, the Northwestern State 
volleyball team reached the South- 
land Conference Tournament for 
the first time in three years, and im- 
proved its conference win total by 
two matches from 20 10. 

The Lady Demons (10-20, 6-10) 
showed the SLC Tournament stage 
wasn't too big, as they competed 
well against #1 seed Texas State, 
taking a set off the eventual tourna- 
ment champions. 

As team defense has been the 
backbone of the team, NSU proved 
it once again by holding the Bobcats 
57 points below their season average 
in hitting percentage and below that 
of any other team Texas State faced 
in the tournament. 

"This year was a great step in 
the rebuilding process for our pro- 
gram. Having to mesh together nine 
new faces with three returners was a 
challenge in itself - not to mention 



getting nine freshmen acclimated to 
the college game, our training and 
systems of play, and the rigors of be- 
ing a student-athlete at this level," 
co-head coach Hugh Hernesman. "It 
wasn't an easy process, but it was 
a great learning experience for our 
athletes." 

NSU was on the brink of elimina- 
tion heading into the final weekend 
of the season, needing to win its fi- 
nal two matches in order to qualify 
for the conference tournament. The 
Lady Demons then stepped up to the 
challenge and took down SLU and 
Nicholls State, winning six of their 
final seven sets and earning a trip to 
the SLC Tournament. 

Conway, Ark., hosted not only the 
SLC Tournament, but also the Lady 
Demon's historic trip on Sept. 15, 
when they pulled oft" their biggest 
win of the season. Led by Stacey 
DiFrancesco's 21 kills and .241% 
attack percentage, the victory over 
Central Arkansas made national 
news, as it ended the Sugar Bear's 
31 -match home winning streak, sec- 
ond longest in the country. Jessica 
Guttierrez came in to finish it off by 



serving an ace on match point. 

The Lady Demons also hoisted a 
streak of their own, taking three in a 
row against SLC opponents starting 
Sept. 29. The spurt was the longest 
the program had recorded since the 
2008 season. 

"Our pre-conference portion of 
the schedule had us better prepared 
for conference play this year com- 
pared to last year. We made a con- 
certed effort to schedule teams with 
a RPI of 50-125, and played eight of 
our 1 2 matches against teams in that 
range. 

"That helped raise our program's 
level of play, and put us in enough 
challenging situations that we were 
ready for the top teams in our con- 
ference," Hernesman said. 

NSU posted an impressive 7-1 
record against Louisiana foes this 
season, including victories over 
UL-Lafayette, Louisiana Tech, Mc- 
Neese State, Southeastern Louisiana 
(twice) and Nicholls State (twice). 
Quick starts often favored Lady De- 
mons in those matches, as they tal- 
lied a 19-11 record in the opening 
frame of matches on the year. 



DiFrancesco earned Freshman of 
the Year and Second-team All-Con- 
ference after leading the SLC with 
14 double-doubles in 16 matches. 

She broke the school record for at- 
tacks in a season (1390), and placed 
second in the record books in total 
kills (424). DiFrancesco finished the 
season second in the SLC in kills, 
averaging 3.79 per set on the season 
and 4. 1 6 per set in conference play. 

Libero Keelie Arneson set the 
NSU single-season record for digs, 
scooping up 539, surpassing Ra- 
chel Ford's mark of 528 set in 2006. 
Arneson also earned Southern Mis- 
sissippi Invitational All-Tournament 
honors at the beginning of the year, 
and finished sixth in the SLC in digs 
after reaching double-digits in 29 of 
30 matches. 

The Lady Demons finished eighth 
in the SLC, two spots ahead of where 
the preseason polls predicted them. 
"We now look forward to getting 
better and stronger this spring and 
adding a very talented 2012 recruit- 
ing class to the mix next August," 
Hernesman said. 



Lady Demon Softball adds elite pitching for 2012 



Robbie Klienmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Head Coach Donald Pickett 
announced the addition of 
two elite Northwestern State 
softball players for the 2012 
season, as pitchers Baylee Gray and 
Kaylee Guidry make up the incom- 
ing class. 

"We are really excited about 
adding these two pitchers to our 
program," Pickett said. "They will 
have the opportunity to have an 
impact for us immediately." 

Gray, a right-handed pitcher 
from Mansfield, Texas, led Man- 
sfield HS to a 26-7 record, 7-2 



playoff record and a 1 .06 ERA. She 
was a big contributor for teams that 
earned Bi-District champions (three 
times). District Champions, Area 
Champions, Semi-final and Quar- 
terfinal Champions and Regional 
Finalists 

Gray's accolades also include 
two-time First Team All-District, 
District MVP, First Team All-Area, 
All-Area Super Team, All-Area 
Second-team Dallas Morning News, 
three-time Academic All-District 
and Academic Honor Roll. 

"Baylee brings a great presence 
to the mound and is a great compet- 
itor," Pickett said. "She has played 
at a high-level and will bring a great 



mentality to our staff." 

Guidry, a right-handed pitcher 
from Walker, La., is coming off 
a 4-0 year at Louisiana College. 
She also hit .338 while starting 23 
games and playing first base. 

Over the summer, Guidry played 
for the Louisiana Chaos and tallied 
a 23-0 pitching record and a 0.49 
ERA. The team ended on a 51 -game 
win streak and won six tourna- 
ments, including three state cham- 
pionships and the NSU 18-U Class 
A National Title. At Walker HS, 
she recorded three perfect games, 
seven no-hitters and a 1 .22 ERA her 
senior year. She led the team to a 
state semi-final appearance and the 



District 5-5A Championship while 
earning four varsity letters. 

Guidry's accolades include First- 
Team All-Parish Pitcher 201 0, All- 
State Honorable Mention 2009 & 
2010, Baton Rouge All-Metro 2009 
& 2010, First-team All-District in 
2009 & 2010, Second-Team All- 
Parish Pitcher 2008 & 2009, Team 
MVP in 2009, and Second Team 
All-District Pitcher Award 2008. 

"Kaylee will bring maturity and 
experience to the circle," Pickett 
said. "She has great command of 
her pitches and can change speeds 
really well." 

The Lady Demons will open the 
season on Feb. 10, 2012, at ULM. 



Jimmie 
Walker 

Editor-in- 
Chief 



Dynomite: 
The BCS 
finally got it 
right: LSU 
and Bama 
set for 
rematch 

I know by reading the headline 
some of you became instantly 
upset. Your first thoughts 
were probably, " there goes another 
imitation sports writer thinking he 
knows about sports." "How in the 
world can he say the BCS is right 
about anything?" 

I'll admit that I am contradicting 
myself a little. I never loved the sys- 
tem and probably complained about 
it just as much as the fans of Okla- 
homa State or any non-Southeastern 
Conference team. I'm just saying 
that for once, the BCS did the right 
thing in selecting Alabama to face 
off in a rematch against LSU. 

The BCS is supposed to put the 
two best teams in a no-holds-barred, 
gridiron competition. It doesn't 
take into account what it suspects 
the final score to be. 

An OKST and LSU game seems 
like it would be more offensively 
stimulating, but that is not the point. 
Let's take LSU out of the picture for 
the moment. 1 wonder how many 
people believe that Oklahoma State 
can beat Alabama? For those of you 
that believe this, I am here to say 
you are wrong. 

I hate to use the old cliche' about 
defense beating the offense, but it 
fits perfectly in this scenario. Now 
add the fact that the Crimson Tide 
is stacked on the offensive end as 
well. It's not that hard to believe 
that Trent Richardson would walk 
all over the defense of the Cow- 
boys. Just look at what he did to 
LSU. 

The argument about needing 
to win your conference in order to 
play for a national title needs to be 
thrown out of the w indow. OKST 
has nobody to blame but them- 
selves. 

There is no possible way you 
can form an intellectual thought that 
can justify losing to an unranked 
Iowa State and convince anyone 
that OKST deserves to play in the 
Allstate BCS Championship. 

We know the BCS is not perfect, 
but let's face it, the picture is set. 

The Crimson Tide-LSU grudge 
match is happening and it will 
determine who is king of NCAA 
football for the 201 1 season. 




Jimmy Mitchell resigns as soccer head coach Just Like Cats 8c Dogs t> H Dave t. Phfrps 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Jimmy Mitchell received a plaque commemorating him for his 200th 
career win. 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Lady Demon soccer head coach 
Jimmy Mitchell has resigned 
after leading the team for 13 
seasons. 
Mitchell finished with an NSU 
record of 1 3 1 - 1 1 2-20. He won 
a Southland Conference regular- 
season championship, three SLC 
tournament-titles and helped his 
team appear three times in the 
NCAA tournament. 

"Jimmy Mitchell has been the 
face of the Northwestern State wom- 
en's soccer program for the majority 
of its existence and is appreciated 
beyond words for his immeasur- 
able contributions to the success and 
overall well-being of the program," 
NSU Director of Athletics Greg 
Burke said. "I am certain that I am 
joined by everyone associated with 
the NSU athletic program in wishing 
him the best in his future endeav- 
ors. 



Shortly after Mitchell arrived, he 
began to show that his hire was a 
good choice. A 1 5-8 season led to 
the program's first league title in 
2000. More hardware was gained 
during the 2002 season. Mitchell 
won another conference tournament 
championship. He coached his way 
to a third title in 2005 as the Lady 
Demons became the first Louisiana 
team to make three NCAA tourna- 
ment appearances. 

"I have enjoyed spending 1 3 
years of my life in Natchitoches and 
at Northwestern State." Mitchell 
said. "I came to NSU thinking I 
would be here a few years and then 
move on to another university, but 
once we became entrenched in the 
community, my family fell in love 
with the people and the culture of 
the area. Because of this I have 
turned down several chances to take 
other jobs to stay at NSU. I am glad 
that we made the decision to move 
here 1 3 years ago and experience 
such a unique and special place." 



AHH GEEZ, YOU KNOW YOUR TEAM IS HAVTN^ 
AN AWFUL SEASON WHEN YOU ACTUALLY 
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318.357.0054 • Fax: 318.357.0063 
810 KEYSER AVE. ♦ NATCHITOCHES, LA 





Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, January 18, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 97: Issue 13 



Leesville campus upgrades through Coke Rewards 



Sarah Hale 

Staff Reporter 

Leesville Campus Library 
Manager, Anna MacDon- 
ald, is incredibly pleased 
with the changes taking place this 
semester in the Leesville Student 
Library. Through the Coke Rewards 
program the library has been almost 
completely remodeled. With a total 
of three new student centers, a new 
paint job, as well as several newly 
purchased best selling novels, the li- 
brary has begun to increase in popu- 
larity among the Leesville students. 

During a recent survey North- 
western students suggested that the 
library add leisure books to its col- 
lection. In response to the requests 
The Leesville Campus Library cre- 
ated a new section entirely dedicat- 
ed to the latest best selling novels. 
Featuring novels by Christine Fee- 
han. Colleen Houck and Suzzanne 
Collins as well as a collection of 
graphic novels by Robert Kirkman, 
the best-seller section is steadily be- 
coming a student hotspot. 

"Through the (Coke Rewards) 
program we have earned enough 
Coke points to acquire 12 popu- 
lar magazines. This has saved the 
library money and allowed them 
to put it towards other purchases," 
MacDonald said. 

Coke Rewards is a program de- 



signed to help schools buy a variety 
of educational tools through the use 
of a point system. Points are accu- 
mulated by submitting codes, found 
on the inside of Coke product bottle 
caps, to an online Coke Rewards ac- 
count. Each coke product is worth 
a certain number of points. Once 
enough points are accumulated they 
can be redeemed for a prize which 
is chosen by the participating school. 

Other additions to the library 
include a group study area-com- 
plete with a television, DVD and 
VHS players and internet access- a 
paperback book section and a KIC 
(Knowledge Information Center) 
scanner. 

MacDonald is especially thrilled 
by the new scanner and states, "Now 
that we've gotten it up and running 
the scanner, will be available to all 
students. Students can scan in color 
photos and save them to a USB drive 
instead of printing them off. That 
way they don't get charged for us- 
ing the printer." The touch screen 
panel makes the KIC different from 
the other scanners, allowing students 
to choose and edit images with the 
touch of a button. The scanner fea- 
tures three separate USB ports, al- 
lowing students to save directly to 
their thumb drives. 

With all of the new additions to 
the library, student life at Leesville 
campus is bound to become much 
more enjoyable this semester. 



SAB plans 
for fun-filled 
spring 



Alexis Reilford 

Staff Reporter 

After a 3-week holiday break 
students and faculty return 
to campus eager to start the 
spring 2012 semester. 

To encourage students to leave 
those dark library cubicles, the Stu- 
dent Activities Board will be host- 
ing multiple events this semester. 
"Students can look forward to these 
fun and exciting upcoming events," 
sophomore, SAB representative at 
large Sarah Chan said. 

On January 19 at 7 p.m. located in 
The Alley is the SAB Coffeehouse. 
Students can come sing, dance, show 
their talents, and win various prizes. 
Unsigned artist Scott Porter will per- 
form covers of popular artists' songs 
and free coffee items will be served. 
Other SAB coffeehouses will be 
held on February 23 and March 15. 

The Miss Louisiana Pageant pre- 
liminary will be held on February 
4th at A. A Fredericks Auditorium. 
Ten beautiful NSU ladies will com- 
pete for the title of Miss Northwest- 
ern Lady of the Bracelet, each show- 
casing their own special talents. The 
pageant starts at 7 p.m. 

Students can expect to laugh non- 
stop on February 16 at 7 p.m. An 
NSU Kings of Comedy show will be 
held in the Student Union Ballroom. 



"Three funny, well known comedi- 
ans will be coming in to perform and 
it should be a very fun and humorous 
night," Chan said. 

On March 6, also held in the Stu- 
dent Union Ballroom is "Are you 
smarter than a freshman?" Much 
like the popular game show "Are 
you smarter than a 5th grader?" with 
a few slight tw ists. 

Students of all classifications will 
be competing for the top grand prize, 
a new HP Touchsmart 320 computer, 
valued at over S700. 

"I encourage every student that is 
interested to prep for this event be- 
cause it is going to be intense," Host 
and SAB Freshman Factor Commit- 
tee head Ryan Owens said. Accord- 
ing to Owens students should prep 
by reviewing the basic cirriculum of 
freshman english, math, science and 
history courses. 

The main event of the spring se- 
mester, Spring Fling will be held on 
March 28 from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Join 
SAB at the NSU Tailgating Field as 
they ring in the spring by enjoying 
crawfish, listening to a live band, 
making personalized street signs, 
getting wet on the giant water slide, 
and more. 

All these SAB events are free 
of charge for current NSU students 
with their i.d. and the current semes- 
ter sticker on the back. 




Photo submitted by Anna MacDonald 
Leesville students use the library's new best-seller section for a quiet place to study. 



NSU Police 
Blotter 

Reports from the NSU 
police station from 
Jan 10-16 

fanuary 7 th 

129 p.m. Driver with supsended 
icense, apprehended vehicle 

kmuary 8th 

'1:02 p.m.- Student complaint at 
Columns 

, January 9th 

136 p.m. -Sparks seen at Roy 
Ml 

1:56 p.m. - Electrician sent to 



Roy Hall 
January 1 0th 

7:21 a.m. - Traffic accident at 
Ferguson 

7:25 a.m. - Collision at UP! 

1 0: 00 p.m. - Smoke reported at 
Columns 

10:14 p.m. - Natchitoches Fire De- 
partment arrives at Columns 

11:50 p.m. - Items reported missing 
from UP2 

January 11th 

11:54 p.m. Traffic stop/ loud music 
January 13th 

8:29 Fire found left unattended 



January 1 4th 

1 0:36 am. - Police break up large 
group at UP1 

4:48 p.m. - Dorm at Columns had 
door kicked in 

10:20 p.m. - Group of students re- 
main at Student Union when asked 
to leave 

10:22 p.m. - Arrive at Student 
Union, building is clear 

January 15th 

1:42 p.m. - Bike stolen 

4:48 p.m. - Break-in at Columns 



News 
of the 
Week 



Girl Scouts Boycott own 
Cookies over Transgender 
Scout: A group of Girl Scouts 
calling themselves Honest Girl 
Scouts are boycotting Girl 
Scout cookies in response to 
a Colorado troop allowing a 
7 year-old transgender child 
to join. Surrounding LGBT 
members respond by purchas- 
ing cookies en masse. 

Miss Wisconsin becomes 
new Miss America: In Las 

Vegas on Saturday night, Miss 
Wisconsin, 23 year-old Laura 
Kaeppeler became the new 
Miss America. She sang opera 
and narrowly beat runner-up 
Miss Oklahoma. 

Golden Globes Awards: 
Best Picture-Drama: "The 
Descendants", Best Actor- 
Drama: George Clooney, 
"The Descendants," Best Ac- 
tress-Drama: Meryl Streep, 
"The Iron Lady", Best Pic- 
ture-Musical or Comedy: 
"The Artist", Best Animated 
Feature: "The Adventures of 
Tintin", Best Director: Martin 
Scorcese, "Hugo." 

Two year-old Virginian boy 
found safe: Abducted by bur- 
glars during a break-in and 
double homocide, police found 
the child, unharmed, in a ve- 
hicle that was previously seen 
outside the crime scene. 

Wikipedia to shut down 
Wednesday: In protest of 
SOPA (the Stop Online Piracy 
Act in congress) founder Jim- 
my Wales intends to shutdown 
Wikipedia for a few hours on 
Wednesday along with other 
websites in an "internet black- 
out". 



NSU alum earns award 



Courtesy of News Bureau: 

Dr. Kathleen R. Stevens, a 
Northwestern State Univer- 
sity alumna and a profes- 
sor in the School of Nursing at the 
University of Texas Health Science 
Center in San Antonio, received the 
Episteme Award, one of nursing's 
most prestigious research honors. 
Stevens received the honor during 
Sigma Theta Tau International's 
41st biennial convention. STTI is 
the international honor society of 
nursing. 

In connection with being named 
an Episteme Laureate, Stevens w ill 
be inducted into the International 
Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame in 
July 2012 at the society's 23rd In- 
ternational Nursing Research Con- 
gress in Australia. 

The Baxter International Foun- 
dation's Episteme Award acknowl- 
edges a major breakthrough in the 
development of nursing knowledge 



that has resulted in a significant and 
recognizable benefit to the pub- 
lic. Episteme is the Greek word for 
knowledge. 

Stevens, Ed.D., RN, ANEF, FAAN, 
earned her undergraduate nursing 
degree with honors at Northwestern 
State in 1969 and was president of 
the Student Nurses Association. She 
earned a master's degree in mater- 
nal child health at Texas Woman's 
University and doctor of education 
in education administration/health 
research at the University of Hous- 
ton/Baylor College. She completed 
post-doctoral work in informatics at 
the University of Utah. 

"My achievements in my profes- 
sion definitely were fed by good 
roots developed at Northwestern 
State College of Nursing," Stevens 
said. "I am proud to be a Northwest- 
ern State nurse." 

She is director of the Academic 
Center for Evidence-Based Practice 
(ACE), a School of Nursing center 



of excellence that she founded in 
2000. Through ACE, Stevens im- 
proves patient care by her efforts to 
build a workforce and work environ- 
ments that move research quickly 
into high-quality care. 

"Bridging scientific results to bed- 
side care involves hardwiring new 
knowledge into care delivery, stimu- 
lating clinicians to innovate, evalu- 
ate and adopt changes, and embrac- 
ing patient and family preferences. 
In short, the goal is to find what re- 
search has shown to work best and 
put it into play for better outcomes," 
Stevens said. 

To accomplish this, Stevens de- 
veloped theories of evidence-based 
practice, established national con- 
sensus on new skills needed in clini- 
cal care and initiated a series of pro- 
fessional development conferences 
for clinicians, scientists and hospital 
leaders. The conferences include 
the Summer Institute on Evidence- 
Based Practice, the Educators Evi- 



dence-Based Practice Workshop and 
the Improvement Science Summit. 
The Summer Institute, launched 
in 2002, celebrated its 10th annual 
program in July. Over the past de- 
cade, more than 5.000 participants 
have attended the institute, bringing 
change to hundreds of institutions. 

Additionally, Stevens developed 
the Improvement Science Research 
Network (ISRN). a national online 
research laboratory that enables 
academic and practice associates 
to conduct improvement research, 
accelerating the transformation of 
health care into safe and reliable sys- 
tems. "The bridge between scientists 
and clinical serv ice represents an on- 
going commitment to excellence in 
health care and the advancement of 
nursing science," she explained. 



For rest of press release: 
check out NSU news bureau 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

61738° 



Thursday 

71755° 



Friday 

76°/6A° 



Saturday 

68754° 



Sunday 

76761° 



Monday 

79754° 



Tuesday 

75746° 




i 





Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
January 18, 2012 



Who will be the next Lady of the Bracelet? 



Brittany Jeanice 

Sauce Reporter 

The Student Activities Board 
will be hosting the Miss 
Northwestern Lady of the 
Bracelet Scholarship Pag- 
eant, Feb 4, 2012 at A. A. Fredrick's 
Auditorium from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
The Lady of the Bracelet Pageant 
has gained state recognition for 
production, scholarship and quality 
contestants. 

The 10 contestants are as follows: 

• Contestant number one is Rikia 
Ancar, a freshman science 
major from New Orleans, Loui- 
siana. She is in the Louisiana 
Scholar's College and plans 

to be a clinical psychologist 
after she graduates 
in 2015. Rikia has 
chosen the platform 
"Taking up the 
Pink: Breast Cancer 
Awareness." 

• Contestant number 

two is Falon Jackson, a junior 
nursing major from Mansura, 
Louisiana. Jackson is a mem- 
ber of the NSU Demon Dazzler 
Danceline. She will be per- 
forming a lyrical dance to the 
number "Come Down to Me." 
Choosing a platform of "St. 
Jude's Children Hospital", she 
wishes to become a registered 
nurse and help children. 

• Contestant number three is 
Tori Thompson, a freshman 
biology major from Texas. 
Thompson has chosen to focus 
her platform on volunteering, 
emphasizing the importance of 
helping one another. She is a 
member of Phi Mu Fraternity 




and also a freshman connector. 
Contestant number four is 
Amber Jackson from Leesville, 
Louisiana. Jackson has cho- 
sen to focus her platform on 
Children's Miracle Network, 
the philanthropy of the Miss 
America Pageant system. She 
plans on receiving her bach- 
elor's in secondary math educa- 
tion and would like to teach 
high school math. 
Contestant number five is 
K*ellie Lewis, a senior nurs- 
ing major from Church Point, 
Louisiana. She will be sing- 
ing "Hero" by Mariah Carey. 
Lewis will graduate from NSU 
within the next two years and 
wishes to achieve a physician's 
assistant degree from Louisiana 
State University in the future. 
Contestant number six 

is Emily Daniels, a 
freshman nursing 
major from Kent- 
wood, Louisiana. 
She is member of the 
NSU Demon Daz- 
zler Danceline, and is 
performing a jazz dance. She 
plans on earning a master's of 
nursing with a specialization in 
nuclear medicine. 
Contestant number seven 
is Christine Davis, a senior 
HMT major from Ponchatoula, 
Louisiana Davis will be playing 
the cello to "Tarantella". She 
will graduate next year with 
a concentration in family and 
consumer science and plans 
to receive a master's in social 
work. 

Contestant number eight is Har- 
lie Dominique from Houma, 
Louisiana. Dominique is in the 
Louisiana Scholar's College 
and a pre-med major. She will 





Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Ruth Fruge pictured center was last year's Lady of the Bracelet. She will 
pass on the bracelet and title to a new winner this year. 

graduate in spring 20 1 5 and 



plans on obtaining her master's 
in orthopedics She holds the 
platform of "Adoption: Saving 
Children from Child Abuse." 
Contestant number nine is 
Breyona Jones, a freshman 
biology major and alum from 
Washington Marion High 
School in Lake Charles, Loui- 
siana. Jones will be performing 
a vocal talent. With her two 
younger sisters as influence, 
she has chosen her platform fo- 
cus as "Continuing Education." 
Contestant number 1 is Logan 
Wallace, a junior health and 
exercise major from Columbia. 
Louisiana. Wallace is a member 
of Phi Mu Fraternity and her 
platform is "H.EA.R.T." She 1 1 
plans to obtain a doctorate in 

physical therapy. 




Submitted Photo 

Members of Theta Chi Fraternity are looking to add new members during this spring's recruitment 
period. 

NSU Greek recruitment 
springs back into action 



Membrie Gibbons 

Staff Reporter 

It's that time of year again, as 
the chaos of classes begins, and 
the Northwestern State campus 
comes to life, talk of spring re- 
cruitment starts to buzz. Some may 
ask, what is spring recruitment? 

Spring recruitment is when the 
sororities and fraternities on campus 
that belong to either the PanHellen- 
ic or Inter-fraternity councils seek 
to expand their numbers. 

Spring recruitment started Mon- 
day, Jan 9 and will last for the next 
six to eight weeks. 

Jackson McNeal, a senior, 
pre-physical therapy major and the 
assistant recruitment chair for Theta 
Chi fraternity, explained the recruit- 
ment process for both the spring and 
fall semesters. 

"During the spring semester, 
both sororities and fraternities 
conduct recruitment very loosely 
compared to the fall semester. Dur- 



ing the spring semester, fraternities 
and sororities present information- 
als and open houses for the students 
to attend freely. 

"During the fall semester re- 
cruitment, things are conducted in a 
formal manner. Students who are in- 
terested in joining one of the many 
fraternities or sororities on campus 
are required to visit a certain num- 
ber of houses during the fall and a 
mutual selection process occurs," 
McNeal added. 

McNeal explained that in the 
spring, the process is far less struc- 
tured, with sororities and fraternities 
handing out offers of membership 
or 'bids' early, without attendance 
to recruitment events. 

The Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority 
handed out a number of early bids 
the first day of classes for the spring 
semester, with Phi Mu following 
closely behind; they handed out 
bids last Wednesday, 

Aside from the differences 
between spring and fall recruitment, 
there are also differences in how the 



fraternities and sororities conduct 
their recruitments individually. 

Natalie Laurence, the director 
NSUof Greek life said, "the sorori- 
ties have a 'cap' or 'campus total" 
on how many members they can 
have. Fraternities on the other hand, 
are not limited in their number of 
members." 

McNeal elaborated on the 
sorority and fraternity recruitment 
guidelines saying, "Sororities tend 
to entertain their visiting potential, 
new members while fraternities 
typically give informational pre- 
sentations. Sororities have stricter 
guidelines than we do, such as bid 
handout dates." 

Any students interested in join- 
ing one of the sororities or frater- 
nities on campus should visit the 
Greek Life Office in Student Union 
Room 214, or speak w ith current 
members of the sororities and fra- 
ternities here at NSU for necessary 
information and dates. 



LOB History 

In the early 1920s, the Pot- 
pourri, Northwestem's year- 
book, sponsored the first beauty 
pageant held on the university 
campus. Contestants were se- 
lected from photographs sub- 
mitted to well-known producers 
and were chosen for their charm 
and beauty. 

In 1958, Miss Kahne Dipola 
became the first Miss Lady of 
the Bracelet and received a gold 
bracelet to wear when she repre- 
sented the university in public. 

Through the efforts of Mr. 
Robert W. Wilson, Sr., the first 
franchise was purchased from 
the Miss Louisiana Pageant in 
1971, enabling Northwestem's 
Lady of the Bracelet to enter the 
state contest. —Student Hand- 
book 



Jacob Labutka 

Fashion Columnist 

When it comes to fashion, 
most college students are 
not purchasing the latest 
Gucci boots, and, more than likely, 
aren't modeling Ralph Lauren. 
Even though most of us could not 
even buy a pair of socks from Saks, 
with a little financial awareness and 
determination, the rest of us can 
attempt to give those Manhattan 
models a run for their money. 

Whether you desire the latest 
couture or something from your 
favorite retailer, the best tactic to 
use to own the item is patience. Of 
course, this virtue is not the easiest 
trait to use at the mall. 

However, it is a universal truth 
that anyone who shops on a budget, 
but has a passion for fashion can 
look fabulous if the cardinal rule 
of shopping is observed: almost all 
items eventually goes on sale. 

This rule is exemplified as one 
strolls through the coffee-shop light- 
ing of Express. Past the $20 three 
percent spandex underwear and 
$200 coats, there is a yellow sign 
named "clearance." This word in- 
cites financial peace in any fashion- 
forward shopper's heart, or at least 
in his or her checking accounts. 

The beautifully fitted $60 dress 
shirts have been reduced to less 
than half the original price while the 
once $150 ruby red, short, sleeve- 
less dress is 30 percent off of the 
clearance price. The choices of 
stores and clothes that are affordable 



A day at the 
mall with 
no patience 
at all 



are endless. One only needs to look 
for the word "clearance." Clearance 
prices on high end brands like Burb- 
erry is likely to still do damage to 
one's account. Luckily, Express is 
a good example of this fashionable 
and money-saving principle. It also 
happens to be my favorite example. 

Unfortunately, there are those 
times in every shopper's life when 
patience is impossible due to the 
fear of an item selling out. This is 
when you have to make your own 
sales with the most powerful of 
magic wands: your cell phone. 

There are several coupon ap- 
plications that you can download 
on your cell phone that immediately 
reduce your shopping costs at a va- 
riety of stores by merely presenting 
your cell phone to the cashier. For 
instance, the application GeoQpons 
is available for free on iPhone 
and Android phones, and unfortu- 
nately, costs $2.99 for Blackberry 
users like myself. Stores like Old 
Navy, Pac Sun and Nine West offer 
coupons for 15-30 percent off your 
total purchase or 25-75 percent off 
specific styles. 

All in all you have three possi- 
bilities, (one or more of which can 
happen at once): remain patient un- 
til the item is cleared by clearance, 
go sale hunting or once in a while, 
splurge on an item and go broke by 
paying the full price. 

For rest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Truth or Dare? 



Truth: 

The Bridge is awesome. 

Dare: 

Go to The Bridge. 




Love the Lord. Love the People. 
Serve the City. Change the Nations. 



Sundays @ 6 PM 

We meet at the Cane Brake Cafe 
on the corner of Front St. and Church St. 

www.livethebridge.com 





Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
January 18, 2012 



Rants: Surfing in class 



Tom H. Lawler 

Opinions columnist 



EH 



i 



just finished 
reading a 
chapter in one 
of my textbooks 
and completing 
the corresponding 
activity. However, I was wearing 
only my unmentionables and I was 
not in Kyser (needless to say). I was 
about 150 miles from Natchitoches 
in the comfort and rent-free 
environment of my home. 

I am not sure of how many 
other universities in Louisiana 
offer courses on the internet, but 
Northwestern State seems to be the 
leader in this educational medium. 
Heck, they have entire degrees 
online! There are three associate 
degrees, ten bachelor degrees 
and 1 5 master degrees (plus one 
specialist degree.) 



I have taken online classes 
before-maybe one a semester 
or over the summer-yet I have 
never taken an entire semester 
online before. So far, I have mixed 
emotions. 

I enjoy the opportunity to be 
wherever I please and to conduct 
my academic affairs. As something 
of a globetrotter, these e-classes 
give me more freedom to travel and 
study at my own discretion. 

This not only allows me 
more time to travel, but to seek 
employment in a town that is larger 
than Natchitoches, where work is 
more abundant. It is liberating; I 
feel like a University of Phoenix 
commercial. 

While the independence is 
exciting, I still bear some nostalgia. 
I cannot hear my hums echoing in 
the Kyser stairwells, walk down 
Rue Cypress on my way home, lose 
my money in the pub or even eat a 



tasty meat pie in Vic's. 

So if you are planning to do as 
I have done, be warned. You will 
sacrifice that 3 1 8 charm for more 
independence. 

That all being said, can the 
virtual classroom replace the 
physical classroom? I say yes. 

I call upon Harold Rheingold, 
who has written extensively about 
virtual communities. 

"Virtual communities are places 
where people meet, and they also 
are tools*' (The Virtual Community, 
Rheingold). 

Consider this quote and then 
the students in the class who 
use discussion boards and other 
functions of Moodle to learn. Since 
we cannot be face to face, the only 
way we interact (on the discussion 
boards) is one of many ways we can 
learn. Neat. 

Also, I do not have to stare at he 
back of your head for sixteen weeks 



now. Also neat. 

However, it has been my 
experience that not all virtual 
classrooms are created equally. My 
advice: take an online class with a 
professor who is physically on the 
main campus. 

Shout out time: Dr. Hare's 
History 3 1 00 course is a fine 
example of this. It is comprimised 
of online quizzes and compressed 
video and audio formats. It is far 
more stimulating than filling out a 
worksheet twice a week and saying 
you "know" physics or something 
to that effect. 

In summation, dear reader, I 
have high hopes that this semester 
will be liberating. Perhaps this will 
be a trend in academia for some 
time. I can only throw more support 
into the experiment of totally 
online semesters. Wish me luck, 
and Godspeed to yourselves this 
semester. 



gKRVEm 

WMMmiMm 




21 



22 




The 

GurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



ACROSS 

1 "Six-pack" 
muscles 

4 Somewhere 
out there 

8 Snare 

12 A Gershwin 
brother 

13 Albacore, 
e.g. 

14 Apiece 

15 Reverie 

17 Tool 
storage 
structure 

18 Bombard 

19 Fore's 
opposite 
Greek 
consonants 
Masseuse's 
workplace 

26 Seraglio 
group 

29 April 
payment 

30 Joan of — 
Enrages 
X rating? 
Fedora 
feature 

34 Conger or 
moray 

35 Crafty one 

36 High-quality 

37 Fluorescent 
trademark 
"Eureka!" 
"— Town" 
Operatic 
voices 

45 Kill bills 

48 9-to-5 

50 A long time 



King Crossword 



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31 
32 
33 



51 Massachu- 
setts motto 
starter 

52 Caesar's 
"I love" 

53 Protuberance 

54 Colonial 
sewer 

55 Kitten's 
comment 

DOWN 



11 



39 
40 
41 



Verdi opera 
Lingerie buys 
Puts into 
words 
Hotel lobby, 
perhaps 
Gas, oil, etc. 
Literary 
collection 
Fast time 



8 Irritable 

9 "Go, team!" 

10 Dogfight 
participant 
Advanced 
deg. 

16 Hamlet's 
countrymen 

20 Transmit, in 
a way 

23 Ganges 
attire 

24 Prudish 

25 Wile E.'s 
supplier 

26 Wasted no 
time 

27 Neighbor- 
hood 

28 Hinge (on) 

29 Cowboy 
nickname 



32 As specified 

33 Impudent 

35 Winter 
ailment 

36 Aspects 

38 Gaggle 
member 

39 Bottomless 
pit 

42 Thailand, 
once 

43 "All -" 

44 Pack cargo 

45 Vehicle with 
sliding doors 

46 Id counter- 
part 

47 Nugent of 
rock 

49 "I'll take that 
as — " 



© 201 1 King Features Synd.. Inc. 



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Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reilford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 



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We need writers! 



Our newspaper 
needs stories writ- 
ten by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every 
Monday at 6 p.m. 

We hope to hear 
from you! 

- Current Sauce 
staff 




Trivid 

t6St byFifi | 
Rodriguez 



1. MUSIC: What was the name of 
the 1 987 song and the movie starring 
Madonna? 

2. WEATHER: What are the "siroc- 
co," "mistral" and "Chinook"? 

3. MEASUREMENTS: A triennial 
event occurs how often? 

4. MOVIES: Who was the Oscar- 
winning director of the "The Silence 
of the Lambs"? 

5. LANGUAGE: What does the 
Greek prefix "cyto-" mean? 

6. COMICS: What famous comics 
character had a girlfriend named Dale 
Arden? 

7. HISTORY: When did the USS 
Maine explode in Havana's harbor, 
an event that preceded the Spanish- 
American War? 

8. LITERATURE: Henry David Tho- 
reau's famous Walden Pond is nearest 
to which town? 

9. MYTHOLOGY: Who is the Norse 
goddess of love and fertility? 

10. GEOGRAPHY: Cork and Limer- 
ick are major cities of which nation? 



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Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 




Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



The decline of 
the American 
politician 



Catherine Beverly 

Opinions editor 




A: 



s a college 
student 
who only 
recently became 
involved in politics, 
I am surprised by 
what I see from the 
potential leaders of this country. 

When I picture a leader of the 
United States, I see a person who 
is an intellectual. Although I know 
this is unlikely, I had hoped I would 
be closer to the mark rather than 
farther. 

During the recent debates, some 
of the candidates have shown 
their lack of preparedness and 
understanding of the politics of 
America. 

While I consider myself to 
be fairly undereducated when it 
comes to politics, I have a basic 
understanding of the state of world 
politics. 

Two recent examples of the 
decline of the American politician 
come from two 2012 presidential 
candidates: Herman Cain and Rick 
Perry (not that either one of these 
men were leading in the polls). 

Not only did Herman Car 
quesuon the iniervis 
President Obama's actions in 
Libya, he also claims he misspoke 
in regards to his denial of China's 
nuclear capabilities. 

This example, along with a few 
other instances, Cain has gained 
a reputation as someone who was 
not very knowledgeable in recent 
events in politics. 

I learned of these events from 
my daily reading of Yahoo! News 
As much as I sympathize with the 
pressure he is under, I also realize 
that this man was attempting to 
lead a nation of approximately 312 
million people. 

He should be able to act 
exceptionally well under pressure 
and should definitely be able to 
recall basic facts regarding recent 
political situations. 

Rick Perry on the other hand did 
not seem to have a very good grasp 
on his own political strategy. In a 
now infamous November debate, he 
could not recall the last of the three 
government agencies he planned to 
eliminate if he became president. 

This mistake could be reduced 
to simple human error, but I expect 
more from a person who may be 
representing me as an American 
in the future. I expect more of the 
president, even of the presidential 
candidates, than I do from the 
average American on the street. 

While charisma is important 
in a president, is it too much to 
ask to have a person capable of 
remembering his or her own lines 
(because no political candidates 
seem to speak for themselves 
anymore)? 

It is easy to see a decline in the 
American educational system, but I 
would have hoped that this did not 
apply to politicians that plan to run 
for high office positions as well. 

Maybe one day the American 
population will finally see that 
political reform can only come 
about when there are intelligent 
people in charge of this country. 

All of this change begins in 
public school, but that is an entirely 
different article. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 



i 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
January 18, 2012 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Colin Bear swings for the fences in Southland Conference game against Southeastern Louisiana University. 

Bear develops into star player 



Shana Lee 

Sauce Reporter 

Colin Bear, a Houston, 
Texas native, has had an 
exceptional baseball career at 
Northwestern State University. 

Bear, a left-handed pitcher and 
designated hitter, has been an asset 
to the Demon baseball team. 

When Colin was in his junior 
year at Saint Thompson High 
School, several colleges began 
showing interest in his baseball 
abilities. This is when Colin knew 
he had a desire to play baseball 
at the collegiate level. As a child. 
Bear loved watching baseball on 
television. 

When his parents encouraged 
him to try and play, he was all for 
it and began by playing t-ball at the 
young age of four and continued 
through high school. Despite 
his love for baseball, Bear never 
imagined his baseball career would 
go so far. 

"I would have never thought a 
few years later I would be playing 
the game 1 love at college," said 
Bear. 

He decided to attend Northwestern 
State University when he got a call 
from Coach Davis his junior year of 



high school. 

•'When I came on my visit I 
really liked the coaching staff and 
the team. I talked to my parents and 
we decided this was the best place 
for me." 

Coming to Northwestern has 
given Bear many memories and 
opportunities he needed to have a 
successful baseball career. 

"My favorite memory from my 
career at NSU would be playing 
left field and beating LSU in Baton 
Rouge," Bear said. 

Any student athlete will tell you 
how much advice everyone has for 
you, but every now and then you 
get something that really sticks with 
you. 

For Bear, the best advice he has 
received was to pursue his own 
dreams and never give up. 

Now that his collegiate career 
is almost over, he said he hopes to 
keep playing baseball after college. 
It has been a lifelong dream of his 
to play professional baseball. 

Most student-athletes would 
agree that the four years spent 
with a team would impact their 
life forever. They have created 
friends that become like family and 
memories that will last a lifetime. 

"Coach Davis has pushed me 



to be the best player I can be. 
Throughout the years all the 
instructions and advice has helped 
me grow into the player I am today. 
Playing with these groups of guys 
has been a great experience and 
taught me a lot of things about 
baseball and life in general." 
Will Watson, Colin's teammate 
explained how wonderful of a role 
model he is for everyone. 

"Colin has led the team in 
scoring, and we expect him to have 
a great senior year,*' Watson said. 

With the support from the 
community, teammates and 
coaching staff, he is expected to 
have a memorable senior year with 
the Demon baseball team. 

Bear, who is majoring in 
industrial engineering technology, 
said he tries to live by the motto 
"live everyday like it is your last." 
Along with All-Louisiana baseball 
honors, Bear led the team with a 
.340 batting average, five homemns 
and 41 runs batted in. 

Bear was ranked third in the 
Southland Conference in doubles 
and led the league with 1 3 two- 
baggers in league games only and 
ended the season on a 1 4-game 
hitting streak. 



NSU softball prepares for season opener at ULM 



Courtesy of Sports Info 

After reaching the conference 
tournament for the first time 
in five years, the Northwest- 
ern State softball program will look 
to continue its success against 2012 
opponents as it released its full sea- 
son schedule. 

The Lady Demons will participate 
in four challenging non-conference 
tournaments, and will play a high- 
light double-header against Baylor 
who finished third in the College 
World Series last season. 

"This is the toughest non-confer- 
ence schedule we've had since I've 
been here," said head coach Donald 
Pickett, who enters his fourth season 
at the helm. "Our program has got- 
ten stronger and stronger every year, 
and our non-conference schedule re- 
flects that." 

NSU will kick off the season at 
Monroe, La. for the ULM Mardi 
Gras Classic. It will square off 
against SIU-Edwardsville, ULM, 
IUPUI, Southeast Missouri State 
and Grambling. 

The Lady Demons w ill then travel 
to Lafayette, La. for the Mardi Gras 
Invitational against La. Tech, UNC, 
ULL, UTEP and Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 

To close out February, NSU will 
take part in the Arkansas Fastpitch 
Invitational in Fayetteville, Ark. 

"Playing a SEC team, at their 
place, will definitely be a good, ear- 
ly test for us," Pickett said. "We are 
looking forward to getting that op- 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
The Lady Demon softball team enters this season under the direction 
of head coach Donald Pickett for the fourth season. 



portunity to play against them." 

The Lady Demons will play their 
home opener on March 3 against 
ULM in one of four games at the 
Northwestern State Demons Invi- 
tational. They will also play host to 
Southern, before travelling to Baton 
Rouge for a rematch doubleheader 
on March 7. 

Other non-conference matchups 
include contests against future SLC 
member Houston Baptist (Feb. 29), 
and Houston (March 14). The Cou- 
gars qualified as a super-regional 
team last season, and had a chance 
to get in the College World Series. 

"Overall, our schedule is filled 
with quality opponents and early 
tests, and that should get us prepared 
for our conference season," Pickett 



said. "Tougher competition is only 
going to make us better as a team in 
the end." 

NSU will then open conference 
play on the road against Sam Hous- 
ton State in a three-game series 
starting on March 9. The conference 
schedule this season has been re- 
duced to just 20 games, as opposed 
to 30 that have traditionally been 
played. 

"That just makes each game mean 
so much more," Pickett said, on the 
20 game schedule. 

The Lady Demons will play home 
conference series against TAMUCC 
(March 16-17), McNeese State 
(March 23-24), Stephen F. Austin 
(April 6-7), Southeastern La. (April 
24) and Texas State (April 27-28). 



Interested in writing for the Sauce? 

Come by our office in 227 Kyser and apply to become a staff writer for 
The Current Sauce. Meetings start at 6 p.m. every Monday. We hope to 
hear from you. 

-The Current Sauce staff 



Demons look for redemption against UTSA 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

The Demon basketball team 
looks to heal wounds in 
tonight's game against the 
defending Southland Conference 
Tournament champions, University 
of Texas at San Antonio. 

NSU (2-1) is coming off of a 
77-73 home-loss to the University 
of Central Arkansas which 
showcased an uninspired second- 
half performance that allowed the 
Bears to claw their way back from a 
1 7-point deficit. 

Demon basketball head coach 
Michael McConathy said it was 
frustrating to see the lead diminish, 
but the team was able to work 
against a zone defensive team. 

"It's a disappointing outcome, 
losing at home. Now we have 
to go on the road and steal one 
someplace," McConathy said. 

The Roadrunners are 2-1 in SLC 
play, having lost a game to Corpus 
Christi last Wednesday. 

Senior Demon guard Shamir 
Davis said it comes down to how 
well the team prepares during 
the practices. The team's bench 
performance was unusually low last 
game, and that will have to change 
for the Demons to earn a win 
against the Roadrunners. 

UTSA is a team that utilizes a 
1-1-3 zone defense, something that 




91.7 FM 



ofKNWD 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
William Mosley skys to reject the potential UCA scorer. He had seven 
blocks for the game. The Demons lost 77-73. 



has been hard for the Demons to 
overcome in the past. 

"A lot of teams throw zone 
defenses at us," junior forward 
James Hulbin said. "They all figure 
that's our weakness and it becomes 
especially hard to overcome w hen 
shots aren't falling." 



NSU shot just 35 percent from 
the floor in the second half of 
Saturday's game against UCA 
thanks to the defensive switch to 

For rest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



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NORTHWESTERN STATE 

DEMONS 






Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, January 25, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 97: Issue 14 



SGA prepares for new semester 



Jarred Roberts 

News Co-Editor 

Zech Jones, SGA speaker of 
the house took attendance 
as the second SGA meeting 
went underway 7 p.m. Monday in 
the President's Room of the Student 
Union. 

For about an hour, SGA 
reviewed their agenda for the week. 
Despite meeting several times a 
month, every meeting has many 
topics to discuss. Topics that were 
discussed included: Up 'Til Dawn, 
club sports, new SGA members, 
the budget and more. A handful of 
these topics were just reminders 
of upcoming events or things that 
needed to be done. 

SGA members voted on the 
admittance of four new members. 
Each prospective member had 
to present themselves to the 
association and explain why 
they wanted to join, what they 
would bring to SGA and answer 
any questions asked by current 
members. 



Vice President Jake Funderburk, 
a political science major asked 
the prospective members which 
department they felt they were best 
equipped since he is responsible for 
placing senators into the different 
departments. 

Since Funderburk 's department 
was cut, he joined SGA so that 
he could he have a voice and to 
help other students avoid similar 
situations. He intends to increase 
the amount of attention given 
to satellite campuses because 
he believes that they have been 
neglected in previous years. 

After a questioning session 
with the SGA members, the four 
prospective members were asked 
to leave the room so that the voting 
could commence. All of the votes 
were in favor of the prospective 
members interested in joining the 
association. 

The new members are: LaMario 
Fortson, Ethan Hayes from the 
Scholar's college, and the remaining 
two, Ashley Haynes and Derrick 
Houston, are previous members 



who are returning to the SGA ranks. 

Mathew Morrison, SGA 
treasurer proposed the budget. 
Morrison is in his eighth semester 
with SGA. Before Morrison was 
treasurer, he was elected as senator 
and speaker of the house. 

While there were quite a few 
questions asked to the new SGA 
members in the program, there 
were far more questions and 
comments about the new budget. 
These students are serious about 
shaping what happens on campus, 
but try not to let the responsibilities 
stress them out. Throughout the 
budget debate and the rest of the 
meeting, the members were able 
to share laughter, and the entire 
scene resembles a friendlier warmer 
version of C-SPAN. 

Tara Luck, SGA president 
for three years, is responsible 
for meeting with the faculty and 
presenting new bills, proposals, 
budgets and making sure the 
students' concerns are voiced. 

The budget passed and Luck 
adjourned the meeting. 




photo by: Jarred Roberts/News Editor 
SGA meets every Monday at 7 p.m. in the President's Room of the Student Union. 



Bernhard construction helps NSU with renovations 



J.C. Bryant 

Staff Reporter 



I 



n an effort to conserve energy, 
NSU is undergoing renova- 
tions that will make the build- 
ings more efficient and mod- 
ern. 

This renovation project began in 
July 201 1 and completion is expect- 
ed this spring. 

This process requires removal of 



the university's high pressure steam 
distribution lines to be replaced with 
more than 9,000 feet of carbon steel 
welded pipe. 

Selected for the job was Bernhard, 
a full-service mechanical contrac- 
tor since 1919, which specializes in 
heating, ventilation, air conditioning 
and plumbing services. 

Over the past 1 years, they have 
completed nearly 160 mechanical 
installations and upgrades for the 



majority of Louisiana's universities 
and colleges, including projects on 
campus such as Iberville Dining Hall 
and A. A. Fredricks Auditorium. 

Dwayne Broussard, project man 
ager for the NSU contracts, shared 
that the construction included much 
more than just an upgraded mechan- 
ical system. 

"The Beauregard Hall renovation 
should give the campus the ability to 
draw students because of its up-to- 



date technology and design. Ellen- 
der Hall was a project that took a lot 
of planning and scheduling because 
we only had six weeks to complete 
it in order for the Manning Camp 
students to be able to use the facil- 
ity. It was a high profile project and 
with the help of NSC, the engineer- 
ing team and a number of good, hard 
working people, this job was com- 
pleted on time and the students were 
able to sleep in a nice, comfortable 



building during their stay at NSU," 
Broussard said. 

There are three separate projects 
Bernhard has been working on, all 
with separate budgets: Beauregard 
Hall Renovation (budgeted at $4.25 
million), Peciolla Hall (budgeted at 
$150,000) and Ellender Hall HVAC 
Upgrade (budgeted at $1.1 million). 

Broussard added that these jobs 
were considered small to medium, 
as Bernhard has installed projects as 
large as $15 million to $30 million. 



Students have already begun to 
see the positive effect renovation has 
on the university. 

"It's encouraging to see our 
school making efforts to stay up-to- 
date in all its departments," Luke 
Teutsch said. 

Northwestern State University 
has had quite a history with Bern- 
hard, and NSU will continue to see 
Bernhard carry out quality projects 
across the campus and the state of 
Louisiana in the future. 



University to host Louisiana Thespian Festival 




Theatre West will host events in the Louisiana Thespian Festival 



Courtesy of News Bureau: 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity hosts the 2012 Louisiana 
Thespian Festival Jan. 27- 
28, in the A.A. Fredericks Center 
for Creative and Performing Arts. 
Approximately 600 junior high and 
high school students from through- 
out Louisiana will participate in 
worshops and performances and au- 
dition for college scholarships. 

"This year's festival is a collabo- 
ration of the student's hard work and 
dedication to theatre," said Louisi- 
ana Thespian Festival chair, Kerry 
A. Onxley. "The very best of theatre 



work is displayed at this festival." workshops on acting, Shakespeare, 



NSU Police 
Blotter 

Reports from the NSU 
police station from 
Jan 16-22 

fan. 16 

7:24 p.m. - Student injured at 
Theater West 

7:40 p.m. - Hazardous area of 
CAPA roped off until repairs 



Northwestern Theatre and Dance 
faculty, staff and students will be 
involved in the festival, conducting 
workshops and auditions and over- 
seeing logistics for the event. 

"The Louisiana Thespian Festival 
attracts the best theatre students in 
the state and we are glad they chose 
to have the event at Northwestern 
State," said Scott Burrell, coordina- 
tor of Theatre and Dance at North- 
western State. "We know a number 
of these students from past festivals. 
This is a great opportunity for us to 
showcase our program." 

During the weekend theatre cel- 
ebration, students participate in 



improvisations, voice, musical the- 
atre, dance, stage combat, makeup, 
costuming, lighting and more. The 
festival concludes with performanc- 
es of some of the best acts presented 
during the weekend. 

The festival is presented by the 
Louisiana Thespians Society, a com- 
ponent of the international Educa- 
tional Theatre Associational (EdTA). 
The Louisiana Thespian Society ex- 
ists as a non-profit theatre service 
organization for junior high and high 
school theatre programs. Member- 
ship includes junior and high school 
students, theatre teachers and art ad- 
vocates. 



Jan. 17 
11:38 a.m. 
at UP2 



Jan. 18 
1:10 a.m. 
UP1 



■ Disturbance reported 



Loud music reported at 



12:36 p.m. - Collision at Watson 

5:37 p.m. - Skateboarders seen at 
UP I. advised to stop their actions 
and leave 



Jan. 19 

1:30 p.m. - Skateboarders observed, 
advised them to stop 

11:27 p.m. - Student observed 

w alking pitbull on campus, advised 

student to leave campus 

Jan. 21 

2:02 a.m. - police requested at 
Kappa Sig house 



Jan. 22 
10:58 p.m. 
Varnado 



.Loud noise reported in 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



National News 

Popular file hosting site Megaup- 
load shut down: Last Thursday the 
file hosting site Megaupload.com 
was taken down by the U.S. Gov- 
ernment. Recently ranking 1 3th on 
the most vistied sites, Megaupload 
was brought down for the massive 
amounts of copyrighted material 
that it hosted. 

Dentist pleads guilty to using pa- 
per clips: A former dentist in Mas- 



sachusetts pleaded guilty to using 
paperclips for root canals instead 
of stainless steel posts in order to 
save money. The cheap material can 
cause pain and infection. 

Utah study shows proof of Face- 
book depression: A study from 
Utah Valley University polled 425 
students. Those that spent more time 
on Facebook were also more likely 
to confess that they thought other 
people had better lives than they did. 

Illinois man calls 9-1-1 to pick a 



TSghTTomTTO'aceTlaTaTIed^po^ 

lice at 4 a.m. requesting police 
so he could fight them. When the 
police arrived he became vio- 
lent and was arrested. His bail is 
$100,000. 

New Jersey synagogues at- 
tacked by local: Held at $5 mil- 
lion bail for several attempted 
murder charges and arson, 19 
year-old Anthony Graziano threw 
Molotov cocktails at two syna- 
gogues on Jan. 3 and Jan. 1 1 . 



Wednesday 

76761° 



Thursday 

66748° 



Friday 

65739° 



Saturday 

66736° 



Sunday 

65740° 



Monday 

70749° 



Tuesday 

74746° 







Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
January 25, 2012 



Pursuing the crown: Hope McFarland looks to win another title 

Alexis Reliford 

Staff Reporter 



Behind the formal dresses, 
make-up and bright smile is 
a small-town girl with big 
dreams and a love for children. 

From Keithville, LA, Hope 
Mcfarland is the 2011-2012 Miss 
Black and Gold winner and will 
represent the Theta Chi chapter 
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, 
Incorporated as their "Queen of 
Pyramids" at the district pageant 
competition. 

"I love getting ready, all of the 
outfits and prepping," she said. 

McFarland started participating 
in pageants at the age of 13 
under the influence of her father, 
and is full of experience. She 
previously competed in the Miss 
Teen Louisiana and Miss Festival 
City pageants and also placed 
second runner-up in NSU's Lady 
of the Bracelet Pageant last year. 
More recently, McFarland became 
Miss Heart of Cajunland this past 
Sunday. 

"I used to be really shy, but 
now I don't get stage fright at all," 
McFarland said. 

McFarland's favorite part of the 
pageant is the talent portion, and for 
her talent she plays classical music 
on her violin. 

The senior early childhood 



education major grew up on a 
farm, is the second of four, and the 
only female of her siblings. After 
receiving her bachelor's degree, 
she'd like to begin teaching and 
later return to get her master's 
degree. Although her dream is to 
eventually open her own child 
development center, she won't be 
giving up on her big pageant dreams 
anytime soon. 

"I would lov e to be Miss 
America one day, but I'll try Miss 
Louisiana first," she said. 

Her hobbies include community 
service, working out, shopping 
and enjoying the great outdoors. 
McFarland is currently president of 
the Iota Mu chapter of Delta Sigma 
Theta Sorority, Incorporated and 
is also a member of both the Blue 
Key and Kappa Delta Pi Honor 
Societies. Previously, she performed 
in the Northwestern Symphony 
Orchestra and was involved with 
the Demon radio station, KNWD. 
McFarland was also a member 
of the 201 1 Homecoming Honor 
Court. 

McFarland will compete for 
the district title of Miss Black and 
Gold on Jan. 28 at 8 p.m. at the Sai 
Convention Center in Alexandria, 
LA. 

If McFarland wins the district 
title, she will compete for the 
regional title in Arkansas. 




Submitted Photo 

McFarland flanked by members of the Theta Chi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc after being 
crowned the 2011-2012 Miss Black and Gold. 




Musician Scott Porter visits 
NSU Leesville campus 



Submitted Photo 

Singer/Songwriter Scott Porter hopes to perform more of his music at NSU in the future. 



Sarah Hale 

Staff Reporter 

Scott Porter, 23-year-old, 
singer and songwriter 
welcomed students as they 
poured into the NSU Leesville 
campus lounge for his performance 
last Wednesday. 

Porter is a self-taught acoustic/ 
rock artist from St. Louis, Missouri. 
He has performed at various venues, 
including the Halo Bar and The 
Duck Room in Blueberry Hill. 

"I feel like the luckiest guy in 
the world because I get paid to 
travel the world and play guitar. I 
grew up playing sports, but after a 
while my interest in music sort of 
overshadowed my interest in sports. 
Eventually I gave up basketball for 
music," Porter said. 



Influenced by music from 
artists John Mayer and The Zac 
Brown Band, Porter has written 
and performed several of his own 
songs. Songs from his latest album 
"Closer," include "Up To You" and 
"Barely Breathing." 

"Out of the songs on my album 
'Closer', 'Barely Breathing' is the 
one with the highest download rate 
on ITunes," Porter said. 

Porter also performed a few 
new songs, including "Watch the 
Sunset" and "More Than Amazing." 
He hopes to make a new album 
sometime this summer. 

During Porter's performance of 
The Jackson5 song "I Want You 

For rest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Coffeehouse looks to provide nearby social place for NSU students 

Memrie Gibbins 

Staff Reporter 



Anew coffeehouse is in the 
brew for NSU. 
Co-owners Kim Craig and 
Erin Austin will open The Steamin' 
Demon Coffeehouse and Roaster 
early February across campus on 
University Parkway. 

Craig and Austin thought their 
new business venture was necessary 
for a college town. 

"Students need a place to gather 
and socialize and to get good coffee 
for a reasonable price," Craig said. 

The owners' memories of 
kicking back at a local coffeehouse 
during their college days motivated 
them to give other students the same 
experience. 

"We remember coming here and 
hanging out at PJ's when we were 
in college at Northwestern and what 
a good experience it was," Craig 

Amber Waves 




In early Feb., The Steamin' Demon will open across from NSU. The owners hope it wil 
students to enjoy beverages and socialize. 



Submitted photo 
provide a place for 



said. 

Kyle Crawford, a junior musical 
theatre major looks forward to 
checking out the new spot in town. 



"I'm really excited about it. I 
love coffeehouses. I will probably 
be spending a lot of time there. 
As long as they have lattes and 



cappuccinos, I'll be happy," 
Crawford said. 

Jonathan Bordelon, a junior 
computer information systems 



major, hopes to see a variety of 
options on the menu. 

"I want to see the usual 
coffeehouse products. I would like 
all of the different flavors and types 
of beverages, as well as scones, 
bagels and pastries," Bordelon said. 

The Steamin' Demon 
Coffeehouse and Roaster will 
offer everything from pastries and 
breakfast foods to espresso and 
fountain drinks. 

There will be study and meeting 
rooms where students can meet. The 
owners plan to support local talent 
by hosting open mic nights, live 
entertainment and art displays. 

"Our basic policy will be as long 
as people are fair to us, we'll be fair 
to them," Austin said. 

The drive- thru will open from 

6 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. The lobby will be open from 

7 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 




Jacob Labutka 

Fashion Columnist 

Closing the gender 
gap in fashion 

As an industry, fashion 
perpetuates a distinction 
between the wardrobes and 
beauty of men and women. In any 
department store, vendor or Wal- 
Mart Supercenter, the selection of 
clothing or cosmetics is segregated 
into our society 's two dominating 
genders. This segregation makes 
you believe that everything you 
need to look and feel chic is within 
that one department. Is it really 
socially stigmatizing if I dare to 
cross the gender divide? 

A frequent complaint I hear 
from many of my girlfriends is 
that T-shirts "made for women" 
are often not comfortable, have 
an awkward fit and the material 
is often too thin. The men's 
department has become a haven 
for women who do not want to 
be fashionable at the expense of 
comfort and fit. 

For the most part, I have come 
to realize that most women do not 
have a problem shopping outside 
their traditional department. The 
tougher nut to crack are the breed 
of shoppers who dare not cross the 
border into foreign departments: the 
stubborn male shopper. 

I'm not entirely attempting to 
overthrow the use of the men's 
department by men. There are 
merely some men, like myself, 
who do not have the typical body 
frame to fit clothes in the men's 
department. 

Although seemingly 
blasphemous to the male order, 
there is nothing inherently wrong 
with a guy who doesn't fit into 
the traditional men's boot cut 
and straight leg styles, buying a 
pair of girl's jeans. Many stores 
like Buckle sell both men's and 
women's jeans in sizes that are 
measured by the waist and inseam. 

This next piece of advice deals 
with what men have the greatest 
trouble incorporating into their daily 
routine: cosmetics. Many men do 
not have a daily routine. All in all, 
the hardest department to get any 
man to buy from is cosmetics. 

I'm not saying all men should 
look like a drag queen in the Castro 
district of San Francisco. However, 
there is nothing effeminate about 
a man using moisturizer to combat 
dry skin and using bit of Biosilk in 
his hair after washing it. 

I will even go so far as to say 
that some makeup is not bad for 
guys to use on a daily basis. We are 
not all blessed with an even skin 
tone and applying foundation, at 
the very least, is a good remedy for 
that. 

I salute the man who dares to 
go beyond and also use primer 
and concealer. But when applying 
anything, always remember that to 
give yourself a natural look, less is 
more. 

I challenge everyone not to shop 
solely based on what stores tell 
you is "masculine" or "feminine." 
Rather, make purchases that make 
you look and feel the most fabulous 
regardless of the department. 



1 1 v n avi I '. Phi uxks MAMA'S &OYZ 




f 1*341 : IT< TO tf 



WWW.MAMA SBQYZ.COM JBRRY CRAF T 






Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
January 25, 2012 



Rants: Restricting 
the 'Wild, Wild Net 



Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



D: 



I ear reader, 
as a fellow 
student I am sure you were aware of 
and gravely affected by the internet 
blackout last Wednesday. 

From what I understand, it was 
in protest of two bills in legislature 
right now: SOPA and PIPA. 

I am just glad that Facebook was 
not shut down. Not because I need 
to tell everyone that I am bored 
and writing my opinion column, 
but because what would happen if 
a billion people could not? Chaos, 
that's what! 

According to news sources, the 
bills are designed to protect creators 
and inventors from copyright 
transgressions and intellectual 
piracy online. Those opposed to 
these bills argue that it restricts free 
speech on the web. 

Admittedly, I am only choosing 
to write about this because it is a 
big deal and because I wrote about 
online matters in the previous week. 
While this issue is still developing, 
here are my contemplations thus far. 
I read somewhere (I can't recollect 
where) that the internet is one of the 
greatest experiments of anarchy in 
the world. 

Consider this: you are watching 
Rebecca Black's "Friday" on 
YouTube and you shout (the 
original ALL CAPS) the first 20 
comments in public. At the very 
least, you would be fined a hefty 
sum for public indecency. 

Yet other activities (such as: 



viewing pornography: selling 
controlled substances [weapons, 
alcohol, etc.]: slandering an 
indiv idual: 'borrowing' music 
and videos) are much easier to do 
online, if not more permissible, too. 

That is, as long as you can tick 
a box or enter the funky looking 
words correctly. That proves you're 
18, right? 

The internet is essentially a 
frontier, vast and void of most 
regulations found in the physical 
world. It is the "Wild, Wild 'Net." 

So what is the harm in protecting 
what people create online? As a 
writer, I value free speech, but 
free speech does not permit me to 
publish Mark Twain, Kanye West, 
or anyone else's works and call 
those works my own. 

In the physical world, we have 
(mostly) free speech (I have talked 
about this last semester.) However, 
in the virtual world, it seems that we 
do have completely free speech. 

I am not sure what the fuss is 
all about. I know I do not want 
my articles to be republished as 
someone else's and these are just 
the lowly opinion articles of some 
student. 

What I am failing to understand 
here how protecting online 
copyrights restricts my virtual free 
speech? I do not think that it does. 

Take a look at the first line of 
SOPA: "Nothing in this Act shall be 
construed to impose a prior restraint 
on free speech or the press protected 
under the First Amendment to the 
Constitution." (SOPA 2012) 

If you have a firm grasp on this 
subject or if you disagree with me, 
feel free to comment on the Current 
Sauce's online publication or to 
submit an article. 



We need writers! 



Our newspaper needs stories written by 
students. 

Come by our office, 227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every Monday at 6 p.m. We 
hope to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



Volunteering: Help 
others, help yourself 



Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 




s 




The 

GurrentSauce 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

^atie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist Delivery Personnel 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 



Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 




Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



omething 1 
have 
always 
found astonishing 
about our 
generation is 
the utter lack 
of involvement. Now I am not 
referring to entertainment (such 
as sports or television), but I am 
focused solely on the community 
serv ice side of involvement. 

This involvement involves 
participating in politics on a 
local and national scale, being an 
informed citizen, supporting local 
arts in your community, and even 
doing something as simple as, say, 
reading an editorial in the Current 
Sauce. 

It may come as a surprise to 
some, but these articles are attempts 
to reach out to the student body and 
make them care about something- 
anything. 

In an attempt to make my point 
connect, 1 will reference a song 
readers may recognize: "You gotta 
get it right while you got the time, 
'cause when you close your heart, 
you close your mind." Michael 
Jackson sang these lyrics in 1988, 
and they still ring true today. 

The town of Natchitoches is 
below the state poverty level. 
According to city-data.com, 
statistics show that 30 percent of 
Natchitoches residents are below 
the poverty level, and 86 percent 
of these cases involve families in 
single-parent homes. 

Nothing will ever be quite right 
about a community that closes its 
heart to those citizens who need a 
helping hand. While it may seem 
easier to sit back and watch the 



world spinning around you, it is not 
particularly fulfilling. 

Some of the most moving 
moments of my life hav e been 
the result of something I did to 
help someone else. Volunteering 
at the organization "Big Brothers, 
Big Sisters" let me see many 
children find their escapes from 
sometimes brutal home lives while 
the organization "Habitat for 
Humanity" provided me with a way 
to better my community and help 
families in need. 

Accordingtobls.gov, 1,000 
fewer people volunteered in 2010 
than they did in the previous year. 
While this may not seem like a huge 
drop, it is drastic when you consider 
the homes that were not built as 
quickly, the children who were left 
with no role models or the animals 
that sat alone in their kennels. 

Volunteering does not take much 
time out of your schedule. As few as 
three or four hours every weekend 
is enough to make a person's (or an 
animal's) life happier and healthier. 

Imagine what volunteering 
could do for someone else. And you 
thought you needed a college degree 
to change the world. Next time > ou 
are sitting alone in your dorm room. 
boro' 1 'V' 
beuer u.c mis community. 

Some good places to start 
volunteering are: local veterinary 
clinics, shelters, on-campus clubs 
and organizations or at www. 
dosomething.org. "Do Something" 
gives people the chance to start up 
their own volunteering organization 
with nation-wide support, and it 
could be an opportunity to create 
start-up grants and scholarships. 

But remember: in order to 
change the world, you have to start 
with what you see in the mirror. 



BUT TRUE 

By Samantha Weaver 

• It was American ventriloquist and 
comedian Willie Tyler who made the 
following sage observation: "The 
reason lightning doesn't strike twice 
in the same place is that the same 
place isn't there the second time." 

• Even flight attendants have their 
own patron saint, as declared by Pope 
Paul XXIII in 1962: Saint Bona of 
Pisa. 

• Many people believe that the 
Gutenberg Bible, which came from 
the presses of Johannes Gutenberg 
in the 1450s, is the first example of 
a printed book, but that's not true: it's 
the first book printed using movable 
type. The oldest known printed book 
is actually the "Diamond Sutra," 
which was printed in China more 
than 550 years before the Gutenberg 
Bible. 

• In many Middle Eastern cultures, 
it is traditional to celebrate a wed- 
ding with five events. The first is the 
engagement party, during which the 
bride-to-be changes clothes several 
times. When the bride and groom sign 
the marriage contract there is another 
party, again with numerous changes 
of clothing by the bride. The day 
before the wedding there is a henna 
party, during which the bride and oth- 
ers are painted with elaborate designs 
that are thought to ward off evil spir- 
its. The reception takes place after the 
wedding, and guests are often given 
five almond pieces, each piece sym- 
bolizing one of the sacred wedding 
wishes: health, happiness, wealth, 
longevity and fertility. Seven days 
after the wedding is the final celebra- 
tory event, known as sabaa, which is 
for women only and is analogous to 
the wedding shower we have in the 
West. 




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Answers 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

v/^A/^A^ithecurrsntsauce 100111 



r 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
January 25, 2012 



64-61 

Last-second three lifts Demons past scrappy McNeese Cowboys 




The Demons beat McNeese 64-61. The team returns home tonight against Lamar University. 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

James Hulbin's game-winning 
tip at the buzzer didn't count. 
Thanks to Shamir Davis' sub- 
sequent 3-pointer at the buzzer, 
it didn't matter, as Northwestern 
State escaped with a 64-61 South- 
land Conference basketball win Sat- 
urday at McNeese State. 

Hulbin tipped in what would have 
been a game-winner, but an obvious, 
and ultimately ruled inadvertent, 
whistle by a game official negated 
the basket. After three looks at the 
review monitor, officials gave NSU 
the ball underneath the Demons' 
basket with 1 .2 seconds put back on 
the clock. 

Louis Ellis tried to inbound the ball, 
but called timeout when he didn't 
find an open teammate. After going 
to their bench, NSU came out with 
a different plan as Ellis looked into 
the near corner, where Davis cut off 
a pair of picks by Gary Stewart and 
William Mosley, took the inbounds 
pass and drained a 3-pointer in front 
of the Demons bench to win the see- 
saw game. 

"They had the middle jammed up 
and we couldn't get the entry pass, 
so we called time out and (assistant) 
coach (Bill) Lewit drew up a play 
with a pick, and Shamir rubbed off 
it perfectly and knocked down the 
shot," said Mike McConathy, the 
Demons' 13th-year coach. 

Northwestern ( 1 0-9 overall, 3-2 
in the Southland) led by 14 in each 
half, but McNeese rallied to open a 
59-53 lead with 6:08 remaining. In a 
two-minute span, Mosley scored the 
last six of his team-high 16 points on 
a short jumper, two free throws and 
a transition dunk after rebounding at 
the other end to tie the game 59-59 
with two minutes left. 



McNeese (7-10, 3-2) went up on a 
Patrick Richard basket, but Dav is hit 
a driving layup with 1 : 15 to go to tie 
it at 61- all. Richard drove the lane 
with 40 seconds left but NSU forced 
McNeese's 24th turnover, knocking 
the ball out of bounds and giving the 
visitors the ball with a last-second 
chance to win. 

Mosley had 6 rebounds, w ith the 



third making him only the third play- 
er in school history to snag 1,000 
in a career. He added 4 steals and 
3 blocks while going 6-6 from the 
floor. Davis finished with 13 points 
while Ellis had 10. 

Richard led all scorers with 28, 
19 while leading McNeese's sec- 
ond-half rally. The Demons gath- 
ered themselves to recover down 



the stretch, outscoring the Cowboys 
11-2 over the final four minutes. 

"We got some stops defensively, 
and were able to get some transition 
baskets out of our defense. We also 
got the ball entered inside to Mos- 
ley after not doing that for most of 
the second half," said McConathy. 
"He wants the ball now. He's our 
yeoman. Part of the problem against 



zones is we're not getting it into him. 
When we did today we were a better 

team." 

The outcome snapped a two-game 
skid by the Demons heading into a 
pair of home games next Wednesday 
night against Lamar and next Satur- 
day against Southeastern Louisiana, 
two East Division foes. NSU moved 
into a tie for the East Division lead 
with the win. 

"It's big. We go from 2-0 to 2-2, 
and now we're 3-2 and back on top 
on our side, after a tough loss at San 
Antonio and one we let slip away 
(wasting a 17-point second-half lead 
against Central Arkansas). It felt like 
we were on a hump the last few days 
and now we're on the right side of 
it," said McConathy. 

After seemingly having won the 
game on Hulbin's tip-in, only to have 
the officials huddle and repeatedly 
review the game tape without ex- 
plaining what they were looking for, 
McConathy was hopeful but nervous 
during the stoppage. 

"I was hoping for a foul, because 
he blew the whistle and started to 
raise his hand. But once they final- 
ly sorted out the situation, it came 
down to making our decision how to 
score, and our young men had to ex- 
ecute it. Louis Ellis calling time out 
on our first inbounds attempt was a 
smart and game-winning play, just 
like James Hulbin made what should 
have been a game-winning tip-in 
that didn't count," said McConathy. 

"We lost one in pretty bizarre 
fashion earlier this year on a banked- 
in 3-pointer at the buzzer in double 
overtime up at Louisiana Tech, and 
we won one in a pretty odd way 
today," he said. "Our guys showed 
some toughness in making the plays 
to win - twice." 



^Jimmie 
Walker 
Editor-in- 
Chief 

Dynomite: Sending 
death threats through 
social media 

Social media sites such as 
Twitter have made the gap 
between our athletics heroes 
and the rest of the world as wide as 
a QWERTY keyboard. 

You can literally engage in a 
conversation with your favorite ce- 
lebrity in 140 characters or less per 
tweet. This is especially the case 
when fans of successful football 
teams praise players via tweet for 
their dominance on the field during 
the playoffs. 

Tebow's performance conjured 
9.420 tweets per second after he 
completed the game-winning touch- 
down pass in overtime against the 
Pittsburgh Steelers. 

49ers receiver Kyle Williams 
found himself on the opposite spec- 
trum of this social phenomenon. He 
became an easy target for verbal 
abuse by angry, heartbroken fans. 

Williams became a worldwide 
trending topic within minutes, as 
tweets directed toward him became 
more violent. One twitter user 
hoped Williams would die in his 
sleep. Another wished death on him, 
his wife and kid. Luckily, Williams 
is not married and doesn't have a 
kid. 

For rest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrcntsauce.com 




u r rent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, January 25, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 14 



SGA prepares for new semester 



Jarred Roberts 

News Co-Editor 

Zech Jones, SGA speaker of 
the house took attendance 
as the second SGA meeting 
went underway 7 p.m. Monday in 
the President's Room of the Student 
Union. 

For about an hour. SGA 
reviewed their agenda for the week. 
Despite meeting several times a 
month, every meeting has many 
topics to discuss. Topics that were 
discussed included: Up "Til Dawn, 
club sports, new SGA members, 
the budget and more. A handful of 
these topics were just reminders 
of upcoming events or things that 
needed to be done. 

SGA members voted on the 
admittance of four new members. 
Each prospective member had 
to present themselves to the 
association and explain why 
they wanted to join, what they 
would bring to SGA and answer 
any questions asked by current 
members. 



Vice President Jake Funderburk, 
a political science major asked 
the prospective members which 
department they felt they were best 
equipped since he is responsible for 
placing senators into the different 
departments. 

Since Funderburk's department 
was cut, he joined SGA so that 
he could he have a voice and to 
help other students avoid similar 
situations. He intends to increase 
the amount of attention given 
to satellite campuses because 
he believes that they have been 
neglected in previous years. 

After a questioning session 
with the SGA members, the four 
prospective members were asked 
to leave the room so that the voting 
could commence. All of the votes 
were in favor of the prospective 
members interested in joining the 
association. 

The new members are: LaMario 
Fortson, Ethan Hayes from the 
Scholar's college, and the remaining 
two, Ashley Haynes and Derrick 
Houston, are previous members 



who are returning to the SGA ranks. 

Mathew Morrison, SGA 
treasurer proposed the budget. 
Morrison is in his eighth semester 
with SGA. Before Morrison was 
treasurer, he was elected as senator 
and speaker of the house. 

While there were quite a few 
questions asked to the new SGA 
members in the program, there 
were far more questions and 
comments about the new budget. 
These students are serious about 
shaping what happens on campus, 
but try not to let the responsibilities 
stress them out. Throughout the 
budget debate and the rest of the 
meeting, the members were able 
to share laughter, and the entire 
scene resembles a friendlier warmer 
version of C-SPAN. 

Tara Luck, SGA president 
for three years, is responsible 
for meeting with the faculty and 
presenting new bills, proposals, 
budgets and making sure the 
students' concerns are voiced. 

The budget passed and Luck 
adjourned the meeting. 




photo by: Jarred Roberts/News Editor 
SGA meets every Monday at 7 p.m. in the President's Room of the Student Union. 



Bernhard construction helps NSU with renovations 



J.C. Bryant 

Staff Reporter 



I 



ern. 



r:jov 



n an effort to conserve energy, 
NSU is undergoing renova- 
tions that will make the build- 
ings more efficient and mod- 



This renovation project began in 
July 201 1 and completion is expect- 
ed this spring. 

This process requires removal of 



the university's high pressure steam 
distribution lines to be replaced with 
more than 9,000 feet of carbon steel 
welded pipe. 

Selected for the job was Bernhard, 
a full-service mechanical contrac- 
tor since 1919, which specializes in 
heating, ventilation, air conditioning 
and plumbing services. 

Over the past 1 years, they have 
completed nearly 160 mechanical 
installations and upgrades for the 



majority of Louisiana's universities 
and colleges, including projects on 
campus such as Iberv ille Dining Hall 
and A. A. Fredricks Auditorium. 

Dwayne Broussard, project man 
ager for the NSU contracts, shared 
that the construction included much 
more than just an upgraded mechan- 
ical system. 

"The Beauregard Hall renovation 
should give the campus the ability to 
draw students because of its up-to- 



date technology and design. Ellen- 
der Hall was a project that took a lot 
of planning and scheduling because 
we only had six weeks to complete 
it in order for the Manning Camp 
students to be able to use the facil- 
ity. It was a high profile project and 
with the help of NSC, the engineer- 
ing team and a number of good, hard 
working people, this job was com- 
pleted on time and the students were 
able to sleep in a nice, comfortable 



building during their stay at NSU," 
Broussard said. 

There are three separate projects 
Bernhard has been working on, all 
with separate budgets: Beauregard 
Hall Renovation (budgeted at $4.25 
million), Peciolla Hall (budgeted at 
$150,000) and Ellender Hall HVAC 
Upgrade (budgeted at $1.1 million). 

Broussard added that these jobs 
were considered small to medium, 
as Bernhard has installed projects as 
large as $15 million to $30 million. 



Students have already begun to 
see the positive effect renovation has 
on the university. 

"It's encouraging to see our 
school making efforts to stay up-to- 
date in all its departments," Luke 
Teutsch said. 

Northwestern State University 
has had quite a history with Bern- 
hard, and NSU will continue to see 
Bernhard carry out quality projects 
across the campus and the state of 
Louisiana in the future. 



University to host Louisiana Thespian Festival 




Theatre West will host events in the Louisiana Thespiar 



Courtesy of News Bureau: 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity hosts the 2012 Louisiana 
Thespian Festival Jan. 27- 
28, in the A.A. Fredericks Center 
for Creative and Performing Arts. 
Approximately 600 junior high and 
high school students from through- 
out Louisiana will participate in 
worshops and performances and au- 
dition for college scholarships. 

"This year's festival is a collabo- 
ration of the student's hard work and 
dedication to theatre," said Louisi- 
ana Thespian Festival chair, Kerry 
A. Onxley. "The very best of theatre 



work is displayed at this festival." 

Northwestern Theatre and Dance 
faculty, staff and students will be 
involved in the festival, conducting 
workshops and auditions and over- 
seeing logistics for the event. 

"The Louisiana Thespian Festival 
attracts the best theatre students in 
the state and we are glad they chose 
to have the event at Northwestern 
State," said Scott Burrell, coordina- 
tor of Theatre and Dance at North- 
western State. "We know a number 
of these students from past festivals. 
This is a great opportunity for us to 
showcase our program." 

During the weekend theatre cel- 
ebration, students participate in 



workshops on acting, Shakespeare, 
improvisations, voice, musical the- 
atre, dance, stage combat, makeup, 
costuming, lighting and more. The 
festival concludes with performanc- 
es of some of the best acts presented 
during the weekend. 

The festival is presented by the 
Louisiana Thespians Society, a com- 
ponent of the international Educa- 
tional Theatre Associational (EdTA). 
The Louisiana Thespian Society ex- 
ists as a non-profit theatre service 
organization for junior high and high 
school theatre programs. Member- 
ship includes junior and high school 
students, theatre teachers and art ad- 
vocates. 



NSU Police 
Blotter 

Reports from the NSU 
police station from 
Jan 16-22 

Jan. 16 

7:24 p.m. - Student injured at 
Theater West 

7:40 p.m. - Hazardous area of 
CAPA roped off until repairs 



Jan. 17 

11:38 a.m. - Disturbance reported 
at UP2 



Jan. 18 

1:10 a.m. - Loud music reported at 
UP] 

12:36 p.m. - Collision at Watson 

5:37 p.m. - Skateboarders seen at 
UP1. advised to stop their actions 
and leave 



Jan. 19 

1:30 p.m. - Skateboarders observed, 
advised them to stop 

11:27 p.m. - Student observed 
walking pitbull on campus, advised 
student to leave campus 

Jan. 21 

2:02 a.m. - police requested at 
Kappa Sig house 



Jan. 22 
10:58 p.m. 
Varnado 



. Loud noise reported in 



National News 

Popular file hosting site Megaup- 
load shut down: Last Thursday the 
file hosting site Megaupload.com 
was taken down by the U.S. Gov- 
ernment. Recently ranking 13th on 
the most vistied sites, Megaupload 
was brought down for the massive 
amounts of copyrighted material 
that it hosted. 

Dentist pleads guilty to using pa- 
per clips: A former dentist in Mas- 



sachusetts pleaded guilty to using 
paperclips for root canals instead 
of stainless steel posts in order to 
save money. The cheap material can 
cause pain and infection. 

Utah study shows proof of Face- 
book depression: A study from 
Utah Valley University polled 425 
students. Those that spent more time 
on Facebook were also more likely 
to confess that they thought other 
people had better lives than they did. 

Illinois man calls 9-1-1 to pick a 



'TgnTTonTTO'acelJaTaTleTpcr 

lice at 4 a.m. requesting police 
so he could fight them. When the 
police arrived he became vio- 
lent and was arrested. His bail is 
$100,000. 

New Jersey synagogues at- 
tacked by local: Held at $5 mil- 
lion bail for several attempted 
murder charges and arson, 19 
year-old Anthony Graziano threw 
Molotov cocktails at two syna- 
gogues on Jan. 3 and Jan. 1 1 . 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

76761° 



Thursday 

66748° 



Friday 

65739° 



Saturday 

66736° 



Sunday 

65740° 



Monday 

70749° 



Tuesday 

74746° 








Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
January 25, 2012 



Pursuing the crown: Hope McFarland looks to win another title 



Alexis Reliford 

Staff Reporter 

Behind the formal dresses, 
make-up and bright smile is 
a small-town girl with big 
dreams and a love for children. 

From Keithville, LA, Hope 
Mcfarland is the 201 1-2012 Miss 
Black and Gold winner and will 
represent the Theta Chi chapter 
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, 
Incorporated as their "Queen of 
Pyramids" at the district pageant 
competition. 

"I love getting ready, all of the 
outfits and prepping," she said. 

McFarland started participating 
in pageants at the age of 1 3 
under the influence of her father, 
and is full of experience. She 
previously competed in the Miss 
Teen Louisiana and Miss Festival 
City pageants and also placed 
second runner-up in NSU's Lady 
of the Bracelet Pageant last year. 
More recently, McFarland became 
Miss Heart of Cajunland this past 
Sunday. 

"I used to be really shy, but 
now I don't get stage fright at all," 
McFarland said. 

McFarland 's favorite part of the 
pageant is the talent portion, and for 
her talent she plays classical music 
on her violin. 

The senior early childhood 



education major grew up on a 
farm, is the second of four, and the 
only female of her siblings. After 
receiving her bachelor's degree, 
she'd like to begin teaching and 
later return to get her master's 
degree. Although her dream is to 
eventually open her own child 
development center, she won't be 
giving up on her big pageant dreams 
anytime soon. 

"I would love to be Miss 
America one day, but I'll try Miss 
Louisiana first," she said. 

Her hobbies include community 
service, working out, shopping 
and enjoying the great outdoors. 
McFarland is currently president of 
the Iota Mu chapter of Delta Sigma 
Theta Sorority, Incorporated and 
is also a member of both the Blue 
Key and Kappa Delta Pi Honor 
Societies. Previously, she performed 
in the Northwestern Symphony 
Orchestra and was involved with 
the Demon radio station, KNWD. 
McFarland was also a member 
of the 201 1 Homecoming Honor 
Court. 

McFarland will compete for 
the district title of Miss Black and 
Gold on Jan. 28 at 8 p.m. at the Sai 
Convention Center in Alexandria, 
LA. 

If McFarland wins the district 
title, she will compete for the 
regional title in Arkansas. 




Submitted Photo 

McFarland flanked by members of the Theta Chi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc after being 
crowned the 2011-2012 Miss Black and Gold. 




Musician Scott Porter visits 
NSU Leesville campus 



Submitted Photo 

Singer/Songwriter Scott Porter hopes to perform more of his music at NSU in the future. 



Sarah Hale 

Staff Reporter 

Scott Porter, 23-year-old, 
singer and songwriter 
welcomed students as they 
poured into the NSU Leesville 
campus lounge for his performance 
last Wednesday. 

Porter is a self-taught acoustic/ 
rock artist from St. Louis, Missouri. 
He has performed at various venues, 
including the Halo Bar and The 
Duck Room in Blueberry Hill. 

"I feel like the luckiest guy in 
the world because I get paid to 
travel the world and play guitar. I 
grew up playing sports, but after a 
while my interest in music sort of 
overshadowed my interest in sports. 
Eventually I gave up basketball for 
music," Porter said. 



Influenced by music from 
artists John Mayer and The Zac 
Brown Band, Porter has written 
and performed several of his own 
songs. Songs from his latest album 
"Closer," include "Up To You" and 
"Barely Breathing." 

"Out of the songs on my album 
'Closer', 'Barely Breathing' is the 
one with the highest download rate 
on ITunes," Porter said. 

Porter also performed a few 
new songs, including "Watch the 
Sunset" and "More Than Amazing." 
He hopes to make a new album 
sometime this summer. 

During Porter's performance of 
The Jackson5 song "I Want You 

For rest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Coffeehouse looks to provide nearby social place for NSU students 

i k ~v r 



Memrie Gibbins 

Staff Reporter 

Anew coffeehouse is in the 
brew for NSU. 
Co-owners Kim Craig and 
Erin Austin will open The Steamin' 
Demon Coffeehouse and Roaster 
early February across campus on 
University Parkway. 

Craig and Austin thought their 
new business venture was necessary 
for a college town. 

"Students need a place to gather 
and socialize and to get good coffee 
for a reasonable price," Craig said. 

The owners' memories of 
kicking back at a local coffeehouse 
during their college days motivated 
them to give other students the same 
experience. 

"We remember coming here and 
hanging out at PJ's when we were 
in college at Northwestern and what 
a good experience it was," Craig 

Amber Waves 











j 






I 











Submitted photo 

In early Feb., The Steamin' Demon will open across from NSU. The owners hope it will provide a place for 
students to enjoy beverages and socialize. 



said. 

Kyle Crawford, a junior musical 
theatre major looks forward to 
checking out the new spot in town. 



"I'm really excited about it. I 
love coffeehouses. I will probably 
be spending a lot of time there. 
As long as they have lattes and 



cappuccinos, I'll be happy," 
Crawford said. 

Jonathan Bordelon, a junior 
computer information systems 



major, hopes to see a variety of 
options on the menu. 

"I want to see the usual 
coffeehouse products. I would like 
all of the different flavors and types 
of beverages, as well as scones, 
bagels and pastries," Bordelon said. 

The Steamin' Demon 
Coffeehouse and Roaster will 
offer everything from pastries and 
breakfast foods to espresso and 
fountain drinks. 

There will be study and meeting 
rooms where students can meet. The 
owners plan to support local talent 
by hosting open mic nights, live 
entertainment and art displays. 

"Our basic policy will be as long 
as people are fair to us, we'll be fair 
to them," Austin said. 

The drive-thru will open from 

6 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. The lobby will be open from 

7 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday through 
Friday. 




Jacob Labutka 

Fashion Columnist 

Closing the gender 
gap in fashion 

As an industry, fashion 
perpetuates a distinction 
between the wardrobes and 
beauty of men and women. In any 
department store, vendor or Wal- 
Mart Supercenter, the selection of 
clothing or cosmetics is segregated 
into our society's two dominating 
genders. This segregation makes 
you believe that everything you 
need to look and feel chic is within 
that one department. Is it really 
socially stigmatizing if I dare to 
cross the gender divide? 

A frequent complaint I hear 
from many of my girlfriends is 
that T-shirts "made for women" 
are often not comfortable, have 
an awkward fit and the material 
is often too thin. The men's 
department has become a haven 
for women who do not want to 
be fashionable at the expense of 
comfort and fit. 

For the most part, I have come 
to realize that most women do not 
have a problem shopping outside 
their traditional department. The 
tougher nut to crack are the breed 
of shoppers who dare not cross the 
border into foreign departments: the 
stubborn male shopper. 

I'm not entirely attempting to 
overthrow the use of the men's 
department by men. There are 
merely some men, like myself, 
who do not have the typical body 
frame to fit clothes in the men's 
department. 

Although seemingly 
blasphemous to the male order, 
there is nothing inherently wrong 
with a guy who doesn't fit into 
the traditional men's boot cut 
and straight leg styles, buying a 
pair of girl's jeans. Many stores 
like Buckle sell both men's and 
women's jeans in sizes that are 
measured by the waist and inseam. 

This next piece of advice deals 
with what men have the greatest 
trouble incorporating into their daily 
routine: cosmetics. Many men do 
not have a daily routine. All in all, 
the hardest department to get any 
man to buy from is cosmetics. 

I'm not saying all men should 
look like a drag queen in the Castro 
district of San Francisco. However, 
there is nothing effeminate about 
a man using moisturizer to combat 
dry skin and using bit of Biosilk in 
his hair after washing it. 

I will even go so far as to say 
that some makeup is not bad for 
guys to use on a daily basis. We are 
not all blessed with an even skin 
tone and applying foundation, at 
the very least, is a good remedy for 
that. 

I salute the man who dares to 
go beyond and also use primer 
and concealer. But when applying 
anything, always remember that to 
give yourself a natural look, less is 
more. 

I challenge everyone not to shop 
solely based on what stores tell 
you is "masculine" or "feminine." 
Rather, make purchases that make 
you look and feel the most fabulous 
regardless of the department. 



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JERRY CRAFT 





Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
January 25, 2012 



Rants: Restricting 
the 'Wild, Wild Net' 




Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



D 



(ear reader, 
as a fellow 
student I am sure you were aware of 
and gravely affected by the internet 
blackout last Wednesday. 

From what I understand, it was 
in protest of two bills in legislature 
right now: SOPA and PIPA. 

I am just glad that Facebook was 
not shut down. Not because I need 
to tell everyone that I am bored 
and writing my opinion column, 
but because what would happen if 
a billion people could not? Chaos, 
that's what! 

According to news sources, the 
bills are designed to protect creators 
and inventors from copyright 
transgressions and intellectual 
piracy online. Those opposed to 
these bills argue that it restricts free 
speech on the web. 

Admittedly, I am only choosing 
to write about this because it is a 
big deal and because I wrote about 
online matters in the previous week. 
While this issue is still developing, 
here are my contemplations thus far. 
I read somewhere (I can't recollect 
where) that the internet is one of the 
greatest experiments of anarchy in 
the world. 

Consider this: you are watching 
Rebecca Black's "Friday" on 
YouTube and you shout (the 
original ALL CAPS) the first 20 
comments in public. At the very 
least, you would be fined a hefty 
sum for public indecency. 

Yet other activities (such as: 



viewing pornography; selling 
controlled substances [weapons, 
alcohol, etc.]; slandering an 
individual: 'borrowing' music 
and v ideos) are much easier to do 
online, if not more permissible, too. 

That is, as long as you can tick 
a box or enter the funky looking 
words correctly. That proves you're 
18, right? 

The internet is essentially a 
frontier, vast and void of most 
regulations found in the physical 
world. It is the "Wild, Wild 'Net." 

So what is the harm in protecting 
what people create online? As a 
writer, I value free speech, but 
free speech does not permit me to 
publish Mark Tw ain, Kanye West, 
or anyone else's works and call 
those works my own. 

In the physical world, we have 
(mostly) free speech (I have talked 
about this last semester.) However, 
in the virtual world, it seems that we 
do have completely free speech. 

I am not sure what the fuss is 
all about. I know I do not want 
my articles to be republished as 
someone else's and these are just 
the lowly opinion articles of some 
student. 

What I am failing to understand 
here how protecting online 
copyrights restricts my virtual free 
speech? I do not think that it does. 

Take a look at the first line of 
SOPA: "Nothing in this Act shall be 
construed to impose a prior restraint 
on free speech or the press protected 
under the First Amendment to the 
Constitution." (SOPA 2012) 

If you have a firm grasp on this 
subject or if you disagree with me, 
feel free to comment on the Current 
Sauce's online publication or to 
submit an article. 



We need writers! 



Our newspaper needs stories written by 
students. 

Come by our office, 227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every Monday at 6 p.m. We 
hope to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



Volunteering: Help 
others, help yourself 



Catherine Beverly 

Opinions Editor 




s 



The 

CurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

^atie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



omething I 
have 
always 
found astonishing 
about our 
generation is 
the utter lack 
of involvement. Now I am not 
referring to entertainment (such 
as sports or television), but I am 
focused solely on the community 
service side of involvement. 

This involvement involves 
participating in politics on a 
local and national scale, being an 
informed citizen, supporting local 
arts in your community, and even 
doing something as simple as, say, 
reading an editorial in the Current 
Sauce. 

It may come as a surprise to 
some, but these articles are attempts 
to reach out to the student body and 
make them care about something- 
anything. 

In an attempt to make my point 
connect, I will reference a song 
readers may recognize: "You gotta 
get it right while you got the time, 
'cause when you close your heart, 
you close your mind." Michael 
Jackson sang these lyrics in 1988, 
and they still ring true today. 

The town of Natchitoches is 
below the state poverty level. 
According to city-data.com, 
statistics show that 30 percent of 
Natchitoches residents are below 
the poverty level, and 86 percent 
of these cases involve families in 
single-parent homes. 

Nothing will ever be quite right 
about a community that closes its 
heart to those citizens who need a 
helping hand. While it may seem 
easier to sit back and watch the 



world spinning around you, it is not 
particularly fulfilling. 

Some of the most moving 
moments of my life have been 
the result of something I did to 
help someone else. Volunteering 
at the organization "Big Brothers, 
Big Sisters" let me see many 
children find their escapes from 
sometimes brutal home lives while 
the organization "Habitat for 
Humanity" provided me with a way 
to better my community and help 
families in need. 

According to bls.gov, 1,000 
fewer people volunteered in 20 1 
than they did in the previous year. 
While this may not seem like a huge 
drop, it is drastic when you consider 
the homes that were not built as 
quickly, the children who were left 
with no role models or the animals 
that sat alone in their kennels. 

Volunteering does not take much 
time out of your schedule. As few as 
three or four hours every weekend 
is enough to make a person's (or an 
animal's) life happier and healthier. 

Imagine what volunteering 
could do for someone else. And you 
thought you needed a college degree 
to change the world. Next time you 
are sitting alone in your dorm room, 
borer' • v- 

better u.c mis coautanmy. 

Some good places to start 
volunteering are: local veterinary 
clinics, shelters, on-campus clubs 
and organizations or at www. 
dosomething.org. "Do Something" 
gives people the chance to start up 
their own volunteering organization 
with nation-wide support, and it 
could be an opportunity to create 
start-up grants and scholarships. 

But remember: in order to 
change the world, you have to start 
with what you see in the mirror. 



SfcranS© 

BUT TRUE 

By Samantha Weaver 

• It was American ventriloquist and 
comedian Willie Tyler who made the 
following sage observation: "The 
reason lightning doesn't strike twice 
in the same place is that the same 
place isn't there the second time." 

• Even flight attendants have their 
own patron saint, as declared bv Pope 
Paul XXIII in 1962: Saint Bona of 
Pisa. 

• Many people believe that the 
Gutenberg Bible, which came from 
the presses of Johannes Gutenberg 
in the 1450s, is the first example of 
a printed book, but that's not true; it's 
the first book printed using movable 
type. The oldest known printed book 
is actually the "Diamond Sutra," 
which was printed in China more 
than 550 years before the Gutenberg 
Bible. 

• In many Middle Eastern cultures, 
it is traditional to celebrate a wed- 
ding with five events. The first is the 
engagement party, during which the 
bride-to-be changes clothes several 
times. When the bride and groom sign 
the marriage contract there is another 
party, again with numerous changes 
of clothing by the bride. The day 
before the wedding there is a henna 
party, during which the bride and oth- 
ers are painted with elaborate designs 
that are thought to ward off evil spir- 
its. The reception takes place after the 
wedding, and guests are often given 
five almond pieces, each piece sym- 
bolizing one of the sacred wedding 
wishes: health, happiness, wealth, 
longevity and fertility. Seven days 
after the wedding is the final celebra- 
tory event, known as sabaa, which is 
for women only and is analogous to 
the wedding shower we have in the 
West. 




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The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 



www.thecurrentsauce.com 



• 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
January 25, 2012 



64-61 

Last-second three lifts Demons past scrappy McNeese Cowboys 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

James Hulbin's game-winning 
tip at the buzzer didn't count. 
Thanks to Shamir Davis' sub- 
sequent 3 -pointer at the buzzer, 
it didn't matter, as Northwestern 
State escaped with a 64-61 South- 
land Conference basketball win Sat- 
urday at McNeese State. 

Hulbin tipped in what would have 
been a game-winner, but an obvious, 
and ultimately ruled inadvertent, 
whistle by a game official negated 
the basket. After three looks at the 
review monitor, officials gave NSU 
the ball underneath the Demons' 
basket with 1 .2 seconds put back on 
the clock. 

Louis Ellis tried to inbound the ball, 
but called timeout when he didn't 
find an open teammate. After going 
to their bench, NSU came out with 
a different plan as Ellis looked into 
the near corner, where Davis cut off 
a pair of picks by Gary Stewart and 
William Mosley, took the inbounds 
pass and drained a 3-pointer in front 
of the Demons bench to win the see- 
saw game. 

"They had the middle jammed up 
and we couldn't get the entry pass, 
so we called time out and (assistant) 
coach (Bill) Lewit drew up a play 
with a pick, and Shamir rubbed off 
it perfectly and knocked down the 
shot," said Mike McConathy, the 
Demons' 13th-year coach. 

Northwestern ( 1 0-9 overall, 3-2 
in the Southland) led by 14 in each 
half, but McNeese rallied to open a 
59-53 lead with 6:08 remaining. In a 
two-minute span, Mosley scored the 
last six of his team-high 1 6 points on 
a short jumper, two free throws and 
a transition dunk after rebounding at 
the other end to tie the game 59-59 
with two minutes left. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
The Demons beat McNeese 64-61. The team returns home tonight against Lamar University. 



McNeese (7- 1 0. 3-2 ) went up on a 
Patrick Richard basket, but Davis hit 
a driving layup with l : 1 5 to go to tie 
it at 61- all. Richard drove the lane 
with 40 seconds left but NSU forced 
McNeese's 24th turnover, knocking 
the ball out of bounds and giving the 
visitors the ball with a last-second 
chance to win. 

Mosley had 6 rebounds, with the 



third making him only the third play- 
er in school history to snag 1,000 
in a career. He added 4 steals and 
3 blocks while going 6-6 from the 
floor. Davis finished with 13 points 
while Ellis had 10. 

Richard led all scorers with 28, 
19 while leading McNeese's sec- 
ond-half rally. The Demons gath- 
ered themselves to recover down 



the stretch, outscoring the Cowboys 
1 1-2 over the final four minutes. 

''We got some stops defensively, 
and were able to get some transition 
baskets out of our defense. We also 
got the ball entered inside to Mos- 
ley after not doing that for most of 
the second half." said McConathy. 
"He wants the ball now. He's our 
yeoman. Part of the problem against 



zones is we're not getting it into him. 
When we did today we were a better 
team." 

The outcome snapped a two-game 
skid by the Demons heading into a 
pair of home games next Wednesday 
night against Lamar and next Satur- 
day against Southeastern Louisiana, 
two East Division foes. NSU moved 
into a tie for the East Division lead 
with the win. 

"It's big. We go from 2-0 to 2-2, 
and now we're 3-2 and back on top 
on our side, after a tough loss at San 
Antonio and one we let slip away 
(wasting a 17-point second-half lead 
against Central Arkansas). It felt like 
we were on a hump the last few days 
and now we're on the right side of 
it," said McConathy. 

After seemingly hav ing won the 
game on Hulbin's tip-in, only to hav e 
the officials huddle and repeatedly 
review the game tape without ex- 
plaining what they were looking for, 
McConathy was hopeful but nervous 
during the stoppage. 

"I was hoping for a foul, because 
he blew the whistle and started to 
raise his hand. But once they final- 
ly sorted out the situation, it came 
down to making our decision how to 
score, and our young men had to ex- 
ecute it. Louis Ellis calling time out 
on our first inbounds attempt was a 
smart and game-winning play, just 
like James Hulbin made what should 
have been a game-winning tip-in 
that didn't count," said McConathy. 

"'We lost one in pretty bizarre 
fashion earlier this year on a banked- 
in 3-pointer at the buzzer in double 
overtime up at Louisiana Tech. and 
we won one in a pretty odd way 
today," he said. "Our guys showed 
some toughness in making the plays 
to win - twice." 




Jimmie 
Walker 

Editor-in- 
Chief 



Dynomite: Sending 
death threats through 
social media 

Social media sites such as 
Twitter have made the gap 
between our athletics heroes 
and the rest of the world as w ide as 
a QWERTY keyboard. 

You can literally engage in a 
conversation with your favorite ce- 
lebrity in 140 characters or less per 
tweet. This is especially the case 
when fans of successful football 
teams praise players via tweet for 
their dominance on the field during 
the playoffs. 

Tebow's performance conjured 
9,420 tweets per second after he 
completed the game-winning touch- 
down pass in overtime against the 
Pittsburgh Steelers. 

49ers receiver Kyle Williams 
found himself on the opposite spec- 
trum of this social phenomenon. He 
became an easy target for verbal 
abuse by angry, heartbroken fans. 

Williams became a worldwide 
trending topic within minutes, as 
tweets directed toward him became 
more violent. One twitter user 
hoped Williams would die in his 
sleep. Another wished death on him, 
his wife and kid. Luckily, Williams 
is not married and doesn't have a 
kid. 

For rest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 




0% 



There's strong, Then there's Army Strong, By enrolling in Army ROTC as a nursing student at Northwestern State 
University of Louisiana, you will learn valuable leadership skills. After graduation, you will have an opportunity to care 
for Soldiers and their families as an Army Nurse at one of many world-class Army medical facilities. And lead others as 
an Armv Officer 





III 1 1 





u r rent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, February 1, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



wwm nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 15 



NSU to award unprecedented number of scholarships 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity President Dr. Randall J. 
Webb announced the avail- 
ability of an unprecedented 
number of new scholarships for cur- 
rent and incoming students during a 
media event Monday. 

Thanks to recent major gifts to the 
university, the number of scholar- 
ships Northwestern State can award 
has risen 125 percent over the past 
five years and the value of those 
scholarships has incr eased more 
than 1 00 percent. 

Northwestern State has benefit- 
ted from significant growth in the 
overall creation of privately funded 
scholarships, with the value of to- 
tal scholarship funds from private 
sources rising over 1 43 percent over 
the past five years. 

Northwestern State can now 
award the largest number and great- 
er value of privately funded schol- 
arships in the history of the school, 
Webb said. 

"Students who can obtain funding 
through TOPS and privately funded 
scholarships will make a tremen- 
dous difference," Webb said, citing 
the bequest of the late Mary Rives 
Gallaspy as one of the most signifi- 
cant gifts. "This highly generous gift 
has been transformational." 

Webb introduced the first two 
recipients of scholarships created 
through the Gallaspy estate, Emily 



O'Glee, a senior at Haughton High 
School, and Kirk Allen of Haynes- 
ville, a sophomore at Northwestern 
State pursuing a degree in industrial 
engineering technology. O'Glee, 
who plans to major in mathemat- 
ics, is the first recipient of the Het- 
tie McMullen Fincher Scholarship 
in Mathematics. Allen is the first 
recipient of the Mary R. Gallaspy 
Scholarship. 

"This helps more than most peo- 
ple realize," Allen said, adding that 
the funds helped defray the cost of 
books and other expenses. 

"This is a great opportunity and 
I*m even more excited about attend- 
ing Northwestern," said O'Glee, 
who was accompanied by her moth- 
er. Brandy. 

Gallaspy, a 1946 graduate of 
Northwestern State College, was a 
teacher and businesswoman from 
DeSoto Parish whose bequest in- 
cluded a monetary gift, as well as 
property located in the Haynesville 
Shale. The Fincher Scholarship hon- 
ors Gallaspy's aunt, who graduated 
from Louisiana Normal, as North- 
western State was then known, in 
1908. 

In honor of the new scholar- 
ships and scholarship recipients, the 
Northwestern State columns will be 
lit purple this evening. Viewers can 
watch video highlights of today's 
announcement on the Northwestern 
State YouTubc channel at youtube. 
com/north westernstate . 




Emily O'Glee of Haughton, center, 

"Because of the increase in the 
number of scholarships over the 
past five years, we are helping more 
than twice the students that we have 
in the past," said Drake Owens, ex- 
ecutive director of the Northwestern 
State Foundation. 

Dean of Students Dr. Chris Mag- 
gio said that the additional funding 



was awarded the Hettie McMullen Fincher Scholarship 

helps with recruiting initiatives and 
with retention of students. 

"We want to take care of our stu- 
dents, our incoming and continuing 
students," Maggio said. "We encour- 
age prospective students to apply for 
admissions and then apply for schol- 
arships early." 

The deadline to apply for scholar- 



ships at Northwestern State is March 
1. High school juniors and seniors 
who have applied for enrollment 
should apply for Northwestern State 
Foundation/Leadership and alumni 
scholarships. For more information, 
visit recruiting.nsula.edu and click 
on the Leadership/Foundation link. 
For those applying to Northwestern 



Photo supplied by News Bureau 

State for the first time, the link will 
be at the end of the Apply Now pro- 
cess. 

For more information, visit nsu- 
la.edu and click on the Prospective 
Students link or contact Jana Lucky, 
director of University Recruiting by 
calling (318) 357-4503 or e-mailing 
luckyj@nsula.edu. 



Fruge ends reign as Miss LOB Saturday 




Last year's winner, Ruth Fruge, will pass on the 
title of Lady of the Bracelet this Saturday in the 
54th annual LOB pageant. LOB will start at 7:00 
p.m. this Saturday in A.A. Frederick's Auditorium. 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

75759° 



Thursday 

72755° 



Friday 

70752° 




Correction: Renovation Story 



It has come to my attention that 
an article written by a reporter had 
information that did not pertain to 
the university. 

The article was intended to give 
information about ongoing and fu- 
ture construction projects on this 



campus. The representative from 
Bernhard was not clear with the 
questions asked, so it led to a misun- 
derstanding. The reporter referred 
to Northwestern State University 
as "NSU," and the representative 
thought he was talking about Nich- 



olls State University, as they also 
refer to the school as "NSU." How- 
ever, Bernhard is working with 
Northwestern State University on 
renovation projects. Be sure to read 
upcoming Current Sauce issues for 
more information about the campus. 




200 protesters arrested in Oak- 
land: Occupy Wall Street protesters 
attempted to take over City Hall in 
downtown Oakland, CA. Tear gas 
was used to quell the protesters and 
four were injured. 



Marijuana legalization sent to bal- 
lot in Washington State: The group 
Approach New Washington gath- 
ered 278,000 signatures in order to 
legalize marijuana. This is more than 
enough signatures to put the matter 
on the November ballot. 

Senate refuses to raise debt ceiling: 

Last Thursday, the Senate rejected a 
proposition to increase the debt ceil- 



ing by 1.2 trillion dollars. Had this 
proposition passed, it would have 
halted much debate on the issue until 
after the presidential election. 

Reward offered for info on shot 
seals: Environmental group Sea 
Shepherd Conservation Society is 
offering $10,000 for any informa- 
tion about the the shooting of seven 
sea lions in Washington State. 



NSU Police 
Blotter 

Reports from the NSU 
police station from 
Jan 24-28 

Jan 24 

7:49 a.m. Missing cellphone 
reported 

11:02 a.m. - Student Union west, 
illegally parked cars 

2:27 p.m. - Heavy traffic, sent of- 
ficer to direct 

7:03 p.m. - Vehicle collision at 
UP1 

Jan 25 

6:53 a.m. - Vehicle stalled in the 



middle of road on campus 

7:00 a.m. - Unknown vehicle found 
on campus 

7:15 a.m. Smith s Towing called to 
have vehicle removed 

7:24 a.m. Kappa Sig house had 
unkown vehicle parked in driveway, 
requested it be moved 

10:52 a.m. - Subject complained 
about vehicles parked in the fire 
lane at columns 

Jan 26 

2:22 p.m. - Collision at Iberville, 
inidividual s leg injured 



2:57 p.m. - Ashes from fire on cars 
near farm area, no damage 

6:21 p.m. - Individual reported so- 
liciting in parking lot of library 

Jan 27 

2:58 p.m. Archie 's Towing towed 
away car with out of date tag at 
BCM 

10:35 a.m. - Individual called to re- 
port a Jeep parked with unattended 
children 

Jan 28 

10:27 p.m. - Loud noise and funny 
smell reported coming from room in 
Columns 



2:40 p.m. - Student reports ash all 10:55 Summons issued for room 
over his car, vehicle near farm area in Columns, underage drinking 
fears damage reported 



Saturday 

64743° 



Sunday 

60740° 



Monday 

63740° 



Tuesday 

87761° 









Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
February 1, 2012 




Submitted Photo 



Two NSU students enjoy the outdoors in downtown Natchitoches by Cane River. 



Students find ways to have fun 



Janitza Vasquez 

Sauce Reporter 

Behind the steel magnolias 
of historic Natchitoches is 
a place that is bursting with 
entertaining activities for students 
to enjoy. 

That may be hard to believe, 
but new businesses and some 
innovations by students are 
allowing young adults to get the 



most out of attending school in 
Natchitoches. 

The newest restaurant addition 
is Orange Leaf, a yogurt shop that 
opened last fall on Keyser Avenue 
near Wal-Mart. 

Brielle Mallet, a sophomore 
nursing major believes that the 
local eatery provides an interesting 
atmosphere for students. 

"Orange Leaf is a nice place that 
allows you to hangout with your 



h lends. The yujjail is inexpensive, 
and 11 " clfer a free rewards card 
that can iielp you get free treats and 
cheaper yogurt," Mallet said. 

Students can also enjoy live 
entertainment at other restaurants 
such as the Landing located on 
Front Street on various days of the 
week. 

"The Landing's Sunday 
Champagne Jazz Brunch 
is fantastic. It's the perfect 



environment to chat with friends 
while indulging with great food and 
drinks," senior graphic design major 
Allison Roberts said. 

For students that do not want 
to spend money to have fun, 
things can be challenging, but not , 
impossible. 

Shana Lee, an elementary 
education major said the key to 
having fun is hanging out with the 
right people. 

"There isn't much that the city 
offers that fall within a college 
student's budget. You have to 
be creative, and a big part of 
determining the amount of fun you 
have is the people you hang out 
with." Lee said. 

For Natchitoches native Hunter 
Smith, being outdoors is all the 
entertainment he needs. 

"I love going to the Natchitoches 
Shooting Range. It's a fun place 
that offers instruction on shooting, 
different types of guns and archery," 
Smith said. 

Smith added that fishing and 
spending time at the lake is also 
something fun to do. 

Taylor Graves, event coordinator 
for the Natchitoches Event Center, 
explained that there is always some 
event planned in Natchitoches, 
but most times students never 
find out about the events. A little 
investigation is required to find out 
things to do. 

"Some type of festival or event 
happens every month. The next 
one coming up is the Krewe of 
Dionysus Mardi Gras parade on 
Feb. 1 2," Graves said. 

For more information about 
things to do in Natchitoches, visit 
www.natchitoches.net. 



NSU cheerleaders host clinic for kids 



Membrie Gibbons 

Staff Reporter 

NSU cheerleaders held their 
yearly winter Cheer and 
Dance Clinic from 9 a.m. 
until 2 p.m. this past Saturday. 
Approximately 30 children ranging 
from Pre-K through the 12th grade 
particpated and learned cheers, 
stunting techniques and dance 
routines from the NSU squad 
members. 

The clinic not only benefits 
the children of the community by 



providing them with the opportunity 
to learn cheerleading skills from 
a collegiate cheer squad, but it 
also helps the cheerleaders raise 
money to pay for expenses they 
encounter throughout the football 
and basketball seasons. 

Jana Lucky, sponsor for the NSU 
cheer squad, noted the benefits of 
the cheer clinic. 

"This clinic is a great outreach 
program to the children of 
the community, and aids the 
cheerleaders in paying for things 
like the travel expenses for the away 



games they cheer at," Lucky said. 

Captain of the NSU cheer squad, 
Amy Dodson, enjoyed the clinic. 

"We [the NSU cheerleaders] 
have so much fun doing this clinic 
not only because it's fun for the 
kids, but also because it makes us 
appreciate our spots on the squad 
more. We see these young children 
looking up to us like celebrities, 
and we remember being them at 
one point and all the work we put 
in to get on the squad in the first 
place," Dodson, a senior elementary 
education major said. 

While the clinic officially 



ended at 2 p.m., the children 
who participated in the clinic 
were invited to cheer with the 
cheerleaders at the basketball game 
against Southeastern to enjoy the 
game and perform their routine at 
halftime. 

The basketball court was full 
of children of all ages as the 
children showed the Demon fans 
in the stands the skills they learned 
that morning. Their halftime 
performance was concluded with 
the NSU cheer squad and clinic 
participants dancing to the Demon 
Fight Song. 



Improve eating habits with simple tips 



Alexis Reliford 

Staff Reporter 

When it comes to food, 
college students love it. 
Whether it's fast food, 
university grub or mom's home- 
cooked meals, food is number one 
on the list of priorities. 

Although between balancing 
classes, multiple activities and a 
social life, healthy eating often 
takes a backseat. 

"I don't think my diet is very 
healthy. Everyday I eat at The 
Grill on campus, but technically, 
nothing's grilled, it's fried," 
freshman Rodney Haynes said. 

According to Connie Jones. NSU 
professor and registered dietitian, 
the priorities of students' and their 
eating habits are wrong. 

While she recognizes that 
healthy food can be expensive, she 
believes it's worth the money. 

"It is very important for students 
to eat healthy. Eating healthy has 
various short-term and long-term 
effects including the strengthening 
of the immune system, increased 
personal performance and the 
reduction of health problems such 
as diabetes," Jones said. 

"Even if I wanted to start eating 
healthy, I have no idea where to 
start," freshman Jocelyn Beaudion 
said. 

Jones suggests developing healthy 
habits. 



Fats, Oils, Sugar & Salt 

Use in smalt amounts 



Meat & Alternatives 

3 servings 

('h serving should come from dairy or 
other htgh caterum product) 




Fruit & Vegetables 

2 servings each 



Rice & Alternatives 

5 - 7 servings 

(2 3 servings shot** be wfwte-grairj products; 



"Start with small changes. Get 
five servings a day of fruits and 
vegetables, swap one sugary drink 
per day for water and limit meat 
portions and white foods such as 
pasta, bread and rice," Jones said. 

Jones also recommends that 
students get at least three servings 
of milk a day to insure healthy 
bones and teeth. 

"Even if it's chocolate, some 
milk is better than no milk," Jones 
added. 

Snacks can be good or bad, and 
she suggests, "stacking the deck in 
your favor" to students, to satisfy 
cravings that occur randomly. 
Instead of skipping meals, students 



should pack quick, healthy snacks 
to munch on throughout the day. 
Healthy snacks include fruits 
such as apples and bananas, nuts, 
oatmeal, granola bars and popcorn. 

"Good choices are available, 
but self-education is necessary. The 
next most important thing after 
eating healthy is to get active," 
Jones added. 

Moderate exercise implemented 
with healthy eating has been proven 
to have satisfactory outward and 
inward results. 

The WRAC has several fitness 
classes ranging from Zumba -an 
energetic, Latin dance-inspired 
fitness program- hip hop dance, 



yoga, pilates and more. 

The classes are of no charge to 
NSU students ,and they provide a 
fun way to stay active. 

Crystalyn Whitaker, a senior 
English education major is thinking 
about picking up one of the 
WRAC's classes to get started on 
her New Year's resolutions. 

"I can't think of a better way to 
start my mornings than with a good 
shower, breakfast, and workout. 
I'm excited about the hip hop class. 
These are dances I do all the time, 
but maybe I'D learn something new. 
I love to dance," Whitaker said. 

Now, what are you waiting for? 
Make the decision today to start 
living a more healthy lifestyle! 



Shopping in Natchitoches: 
Challenge for savvy shopper 




Jacob 
Labutka 

Fashion 
Columnist 



Millions have flocked to 
cities like New York in 
pursuit of the latest fashion 
trends. Tins has been showcased in 
popular culture through characii...; 
such as Carrie Bradshaw who 
storm the metropolis to find love, 
success and the trendiest pair of 
shoes. Unfortunately for us in 
Natchitoches, there are fewer 
opportunities to find "the one", 
become known for who you are and 
find a cute pair of flats. 

I'm not saying that Natchitoches 
will debut the latest Prada bag 
showcased in Milan (and happens 
to cost as much as your tuition). 
However, there are a few hidden 
stores in Natchitoches where the 
stylish shopper can find more than 
just a T-shirt from Wal-mart. 

Along Keyser Avenue are 
several women's clothing stores 
including Cato and Maurice's 
that sell women's and plus sizes. 
Shopping with the girls has led me 
to conclude that the professional 
woman or the se baby do 11 
wearing diva (dc nding on your 
mood) can find something at these 
stores to don. 

For the shopper with a shoe 
fetish, Natchitoches has a Shoe 
Department for the brand name 
(Nike, Adidas, etc.) shopper. 
However, for those of you with 



fewer financial assets, I suggest 
strolling through Payless Shoe 
Source. 

In the shopping center adjacent 
to Wal-mart is Rue 2 1 which 
specifically sells to the broke 
college student. Right next door 
is Sally's Beauty Supply whose 
products helped me go tlirough my 
2011 plptinum blond phase. 

Befoiw i list any more potential 
stores, I must inform my readers 
about the clothing stores on Front 
Street. While these stores have 
some potential merchandise, the 
outfits sold at the majority of these 
retailers are meant for the individual 
who has long since graduated 
from college (and has the checking 
account to prove it). 

Last, but not least, is the 
store most of my friends forget 
Natchitoches even has. It can 
be classified beyond the label of 
"store" to the "almost department 
store" that sells everything but your 
living room couch. This diamond in 
the rough is Stage. 

Compared to many of the 
Stage stores I have shopped in, 
Natchitoches store has a decent 
selection in every department. 
From the clearance rack shopper 
to the individual who wants to "get 
happy" (which happens to be a 
wonderful smelling fragrance by 
Clinique), Stage has something for 
everyone. 

I will not perpetuate the illusion 
that finding a cute outfit in this town 
is not hard. I merely inform you 
that it is possible to find something 
new when a trip to Alexandria or 
Shreveport is not possible. 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"The Grey" 

Rated R 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"One for the Money" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 7:00 9:30pm 

"Red Tails" 

Rated PG-13 
4:00 p.m. 6:40 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Contraband" 

Rated R 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"Joyful Noise" 

Rated PG-13 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Underworld: 
Awakening" 

Rated R 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 




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^ f 




Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
February 1, 2012 



Rants: 
Got to 

make that 
money 




T ^urrentSauce 




Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



I have been looking for a job 
now for the past month and a 
half. While I listen to reports 
of an improving economy and the 
creation of jobs, I wonder why my 
broke behind cannot get in on the 
action. 

Given the past month or so 
of applications with no answer, I 
have some grievances with the job 
processes of a post-industrialized 
society. 

I could always work with a 
relative or an old friend perhaps. 
However, I thought this was 
supposed to be a free market 
society, where anyone doing his or 
her best would benefit that society. 
I thought I could have any job I 
wanted as long as I was qualified. 

Nope. 

So why is it that I am only able 
to get a job through what my family 
and friends have done? 

Such a trend resembles 
feudalism, or even communism 
because my potential paycheck is 
limited to certain sources pertaining 
to family ties. 

This leads straight into the 
second qualm: experience. On 
Craigslist, if you do not have a 
minimum of three years as a waiter, 
in transportation, salesrifiaftTtenance 
or any other domestic trade then 
you can start heading on down to 
the Welfare office or start flipping 
burgers. 

Please note that if my condition 
does not improve, I'll choose the 
latter. My dignity will expire in a 
few weeks. 

On Natchitoches' Craigslist 
website and in its classifieds, 
there is little or no mention of 
qualifications such as "must have 
bachelor's or master's" or even 
"vo-tech desired." However, what 
they do ask for is a friendly outlook 
on life and an ability to play nicely 
with others. As if any of that 
"friendly person" malarkey actually 
matters especially in this cynical 
and individualistic era. 

This leads to my third and final 
qualm: online applications. Not only 
is a friendly disposition required- 
although it should really be implied 
rather than stated-but many of these 
employers ask that you fill out the 
application online. 

Online applications take the 
personal aspect of applying for a 
job completely out of the equation. 
You have to wait for the interview 
for all of that. By the time (or if) 
you get an interview, you are so 
stressed out and frustrated that it 
takes restraint and control to be a 
"friendly person." 

Good thing they mentioned it, I 
suppose. 

But maybe by the time that you, 
dear reader, come across this article 
I will have succeeded in my quest 
for legal and gainful employment. 

I wish all of you good luck in 
finding a job within your interest 
as you face the hurdles I mentioned 
above. 



Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 

Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Contact us at: Delivery Personnel 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 




We need writers! 



Our newspaper needs 
stories written by stu- 
dents. 

Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every Mon- 
day at 6 p.m. We 

hope to hear from 
you^ 

- Current Sauce staff 



Pulling the wool from America's eyes 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
Editor 



lthough I 
have many 
issues with the education system in 
America, something that really gets 
my goat is that most of us have no 
idea what is going on. 

What I mean is that there are so 
many events across the world, good 
and bad, and we seem to be the 
last people to hear about them^We^ 
cannot blame this on inaccessibility , 
(in most cases)' because we are 
almost always on the Internet in 
some way or another. 

The most I ever knew about 
current events was learned through 
a mandatory class assignment for a 
high school class. At that time, my 
idea of an "important global event" 



was something a few states away. 

This disconnected state 
stems from the size and location 
of our country. While smaller 
countries have the ability to cross 
international borders within hours, 
many citizens of the United States 
have never even traveled halfway 
across this country. 

My opinions articles are usualjy 
focused on current political or 
social problems because I feel that 
the student population should be' •'• 
aware of what is ahead of-them, 
or at lea^t of what some balding . 
old man thinks should be ahead of 
them. 

Outside of Internet memes and 
Facebook posts, there are many 
important things that are going on 
in the world. For instance, did you 
know that over 5,000 people have 
died in an uprising in Syria since 
last March? For me to say that this 



information was a surprise to me is 
an understatement. 

Let's try a current event closer to 
home. Many of the GOP candidates 
for the 201 2 presidential election 
are firmly anti-abortion, and some 
of them are even crossing the barrier 
into being anti-contraception. This 
constant struggle to take away or 
change the rights of the American 
public is ludicrous. The funny thing 
about rights is that there should 
be no vote on whether or not we 
should have them. 

While this may not seem like a 
big deal to those who are pro-life, 
imagine the consequences when 
millions of people with no form of 
contraception continue to have sex 
(because you know they will). 
Imagine a doubled population, 
doubled prices and resorting to 
any means necessary to keep your 
family afloat. The unemployment 



rate would rise drastically, pushing 
the gap between the rich and the 
poor to an all-time high. This 
economic disparity leaves huge 
families of poor, undereducated 
people to make up the populace of 
the United States. 

While this may seem extreme 
to some people, it follows a logical 
pattern that is easy to see. 

If you look at any history book: 
overpopulation is never a good 
thing. 

Next time you are surfing the 
Internet on your smartphone, 
download one of many free news ' 
applications. A few minutes out 
of your day can make you a more 
informed citizen. It's your future 
they are deciding and your fate they 
are lobbying over, so get involved. 

Nowadays, all it takes is a click 
of a button. 




WOT'RE (MANX* ItMTO" US 



Ccufs.A PU1*£ 



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ahitwith^TJcai'tBreak the Heart That 
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and when 7 

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"You v* Really Got a Hold on Me" 
and 'Gosns !d a Go-Go" 

5 . Who wrote and sang "Stack m the 
Kiddle" aaad when? 

6. Shep and The Limeoies are best 
remembered for what song? 



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Trivia 

tCSt byHfij 

— — -Rodriguez 



1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: 
WhkhyouShgroisp's slogan is 'Learn 
by dang"? 

2. TELEVISION: Who was the Ger- 
man comfrandarg of Stalag 13 m TVs 
1I Hcsan , s Heroes'? 

3. U.S. GOVERNMENT Which 
state dad Harry Byrd represent in die 
U.S. Senate for 32 years? 

4. INVENTORS: Who was She 
inventor of die fast practical process 
trfptaograpfay? 

5. MYTHOLOGY: Who was the 
Greek goddess Persephone? 

6. HISTORY: What did Jack Ruby, 
who killed JFK assassin. Lee Harvey 
Os wald do Sir a Irving 7 

7. SPORTS: When was die Stanley 
Oap first a warded: 1 

8. THEATER: Tennessee Wflhanns 
wonaPHnttzerPriafbrwhKhoneof 
his plays in liMS 1 * 

9. GEOGRAPHY: Theory of Carta- 
gena. Spam, lies next to which body of 
water? 

10. EXPLORERS. What was the 
of polar explorer Roald 



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Taesha 
Johnson 

Practicuum 
Student 



Evolution at 
its best 

One grand thing about 
humans is we're constantly 
evolving. It's a gradual 
process. On a molecular level, right 
down to our hair, nail and skin 
cells, we change and we evolve into 
something different than before. 

We're not blanketed by the same 
skin cells that we had 10 years ago. 
We don't have the same hair and 
nails that we did the day we were 
born. We change and grow out of 
some things and into others. 

Although biology is an 
interesting aspect in explaining how 
people change, I've found that as 
we age our perspectives undergo 
important changes as well. 

Perspectives tend to be the line 
that separates those that excel and 
those that fail. 

As we go through life, we gather 
experience and with that experience 
we may learn that we want to keep 
the views we have, revise them or 
just do away with them altogether 
,and that's ok. 

We have the right lu diange uui 
minds. It doesn't matter how drastic 
that change is to what your view 
was before. 

Do you have the same 
perspective on your life as you did 
five years ago? three years ago? Do 
you still see the world in the same 
way? 

Sometimes it takes a 
conversation with someone raised 
differently from you. Sometimes it 
takes you making bad decisions or 
taking a leap of faith and stepping 
out of a comfort zone (not all 
transitions are as effortless as 
shedding hair and skin cells). 

The beauty of this is that we 
can become better people. Perhaps 
the view you have of yourself now 
cripples you or prevents you from 
excelling. Is your view of yourself a 
negative one? We have that choice 
to adopt new views or even re- 
create them. 

Remember that change is critical 
to growth. 

One thing that I have learned 
thus far is that change is inevitable, 
sometime scary and uncomfortable 
,but most times necessary. 



Answers to last 
week's King 
Crossword 
puzzle 



— King Crossword — 

Answers 
Solution time: 21 mins 



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ooorjoooa nous 
snransiHiso heiog 

BOB QBBBBE 
00E1HB DDG1Q 
□BOB BBBBBBB 
QBE DaaaH u:y 

f3EH3BBED 

QQQa BBBQB 









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The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submission - become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
February 1, 2012 



Demons tame Lions 55-38 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Northwestern State kept visit- 
ing Southeastern Louisiana 
scoreless in the game's final 
9:15 Saturday afternoon as the De- 
mons held the Lions to the lowest 
score by an NSU opponent since 
1971 in a 55-38 Southland Confer- 
ence basketball victory Saturday at 
Prather Coliseum. 

NSU ended the game on a 19-2 
run pulling away from a brief 36-all 
score with 12:19 left. Southeastern 's 
only score afterward came on a dis- 
puted goaltending call with 9:16 re- 
maining. The Lions missed their last 
1 1 shots from the floor, went 0-for-3 
on free throws and suffered 4 turn- 
overs while being blanked 17-0. 
It was the lowest point total by an 

NSU foe since a 25-21 double 
overtime homecourt loss in 1971 
to a nationally-ranked Louisiana- 
Lafayette team before both pro- 
grams moved up to Division I. The 
Demons held the ball in that game, 
which came 14 years before the shot 
clock was instituted in 1985. 

Northwestern (12-9 overall, 5-2 in 
the Southland) won its third straight 
game while snapping a six-game 
win streak in the series by Southeast- 
ern (8-11,2-5). 

The Lions shot only 28 percent 
(16-58) from the field and were 2-9 
on free throws while making 21 
turnovers. The Demons, 12th nation- 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
William Mosely rejects shot by the opponent. Mosely had six blocks in 
win over Southeastern. 



ally with a 9.1 steals average, had 13 
swipes, and blocked 12 shots, nearly 
double their 6.7 average that is sixth 
in the country. 

"The key to the game was get- 
ting up in the passing lanes, and for 
the first 10:43 of the second half we 
weren't doing that." said 13th-year 



Demons' coach Mike McConathy. a 
33-year coaching veteran. "We did 
a phenomenal job over the last 9: 16. 
I've been in this game for a long 
time, and I've never seen something 
quite like that. 

"The game plan was to get up on 
top and take them out of what they 
wanted to run offensively. We had 



East Division 

Northwestern State 5-2 

McNeese State 5-2 
Lamar University 4-3 
Southeastern 2-5 
Central Arkansas 2-5 
Nicholls State 1-7 



SOUTHLAND 



West Division 

UT Arlington 7-0 
UT San Antonio 6-1 
Stephen F. Austin 5-2 
Corpus Chris ti 3-5 
Sam Houston 2-5 
Texas State 1 -6 



ACROSS 

1 Persian 

sprite 
5 False god 
9 Quitters' 

get-together 

12 Tied 

13 Pond 
organism 

14 Young 
fellow 

15 Ceremonial 
greeting 

17 Spoon- 
bender 
Geller 

18 Soldiers 

19 Occurrence 

21 Yours truly 

22 "Get lost!" 
24 Ellen of 

"Juno" 

27 Cattle call 

28 First-rate 

31 Mess up 

32 Recede 

33 Raw rock 

34 Coral 
structure 

36 In medias — 

37 Winter fore 
cast 

38 Presbyter 

40 The x in 
"2x4" 

41 Hiawatha's 
craft 

43 Get along 
somehow 

47 Cage piece 

48 Swift pooch 
51 Oklahoma 



King Crossword 



1 



12 



13 



16 



22 23 



24 


25 


26 




31 








34 






35] 


HI 




41 


42 






47 








51 




- 


1 


54 









32 



36 



39 







10 


11 


















20 












28 




29 


30 




33 






[37 









43 



48 



52 



55 



49 



50 




53 



56 





city 




life? 


30 Stitch 


52 


Family 


8 


Procrastin- 


35 Sitcom 




member 




ator's reply 


waitress 


53 


Party pooper 


9 


The Marcels' 


37 Churchly 


54 


Has 




biggest hit 


councils 




permission 


10 


Deserve 


39 Impression- 


55 


Green or 


11 


Rewrite 


ist Edgar 




Rogen 


16 


Mimic 


40 "Humbug!" 


56 


Fill till full 


20 


Cistern 


41 Pull an all- 






22 


Uninfluenc- 


nighter 


DOWN 




ed? 


42 Verdi opera 


1 


Saucy 


23 


Corn 


43 Folklore 


2 


Always 




castoffs 


44 Emanation 


3 


Start over 


24 


Apiece 


45 Summertime 


4 


1040 


25 


Is pluralized 


pest 




information 


26 


Wisconsin 


46 Advantage 


5 


Prohibits 




city 


49 Regret 


6 


Matterhorn, 


27 


Unembellish- 


50 Tolkien tree 




for one 




ed 


creature 


7 


Time of your 


29 


Expert 





a nice game plan by Coach (Jacob) 
Spielbauer and the kids bought in 
and competed at a high level," he 
said. 

NSU senior center William Mosley 
had 14 points. 12 rebounds. 6 blocks 
and 3 steals. He climbed two spots 
to 17th on the all-time NCAA career 
blocked shots list, raising his total to 
421. He was the only double-digit 
scorer for the Demons, who were 
substandard offensively themselves, 
making only 36 percent overall and 
only 1 1 of their 23 free throws, while 
going 2 of 14 on 3-pointers. 

"If we play defense like we did 
today, we'll find ways to win the 
game. There's a huge difference in 
the way we're defending now and 
the way we defended in our last loss 
at UTSA (80-62 on Jan. 18), said 
McConathy. 

SLU. which dropped to 0-10 on the 
road, got 12 oints and 8 rebounds 
from Elgin Bailey. The Demons 
moved to 10-0 when holding their 
opposition under 70 points. 

Northwestern wraps up the first 
half of the Southland race on the 
road at Central Arkansas next 
Wednesday, then comes home next 
Saturday for their third home game 
in four outings, against Texas A&M- 
Corpus Christi on Demon Basketball 
Reunion Day. 



— 



Got the best 
chili in town? 

Prove it Feb. 4 in 
Prather Coliseum 

at the Demon 
basketball game 



For more information, caii 
318-357-4268 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
The Lady Demons are ranked sixth on the coaches' and SID's polls. 



Expectations set high 
for Demon softball 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Second-baseman Cali Burke 
earned her name on to the 
2012 Pre-Season All-SLC 
First-Team and pitcher Kelee 
Grimes was named to the All-SLC 
Second-Team, as the Northwestern 
State softball team was tabbed for a 
mid-table finish in the conference by 
the coaches and SID's, announced 
on Thursday. 

The Lady Demons were projected 
to finish sixth in both polls, and re- 
ceived a first place vote by the SLC 
coaches. NSU finished sixth last 
season, earning a trip to the SLC 
Tournament for the first time in five 
years. 

"We want to win the conference 
and the conference tournament. 
Those are the two main goals that 
we have this season," said head 
coach Donald Pickett. "We have 
the talent to accomplish it. We just 
have to continue to work hard, put 
ourselves in good situations and ex- 
ecute when we need to." 

Texas State was tabbed for a 
first-place finish in both polls after 



winning the 2011 SLC Tournament. 
A&M-Corpus Christi and Texas- 
Arlington were predicted second 
and third in the Coaches' Poll, and 
flopped positions in the SID's Poll. 
McNeese State, UTSA and NSU 
were next placed in order in both 
polls to round out the SLC Tourna- 
ment qualifying spots. 

The SLC league office also an- 
nounced the 2012 Pre-Season All- 
Tournament teams, naming two 
Lady Demons to the squads. 

Burke, a sophomore from Mes- 
quite, Texas and Dr. John Horn HS, 
got her career started in 201 1 with a 
bang, hitting for a .302 average and 
16 RBI. She earned honors on the 
2011 All-Louisiana Collegiate Soft- 
ball Team and the All-SLC Second- 
Team. Burke posted a 10-game hit- 
ting streak during conference play, 
and registered 13 multi-hit games. 

Grimes, a right-hander from 
Pineville and Pineville HS, is com- 
ing off a breakthrough year where 
she earned her name on the 20 1 1 



For rest of story: 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Elqutub honored as scholar-athlete 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Former Demon linebacker Yaser Elqutub was honored last Saturday at the Demons' basket- 
ball game for receiving the National Football Foundation award. Pictured are (left to right) 
athletic director Greg Burke; Yaser Elqutub; Carrie Crowell, head academic coordinator; 
and T. Davina McClain, director of the Scholars' College and associate professor. Elqutub, 
a Scholars' College graduate, walked on for the Demon football team in 2007. He started at 
linebacker his junior and senior years. 




u rrent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, February 8, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 1^, 



'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest' opens tonight at CAPA 



Contessa D. Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

Beginning Wednesday, the 
NSU Theatre and Dance de- 
partment will present One 
Flew Over the Cuckoo s Nest which 
is based on the best-selling novel 
by Ken Kasey. The play is set in an 
asylum where a not-so-insane man 
causes chaos in a string of rebellious 
acts to challenge the authority of a 
corrupt nurse. 

The "Cuckoo's Nest" is the first 
production that the university has 
directed since the late 1970s. 

Pia Wyatt, an associate professor 
of Theatre and Dance, will direct the 
play. Wyatt has been a professor at 
NSU for nine years and has directed 
thirteen plays. 

Wyatt expressed the play's appeal 
and its significance to the audience. 

"The play is uplifting, funny, 
a message of hope [andj a great op- 
portunity for students to get lost in 
the theatre," Wyatt said. 

Wyatt believes that it is more re- 
alistic to watch a live performance 
of the play versus watching a film 
adaptation because the play is more 
relatable to students when they see 



it live. 

Wyatt acknowledges that some 
students will view the play and the 
matter of mental illness as entertain- 
ment, but others who may be affected 
on a deeper level. 

"It depends on the student," Wyatt 
said. "No matter what the cost, we 
must still struggle against conformi- 
ty, oppression and totalitarianism." 

Randa Lopez, a junior communi- 
cations major, is looking forward to 
seeing the play for the first time. 

Although Lopez has seen clips of 
the film version of the play in classes, 
she wants to see how NSU students 
will pull off the asylum setting. Lo- 
pez has seen other NSU plays such as 
as Chicago, and she believes that the 
production will be a success. 

"NSU always does amazing shows, 
and [They're] all pretty spot on," Lo- 
pez said. 

The cast prepared for the produc- 
tion by rehearsing six days a week for 
three hours a night. 

"Cuckoo's Nest" will be per- 
formed Feb. 8-11, and 15-17, at 7:30 
p.m. and Feb. 12, at 2 p.m. in Theatre 
West. 

Admission is free to all NSU and 
LSMSA students with a current 
student I.D. f 




Marion Bienvenu, left, with Tim Sandifer in a scene from One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. 



Photo by News Bureau 



Tori Thompson wins LOB crown 





1 



In the 54th Annual Miss Northwestern-Lady of the Bracelet Pageant, Tori Thompson, a 
freshman seconday education major from Houston was crowned the winner. Thompson 
will compete in the Miss Louisiana Pageant this summer in Monroe. Thompson is a mem- 
ber of Phi Mu Fraternity, a Freshman Connector and a NSU Presidential Ambasador. For her 
victory, Thompson was rewarded more than $8,000 dollars in scholarships and prizes. For 
more information on Thompson's crowing, see Alexis Reliford's article on the Life page. 



NSU Health Services help students get well 



Natio 





1 



Mass dolphin deaths in Massachu- 
setts: Mysteriously, numerous dol- 
phins are beaching themselves along 
Cape Cod, MA. A total of 149 dol- 
phins have been found on the shore, 
and only 37 were found alive or well 
enough to be released back into the 



wild. 

California overturns ban on gay 
marriage: The 9th Circuit Court in 
California ruled the voter-passed ban 
on gay marriage as uncostitutional. 

U.S. born children denied food 
stamps in Alabama: An Alabama 
law prevents businesses from engag- 
ing in business transactions with il- 
legal immigrants. This law prevents 
the usage of food stamps to feed 
children who were born in the U.S. 



and also denies funds used for other 
necessities such as utility bills. 

Los Angeles school has entirely 
new faculty to avoid further 
abuse: After two teachers in a Los 
Angeles elementary school were ar- 
rested and charged with child abuse, 
the school board decided to hire 
an entirely new faculty in hopes of 
preventing any further abuse cases 
at the school. 



J.C. Bryant 

Sauce Reporter 

NSU Health Services is 
available to all students 
that experience any medial 
issues or discomfort. Far too many 
students go through college with 
little or no knowledge of the health 
serv ices available on campus. 

NSU Health Services, also known 
as the "infirmary," is equipped to 
deal w ith a w ide array of issues and 
is able to help about 80 percent of 
the students who visit. The other 20 
percent of students who are some- 
times unable to be helped directly 
can be referred to two different con- 
tracted physicians in Natchitoches. 

If you're feeling sick, stopping 
by the infirmary should be your first 
step in getting well. It is staffed with 
licensed professionals who can pro- 
vide medical advice and is equipped 



with a small pharmacy stocked with 
common over-the-counter drugs that 
can be given to students who need 
them. 

During the winter months. NSU 
Health Services experiences a heavi- 
er influx of students. 

"We saw about 75 students a week 
this past month", Stephanie Camp- 
bell, NSU Health Services director 
said. 

The staff at NSU Health Ser- 
vices typically deals with common 
colds, allergies and viruses as well 
as common gastrointestinal issues. 
They can provide students with the 
necessary medication and shots to 
help trump these illnesses and keep 
students in class. They are also 
equipped to administer all mandato- 
ry vaccines needed to attend college 
in Louisiana. 

According to Campbell, NSU 
Health Services now have the ability 



to help students with ADD/ADHD 
refill their prescriptions on campus. 
This service is a convenience for 
students who once had to endure the 
hassle of acquiring prescriptions via 
mail or external pharmacies. 

According to the Centers for Dis- 
ease Control and Prevention, 9.5 
percent of American teens (5.4 mil- 
lion) have at some time been diag- 
nosed with either ADD or ADHD. 
Applying this statistic to our own 
campus, we can assume that roughly 
850 students who attend NSU may 
have the opportunity to benefit from 
ADD or ADHD medication refills 
administered on campus . 

Now that this amenity is being 
offered, students can take full advan- 
tage of it. 

NSU Health Services is located in 
the Infirmary Building, next door to 
University Police. 



Dr. Julie Kane to sign books at Leesville Campus 




Sarah Hale 
Staff Reporter 

Dr. Julie Kane, professor of English, faculty advisor of Argus at Northwestern State University 
and Louisiana Poet Laureate will sign books and visit with students on Monday at 2:15 pm. at 
NSU's Leesville Campus Library. Kane will also be present at the Vernon Parish Library begin- 
ning at 3:15 p.m. NSU students are encouraged to attend the informal event. Kane will answer 
questions and refreshments will be served. 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

64738° 



Thursday 

63744° 



Friday 

65742° 



Saturday 

89762° 



Sunday 

63742° 



Monday 

61744° 



Tuesday 

71750° 




Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
February 8, 2012 



Thompson wins 2012 Lady of the Bracelet Pageant 



Alexis Reliford 

Staff Reporter 

Overwhelmed with 
emotion and smiling, 
the new Northwestern 
Lady of the Bracelet winner 
was crowed. Tori Thompson, a 
freshman secondary education 
major from Humble, TX became the 
new face of NSU. 

The 54" 1 annual LOB pageant 
was held last Saturday in A.A. 
Fredericks Auditorium. Thompson 
was awarded over S8,000 in 
scholarships and prizes. 

In addition to being crowned 
Lady of the Bracelet, Thompson 
also won first place for the talent, 
swimsuit and evening gown 
portions of the competition. 

She will compete in the Miss 
Louisiana Pageant this summer in 
Monroe. 

"When the bracelet was placed 
on my arm, I thought about all of 
the great w omen who came before 
me and was humbled by being 



given the opportunity to wear it and 
represent NSU," Thompson said. 

Her platform is "Volunteering: 
Everybody's doing it!" Thompson 
is encouraging teens to become 
volunteers and involved in their 
community instead of activities 
that could be harmful to them just 
because "every body's doing it." 

Thompson, a fourth-generation 
NSU student, raised over $1,800 
for the Children's Miracle Network 
through the Miss America 
Organization. 

To prepare for the pageant, 
Thompson w orked on her piano 
piece for the talent portion, 
practiced her interview skills, 
frequented the gym and avoided 
eating like a typical college student. 
Although this was her first time 
competing in the Miss America 
pageant system, LOB was not her 
first pageant. 

"I enjoyed the entire process 
from the first informational 
meetings, to raising money for 
Children's Miracle Network, to 



rehearsals," Thompson said. 

"I even enjoyed learning the 
great opening number that Ruth 
Fruge choreographed, even though 
it took me longer to learn because 
I'm not really a dancer." Fruge is 
the outgoing, 201 1 Lady of the 
Bracelet. 

The Student Activities Board 
sponsors the Lady of the Bracelet 
pageant and Hope Anderson, Miss 
Louisiana 201 1 , hosted the pageant. 

"I thought 1 might be nervous 
during the on-stage questionnaire, 
but Hope was so friendly that it was 
like having a conversation with a 
friend," Thompson said. "Waiting 
for crowning was extremely 
stressful and I really thought I might 
faint." 

Nineteen year-old Thompson 
is a member of Phi Mu Fraternity, 
a Freshman Connector and a NSU 
Presidential Ambassador. 

Her hobbies include playing the 
piano, volleyball, basketball, tennis 
and horseback riding. 




Submitted photo 



Tori Thompson is crowned Lady of the Bracelet. 



It's boot camp time: WRAC instructors offer ways to trim down 




Andrea Nedorostova 

Sauce Reporter 



Photo by Andrea Nedorostova 
Instructor Caroline Seago makes sure that participants of the Boot Camp perform every exercise right. 
From the left: Antonio Castro, Chris Sharplin, Chelsea Gibbs 

Valentine's Day 

What are you planning? 



Janitza Vasquez 

Sauce Reporter 

Valentine's Day is around 
the corner, and cupid is 
flying around NSU ready 
with his bow and arrow in hand. 
Students are running around trying 
to prepare special plans for their 
significant others for this upcoming 
holiday. 

NSU senior DeVry Smothers 
believes putting thought into his 
gifts will be the right way to go. His 
girlfriend is a part of Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Sorority, whose symbol is 
a frog, so he decided to give her a 
frog as one of his gifts to her. 

"Being that Natchitoches is 
so limited, I plan on taking her 
to Shreveport to her favorite 
restaurant, and while she's eating 
present her with a diamond heart 
necklace and the frog. The frog is 
meaningful to her," Smothers said. 

Brittany Grove, a senior account 
major, has been with her boyfriend 
since her freshman year, and she 
believes that getting her boyfriend 
something that he wants and also 
needs is the best way to celebrate 
this Valentine's Day. 

"This is going to be our fourth 
Valentines Day together, so we're 
over the trying to impress each 
other stage," Grove said. "He's into 



fashion, so I know clothes are not 
only the easy but are also best way 
to go on Valentines Day." 

While Valentine's Day is a fun 
holiday for most couples, it can also 
be a sad holiday if you're in a long 
distance relationship and you're 
reminded of the distance. 

NSU linebacker and criminal 
justice major, Jordan Sennett has 
been with his girlfriend for two 
years, and this is the first Valentine's 
Day they will be apart. 

"I can' physically be there with 
her, but I can do my best to make 
her feel special." Sennett said. "Her 
favorite flowers are yellow roses, so 
1 plan on getting some delivered to 
her dorm room before her first class 
on Valentine's Day." 

While some students at NSU are 
excited about the upcoming holiday, 
don't share the same enthusiasm. 

Ashley William, a freshman 
nursing major, explains that she 
doesn't see the huge commotion 
that circulates around this 
"senseless" holiday. 

"I never understood the big 
deal about Valentine's Day," 
William said. "People pick a day 
out of the year to show their love 
for one another. Shouldn't this be 
an everyday thing? Honestly, it's 
another pointless holiday made by 
the marketing businesses to make 



money. 

Williams added that she could 
possibly feel that w ay because she 
is normally single around this of the 
year, and she has never experienced 
Valentine's Day with a significant 
other. 

For most people, being single on 
Valentine's Day can be a downer. 
But being single and dateless on 
Valentine's Day can be pleasant and 
even relaxing. 

Amanda Cunningham, a senior, 
said that being single on Valentine's 
Day is more fun with a group of 
your close girlfriends than with 
a date or boyfriend. She believes 
if you're in a relationship, you're 
stressing over this holiday, and if 
you're single you don't have that 
problem. 

"Girls act like being single on 
Valentine's Day is the worst thing 
in the world. On Valentine's Day, 
all my single girlfriends and me get 
together, exchange gifts w ith each 
other and we tell each other how 
amazing we all are," Cunningham 
said. "So there's no stressing, but 
just a good time." 

Whether it's planning a special 
evening with your boyfriend or 
girlfriend, or an evening out with 
the girls, plans for Valentine's Day 
are in full effect. So what are you 
doing for this Valentine's Day? 



I 



t happens to all of us — lack of 
free time, loss of motivation, 
no determination, nobody to 
workout with, and plenty of other 
reasons. But how can you get back 
a desire to workout? 

Boot Camp is a perfect starting 
point. The Boot Camp instructors 
are ready to cheer for you every 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 
5:30 a.m. in the WRAC. The Boot 
Camp started Jan. 18 and continues 
until Feb. 17. 

Boot Camp is open to everyone 
who wants to start the day right. 
The price for current students and 
members of the WRAC is S50 and 
$95 for non-members. Participants, 
who will complete all 14 sessions, 
will get a free 30-minute massage. 

The instructors try to be 
inventive with exercises. They want 
to challenge participants and keep 
them excited. 

"If they can't do it, we 



modify the exercise for them," 
Bianca Schulz, instructor said 

"Their effort this early in the 
morning is super-good. However, 
sometimes they o . rdo it to keep up 
with the best," ^ hulz said. 

WRAC Boo; ' imp's 14 
morning session^ mean waking 
up at 5 a.m. to workout — not 
everyone's cup of tea. But 
according to participants, the 
advantage of a group workout is 
unbeatable. 

"It is not one of those miserable 
workouts," Shundrika Scott, an 
NSU alumna said. 

"We have done so many different 
things. It is never the same routine. 
The instructors are excellent," 
Scott, a participant in NSU WRAC 
Boot Camps since 2010, said. 

To participate in the Boot Camp, 
visit the WRAC. Registration forms 
are located at the front desk. 

For more information, call 
the WRAC wellness coordinator 
Carmel Bourg at 3 1 8-357-533 1 . 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"The Grey" 

Rated R 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"One for the Money" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 7:00 9:30pm 

"Red Tails" 

Rated PG-13 
4:00 p.m. 6:40 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Chronicle" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

^"Joyful Noise" 

Rated PG-13 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 






Jacob 
Labutka 

Fashion 
Columnist 



Highlights of the Lady of 
the Bracelet Pageant 

Last Saturday's pageant was 
an event marked by the 
presence of 10 beautiful 
women all vying for the chance 
to be nc-^.ed the w inner of the 54* 
Annual Miss Northwestern-Lady of 
the Bracelet. 

While the awards given at the 
end of the night were well decided, 
I felt it necessary to provide my 
own discourse on the highlights of 
the evening. 

After the opening parade of 
contestants, Ruth Fruge, the 2011 
Lady of the Bracelet winner fiercely 
walked the stage showcasing a 
beautiful short blue dress lined at 
the top and across her waist with 
streaks of silver shine. Over her 
dress was a long shawl to match 
which, along with her fierce stage 
presence, aided in gaining the 
audience's undivided attention. 

The Mistress of Ceremonies for 
the evening was the well-spoken 
Hope Anderson, the 201 1 Miss 
Louisiana winner. She immediately 
pulled at my fashionable 
heartstrings as she related how one 
of the judges had taken her for the 
shopping spree of her life before 
competing in the Miss America 
Pageant. 

Her fabulous wardrobe for 
the national pageant included 
a Valentino dress and a pair of 
incredible shoes by Christian 
Louboutin. Anderson noted that 
purchasing these designers' labels 
made her feel as bedazzled as Julia 
Roberts in/^/fv Woman. 

In the swimsuit competition, I 
felt that Harlie Dominique had the 
best selection and exhibited the 
most confidence. Her turquoise 
bikini was the best color, fit well 
on her and its line of silver sparkles 
accentuated the appeal to this 
swimsuit. 

One of the best evening gowns 
worn that night was Rikia Ancar's 
one-shoulder sparkling dress that 
was embellished with a silver 
flower brooch. 

The cream colored full-length 
gown perfectly complemented her 
skin tone and elegantly fitted her 
contours. 

One of my favorite dresses was 
the Tori Thompson's-the 20 1 2 
LOB winner-purple gown she wore 
during the talent portion of the 
competition. This dress' immediate 
appeal was its purple color (my 
favorite color actually) which is 
a beautiful and bold color for any 
dress. When she sat, the audience 
was immediately taken by surprise 
upon noticing the very unique 
interior lining of her dress: large, 
multi-colored polka dots. 

My readers may notice that I 
have an affinity for sparkles given 
that many of the outfits I have 
highlighted include them. However, 
sparkles were certainly not the only 
reason behind my choosing (there 
is such a thing as one too many 
sparkles). 

At the end of the night, I could 
honestly say that the stage held a 
diverse group of contestants whose 
beauty was accentuated not only by 
their fashionable gowns but also by 
their radiant personalities. 



Be sure to 

visit our website 

nsucurrentsauce. 
com 

fcr exclusive 

content 




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Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
February 8, 2012 



Rants: The 'Big Game' holiday 




Tom H. Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



A 



nd so it 
came to 
pass that 
in the year 2012 another Super 
Bowl successfully inspired and 
thrilled a nation. Abnormally, I 
watched the game by myself this 
year with homework all around me. 
There was no chips-n-dip, burgers 
or jerseys. However, such a viewing 
position gave me a different view of 
the Super Bowl. 

It occurred to me all the work 
that goes into such an event. Never 
mind the players down on the field, 
but think of all the performers, 
coordinators, security and personnel 
needed to ensure a happy Super 



Bowl for all of us spectating. 

The Super Bow l is really just 
one big holiday. 

Normally, it is the case that I 
do not care for holidays of any 
kind, but with the Super Bow 1, 1 
recognize the big deal. In one event 
is the epitome of American brutish, 
gawdy and materialistic pageantry 
(as quintessentially evident w ith 
Madonna being pulled out to the 
50-yard line by Greek soldiers). 
I whole-heartedly go overboard 
except for this year, unfortunately. 

The Super Bowl has everything 
that a holiday requires. 

It has advertisements and 
reminders for weeks and months 
prior to the actual game. Readily 
available on the Internet are 
commercials for sweepstakes and 
contests to win tickets. Sometimes, 



they depict the fair and radiant city 
(Indianapolis, seriously?) with the 
privilege of hosting the Super Bowl. 

Of course, there are the 
advertisements during the game as 
well. You, dear reader, especially 
anticipate these advertisements. 

The Super Bowl has one of 
the oldest and noblest American 
traditions of family. Family and 
friends flock to parties in each 
other's homes. At these parties, 
we gather with anticipation and 
beer, reminiscing on the previous 
season and predicting the upcoming 
game. Such scenes are similar 
to Thanksgiving and Christmas 
celebrations. 

So with the parties and 
excitement, I think it follows quite 
naturally that it ought to require 
time off from obligations like 



school and work. This idea is even 
more stressed w hen you consider 
the people that travel to watch the 
game or to a relative's party. I am 
thinking time off should be given 
for either the Monday after or 
Friday before the game. 

Many boring holidays exist such 
as Columbus Day or President's 
Day. We also have entire months 
devoted to solemn certain causes: 
Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 
Black History Month (happy BHM 
by the way) and even Toyota Tuck- 
a-thon Month. 

So why not make the Super 
Bowl a holiday? We could get rid 
of one holiday to make room if we 
had to. 

No matter its condition, Super 
Bowl Sunday remains as perhaps 
the most celebrated weekend in 
American culture. 



We need writers! 



Our newspaper 
needs stories writ- 
ten by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every 
Monday at 6 p.m. 

We hope to hear 
from you! 

- Current Sauce 
staff 



L 



Discovering courage with student media 




Taesha 
Johnson 

Practicuum 
Student 



I 



n grade 
school, I was 
"painfully shy 
and anxious 
about everything. The mere thought 
of speaking in front of people or 
doing something I had never done 
before made me nauseous. 

The summer before college I 
realized I would not get where I 



wanted to be if I didn't try to break 
out of my shyness and anxiety. I 
decided to do things that I wouldn't 
normally do and push myself to the 
forefront. 

In my freshman year of college, 
I was a freshman scholar for our 
yearbook. The Potpourri. When 
you're working in a group, you 
have to be able to voice your 
opinion or communicate in order 
for the group to be cohesive. 

While on the yearbook staff, 
I had to move past my fear of 
interviews, asking questions for 



interviews and also asking for 
pictures and quotes. I also joined 
the news team and worked as 
producer and an anchor that year. 

Many times I had to really 
work through feeling nauseous 
and visualize myself not being 
so fearful. 1 had to consistently 
put myself in situations that were 
uncomfortable to me so that I would 
become more confident. Fighting 
through my shyness and nausea 
eventually paid off. 

I have been working for student 
media for three years now, and 1 am 



far more comfortable with public 
speaking or speaking with people in 
general than I ever was. 

Working for student media is 
gradually assisting me in breaking 
out of my timid shell, and I am 
forever grateful for that. I am 
now preparing to write speeches 
for a communications class. 
Whereas, three years ago, I would 
have probably pleaded with the 
department head to sign me up 
for something else, today I can 
visualize myself getting through the 



speech with minimal indicators of 
nervousness. 

I've learned an important life 
skill that I'll need in the future. The 
best w ay to get rid of your fear is to 
face it head on. Although it won't 
give you a warm, cozy feeling for 
maybe for the first few times, it will 
get better after you keep putting 
yourself up against your fear. The 
fear will subside. 

Thanks to student media, I am 
one step closer to being the person I 
want to be. 



King Crossword 



ACROSS 

1 Gorilla 
4 Year-end 

visitor 
9 Col. 

Sanders' 

chain 

12 Droop 

13 Up to the 
point that 

14 Uftra- 
mociemts? 

15 Tennessee 
city 

17 Cheerios 
ingredient 

18 Moving 
truck 

19 Makes into 
law 

21 Revealing 
swwnsuit 

24 Pofto 
vaccine 
pioneer 

25 Director 
Howard 

26 Exploswe 
letters 

28 Leaf pom 
31 Teensytwt 
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sister 
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lully 
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end CAbbr> 

41 Weeded. In i 
way 

43 Ren ted 





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CJurrentSauce 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



45 


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54 






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53 


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SB 







45 


WW horse 




Org. 




particle 


47 


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34 


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48 


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8 


Sports 




that for 


49 


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venues 




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Cheaper 


37 


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Barracks 




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56 


Rowing need 




beds 


42 


Karan ©4 


57 


- Angeles 


16 


LOuiS — 




fashion 


58 


Acquires 


20 


Can. prov. 


44 


Citrus 


59 


Resort 


21 


Scottish 




beverage 








hillside 


45 


Jump (out;) 


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22 


Greek vowel 


46 


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Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 




Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



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Imploring the 
populace: put 
a lid on it 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
Editor 



This article is nothing more 
than a rant. Please try to 
forgive me if I insult you, 
but this rant has been a long time in 
coming. 

Something that has occurred to 
me over this last weekend is how 
inconsiderate people are to others. 
This should have been obvious to 
me since I live in UPII. 

From dinnertime to midnight, it 
seems as though people are having 
fits on the sidewalk near my room. 
If they aren't screaming (literally— 
not in the sense that they are talking 
loudly) then someone is getting into 
a fight with his or her significant 
other. 

After I drown out that nonsense, 
I get to hear what seems to be 
a stampede of cattle outside of 
my door. It is always nice to be 
reminded that college is sometimes 
ju~ .1 da* *ple whc 

pose 

Now it may seem Uku .... guiag 
overboard in my defamation of 
some of my fellow students, but 
I've had one too many sleepless 
nights because of silly people. 

Last Thursday, as some of you 
know, Natchitoches finally got a 
good dose of rain. Although it was 
wonderful for the water level of 
Cane River Lake, it did horrors to 
my sleeping schedule. 

Normally, falling asleep to the 
sound of rain is the easiest thing to 
do. It becomes a more difficult task 
when you are listening to the echoes 
of girls shrieking like banshees 
because they got a little wet. 

This isn't to say that 
Northwestern students are the 
only inconsiderate people in the 
world-of course not. The offense 
was repeated when I went to see 
The Grey at the movie theater this 
weekend. 

I'm not against a little 
whispering during a movie. It is 
completely natural to want to speak 
to a friend about the plot of a movie 
as suspenseful as The Grey, but I 
don't recommend whipping out 
your cell phone and carrying on 
a minute-long conversation with 
someone. 

Also, I don't think many people 
appreciate those people that sit in 
the back and cackle at the most 
inopportune times. 

It may seem like I'm being a 
little grouchy, and that's definitely 
a reasonable observation, but I'm 
fed up with people who don't seem 
to respect my rights to a little quiet 
once in a while. 

Yes, those people outside of 
UPII pay money to live there, and 
people pay to watch movies, but 
so do I. There are basic guidelines 
of behavior in public settings, and 
it seems as if they go unnoticed to 
many. 

So next time you are out on the 
town, or even if you're just standing 
outside of a dormitory, remember to 
lower your voice, and maybe others 
will decide to respect you in the 
same way. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@studcnt.nsula.edu 
February 8, 2012 



Demons improve to five consecutive wins 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Contributions throughout the 
roster were apparent Satur- 
day as Northwestern State got 
35 points off the bench, with James 
Hulbin breaking out of a slump 
as he scored 14 points helping the 
Demons cruise past Texas A&M- 
Corpus Christi 82-68 for their fifth 
straight Southland Conference bas- 
ketball victory. 

It's the best conference win streak 
in six seasons for the Demons, 14-9 
overall and tied for second in the 1 2- 
team conference with a 7-2 league 
record. NSU got 17 points and four 
assists from Louis Ellis, who hit 
4-of-5 on 3-pointers, while Shamir 
Davis added 15 points with four as- 
sists, sinking 7 of 8 free throws. 
Demons senior center William Mos- 
ley joined the Southland Confer- 
ence career rebounding top 10 with 
his fourth of nine rebounds. Mosley 
has 1,036 boards for 10th in league 
history and is 12 away from passing 
Randy White of Louisiana Tech for 
ninth place. 

While rejecting four shots, the 6-7 
Mosley moved up one spot to 12th 
on the NCAA career blocked shots 
list with 430, passing 6-11 Calvin 
Booth of Penn State, who had 428 
from 1994-99. Mosley needs seven 
to tie for 1 1 th and 1 1 to break into 
the top 10. 

Hulbin, who had scored only 24 
points combined in the last five 
games, had half that many as NSU 
ran to a 46-35 halftime advantage. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Shamir Davis and James Hulbin trap the Corpus Christi dribbler. Demons won 82-68. 



closing the half on an 8-1 burst in 
the final 2:07. 

Gary Roberson hit a 3-pointer and 
a jump shot as the Demons scored 
the first seven points after halftime 



to go ahead 53-35. The Islanders (4- 
18, 3-7), despite 21 points apiece by 
Terence Jones and Chris Hawkins- 
Mast, never got closer than 1 1 after- 
ward and lost their third in a row. 



"We were the aggressor during 
that point of the game," said 13th- 
year Demons' coach Mike McCo- 
nathy, whose team moved to 22-4 
at home in the past two years as 



1,523 watched at Prather Coliseum. 
"That's the key to our team. When 
we come out and create tempo de- 
fensively, good things happen to us." 
Up by 19 with 4:19 to go. North- 
western ran the shot clock under 1 
seconds on its remaining posses- 
sions before looking for the basket. 
"Louis Ellis had a nice game and 
James Hulbin stepped up and 
drained some shots for us," McCo- 
nathy said. "O.J. Evans gave us a 
good matchup on Jones after half- 
time, and held him to six second-half 
points, which was a key contribution 
for us. Tyler Washington, Marvin 
Frazier and Gary Roberson went 
on their own personal mini-runs to 
spark us. We're getting good contri- 
butions throughout our roster." 
Mosley 's latest milestones were typ- 
ically understated, said McConathy. 
"William made some great rebounds 
and outlets to get us running in the 
second half, and we got some good 
transition points. The beauty is that 
Will's only interested in winning 
games and playing as hard as he can, 
not in all of these landmarks." 
The Demons outshot the Islanders 
49-40 percent, raising NSU's record 
to 1 2-0 when it outshoots the opposi- 
tion and also when opponents score 
under 70. 

Northwestern will be on the road 
twice next week, at Lamar on 
Wednesday night and visiting South- 
eastern Louisiana next Saturday 
night. The next home game for the 
Demons is Monday night, Feb. 13 
against East Division co-leader Mc- 
Neese State. 



Upcoming Games 




at Lamar Feb. 8 

at Southeastern Feb. 1 1 
McNeese Feb. 13 
Campbell State Feb. 18 
Sam Houston Feb. 22 
at UTA Feb. 25 

Nicholls Feb. 29 

at SFA Mar. 3 

Southland 
Conference Tourna- 
ment begins Mar. 7 
and ends Mar 10. 




Mosley blocks his way into history 



Malcolm Kirkendoll 

Sauce Reporter 

orth western State 
IV I University's all-time shot 
L ^ blocker passed Shaquille 

O'Neal for 19 th on the NCAA 
All-Time Block list on Jan. 25 in 
the game versus Lamar University 
and is continuing to climb up the 
ranks. 

Mosley was three blocks behind 
Shaquille O'Neal going into the Jan. 
25 game against Lamar University. 
'"I was more focused on getting the 
"W" more than anything," Mosley 
said. Mosley said he didn't know 
he was about to pass Shaq's record 
until people told him and he read it 
on Twitter. 

Mosley's ascension continued 
the following games. 

He jumped two spots to IT* 1 
after a dominating defensive 
performance of six blocks against 
Southeastern. 

In the UCA game. Mosley 
was limited due to foul trouble 
but notched five blocks that 
bumped him to 1 3 th on the list. 
He is currently ranked 1 2 lb after 
Saturday's game against Corpus 
Christi. 

William Mosleym a senior from 
Shreveport, was the NCAA Block 
champion last season and is in 
second place, averaging 4.3 blocks 
a game according to ncaa.com. 
NCAA also rated him in the top 25 
in rebounds, averaging 9.9 rebounds 
a game. 

Standing at only 6 '7," Mosley, 
undersized for the center position, 
makes up his size with tremendous 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
William Mosely notches one of his many blocks. 



leaping ability. 

"Being undersized does give me 
that extra drive because I'm not as 
tall as other centers in the nation," 
Mosley said. "I can say that gives 
me that driv e to put in nothing less 
than 1 1 percent on the defensive 
end of the court." 

Leading the team in blocks and 
rebounds, Mosley is also the team's 
second leading scorer. Mosley said 
he feels no pressure being one of 
the leaders on the team. 
Demon basketball head coach 
Michael McConathy explained that 



Mosley's most impressive feature is 
his ability to be a leader. 

"The beauty is that Will's only 
interested in winning games and 
playing as hard as he can, not in all 
of these landmarks," McConathy 
said. 

Mosley graduated last December 
with a degree in general studies 
and is eager to win the Southland 
Conference Championship in March 
in Katy, Texas. 

Mosley wants to declare himself 
eligible for the NBA draft at the end 
of the season. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Tiandra Williams guards an opponent. She scored 20 points in the game against the Lady Islanders. 

Lady Demons drop a nailbiter at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 



Matthew Fowler 

Sauce Reporter 

Myeisha Myles' put back 
basket with 2.1 seconds re- 
maining was the game-win- 
ner for Texas A&M-Corpus 
Christi Saturday night in an 88-86 
Southland Conference women's 
basketball nailbiter over visiting 
Northwestern State, which suffered 
its second straight heart-breaking 
defeat despite Trudy Armstead and 
Tiandra Williams each scoring 20- 
plus points. 

NSU (5-17 overall, 1-8 in the 
Southland) tied the game with 16.7 
seconds to play when 1 2-point scor- 
er Jordi James sank the first of two 
free throws. 

She missed the second and the 
Islanders got possession when the 
rebound was knocked out of bounds. 
A&M-CC (8-14, 4-5) moved the 



ball upcourt and Armstead blocked 
the bid for the go-ahead basket, 
but Myles lassoed the rebound and 
scored underneath to break the tie. 
She finished with a game-high 27 
points. 

The Lady Demons inbounded be- 
fore coach Jennifer Graf could call 
timeout and rushed upcourt. Arm- 
stead's 15-footer to tie went in, but 
officials reviewed the game tape and 
ruled it did not leav e her hand before 
the final buzzer. 

"We entered it so quick, but we 
got it in a great spot so there was no 
reason to keep yelling for a time- 
out because Corpus (Christi) hadn't 
caught up," said Graf. 

NSU was in front of league-lead- 
ing Central Arkansas until the final 
minutes Wednesday night in a 67-61 
defeat. 

The game-winning basket typified 
the Isles' offensive success. 

"That was kind of the story of 



the game having Miles getting inside 
and getting the put back or forcing 
our post players too far underneath 
the basket to get the easy stops," said 
Graf. 

Armstead finished with 22 points, 
while Williams, a sophomore guard, 
recorded her first double-double on 
career bests of 20 points and 10 re- 
bounds in 25 minutes played. 
"Everybody has said that she is the 
most athletic player we have, and 
we've just needed to hone those 
skills and get them under control," 
said Graf. "We knew Tiandra had it 
in her for sure." 

Three other Lady Demons posted 
double-digit scoring efforts includ- 
ing the fourth double-double of the 
season from Jasmine Upchurch, who 



For rest of story: 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Amber Waves 



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THE FACT THAT MY MIDDLE 
NAME IS AFTER YOU AND ALL. 



TO SAY THE LEAST WHEN 
PEOPLE SAY YOUR NAME IT GIVES 
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by Dave T. Phipps 



V0U MIGHT BE PROUD, BUT 
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Wednesday, February 15, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 97: Issue 17 



NSU 'Oscars' honors Black History Month 



Ty Johnson 

Practician Student 

Helping Hands' annual Black 
History program opens 
Feb. 29 in the Magale Re- 
cital Hall at 6 p.m. 

Helping Hands has its own 
history of presenting their Black 
History program through an array of 
creative outlets in an effort to enter- 
tain and educate at the same time. 

Junior criminal justice major 
and Helping Hands public relations 
chairman, Kenneth Brown, said the 
program will feature dance tributes, 
poetry, selections by the NSU Lifted 
Voices Choir, skits and more. 

"We're going to highlight 
African American achievements 
and honor important people others 
might not know about," Brown said. 

Helping Hands will present the 
Black History program in a way 
they never have before. The theme 
and setup for the event will be 
modeled after the Oscar Academy 
Awards. 

The Oscars theme will offer 
a red carpet for special guests, a 
grand opening and tributes for 
important leaders in Black History. 
Among those who will be honored 
are Malcolm X and the Tuskegee 
Airmen. 

"I thought of the design when I 
was a freshman in Helping Hands 
three years ago," Brown said. "I've 
added to it since then. I had the 
opportunity to make it happen this 
year." 

Brown is responsible for the ins 



and outs of the Black History pro- 
gram. His responsibilities include 
everything from lighting and audio, 
to producing scripts and being an 
acting coach. 

"It's been challenging," Brown 
said. "It's a tough task because there 
are so many tasks in different de- 
partments, but the group of people 
I work with are very receptive, and 
they're just as motivated as I am." 

Brown said his responsibility 
to the event is important to him 
because Helping Hands is the first 
organization he joined on campus. 

Brown is assured the program 
will have a good turnout. 
"We have a campus that is very 
supportive of RSOs," Brown said. 
"NSU always supports Helping 
Hands." 

Senior computer information 
systems major and Helping Hands 
President, Kevin Blake, said he 
intends for everyone to take some- 
thing home with them that they 
didn't know before about Black 
History. 

He feels it's important to know 
how much America has progressed. 
The program will serve as a re- 
minder and a teaching tool. 

"It's good to remember the 
people that paved the way," Blake 
said. "I don't know how it feels to 
have gone through what they did, 
but I know of it. You should want to 
know about the people that helped 
you get to where you are now. 
That's why we will -target the people 
others may not know about but were 
still a big factor in Black history. I 




Photo submitted by Kevin Blake 
Helping Hands members prepare for their Oscars-themed Black History Program. 



think it will be educational." 

Junior psychology major and 
Helping Hands member, Angel 
Johnson, has participated in the an- 
nual program for three years. 

"I feel honored every year that 
I am a part of it," Johnson said. 
"Sometimes I learn something I 
didn't know, and other times J am 
reminded of something I hadn't 
thought about lately. It's a great 



experience. 

Kevin Blake is confident the 
event will be a success. 
"I think Kenneth is doing a good 
job in making sure we represent our 
history. Helping Hands and NSU in 
a positive light," 

"In the past, we've always done 
an excellent job with the program, 
and I want to build from that and 
keep it going," Blake added. 



The Black History program is 
open for all RSOs to lend a hand 
and participate. 

Blake encourages people from 
all walks of life to attend and 
celebrate humanity overcoming 
adversity. 

"It's not just about color," Blake 
said. "It's about the message of our 
history. It's about unity and being 
unified as a nation." 



Students tougher than economic 
times, jugg ling jobs a nd school 

Aaron Dean 

Sauce Reporter 

Costs of food, board and 
tuition have risen by a cu- 
mulative 9.99 percent since 
fall 2010 according to NSU's ar- 
chived tuitions and fees. For many 
students, it has become a necessity 
to find a job. 

"Approximately 600 students 
are employed on campus, but the 
number fluctuates by about 50 
every month," Dawn Bauman, head 
of Student Employment said. 

The money does not come 
easily. Students have to stack time 
spent working with studying, leav- 
ing them less time for themselves. 

"Brookshire's is pretty good 
about not scheduling you during 
your classes," Austin Burns said. 

"But they'll usually have you 
working within the hour you get 
out of school. You have to set 
aside hours for studying. That way, 
when they ask which hours you're 
available to work, you won't give 
them hours that leave you no time 
to study." 

Burns, like many student work- 
ers, sought ajob to help him pay 
for college expenses. He admits he 
does not have as much time for his 
RSOs, but he still manages to be 
apart of their planned ev ents. 

"If you ask for a day off at 
least a week ahead, they'll usually 
give it to you," Burns said. "You 
really have to manage your time, 
otherwise vou won't have any." 




tational 
News 



Washington and New Jersey prog- 
ress sames-sex marriage: Wash- 
ington governer signed a bill Mon- 
day legalizing gay marriage in the 
respective state. New Jersey Senate 
passed a vote in favor of a similar 
bill. 



Florida college student killed by 
hazing: Robert Champion Jr. was 
allegedly beaten to death in a haz- 
ing event at Florida A&M. No one 
has been charged for the death yet. 

Midwest militia prepared to 
attack America: Seven members 
of a militia group in the midwest 
were plotting against police mem- 
bers and were preparing for war. 
David Stone, the leader, is on trial 
as are three of his family members 
and three other militia members. A 
federal trial has started in Detroit. 




Leesville Interim 
Director named 

Sarah Hale 

Staff Reporter 

Dr. Randy Haley is the 
new Interim Execu- 
tive Director at NSU's 
Leesville Campus. He received 
undergraduate and graduate 
degrees in social work and 
history from Louisiana State 
University. He is editing a book 
about his father's experiences as 
a prisoner during World War II. 

60 attend 
Scholars' Day 

Jessica Viator 

Sauce Reporter 

Scholars' Day last Saturday had 
the largest amount of visiting 
prospective students since the 
college was founded in 1987. 

Over 60 students came in 
from La, Ak and Texas to visit 
the campus. Besides touring the 
campus, the prospective students 
also observed classes ranging from 
biology to World War II. 

The students were then brought 
to the Student Union and intro- 
duced to many on-campus organiz- 
tions and services. 

Finally, the potential newcom- 
ers toured the University Place II 
dorms and had a Q&A session with 
current students. 

Parents also had their own ques- 
tions answered at a separate panel 
with the Scholars' facutly. 

Scholars' recruiter Whintey Co- 
china commented, "Scholars' Day 
is really integrated look at Louisana 
Scholars' College and caters to both 
the students and the parents." 



Submitted Photo 

Nancy Yerby, a sophomore family and consumer science major, helps 
Meshelle Mangum, a junior social work major, in Kyser computer lab. 



Not every job competes with study 
time though. Some campus jobs 
such as working in the library allow 
students to study while working. 

Students such as Johnathan Jack- 
son and Trayvin Cooper work at the 
library. 

"As long as the work gets done, 
they don't mind if you study," Jack- 
son said. "On campus jobs work 
with your schedule. The library 
is easier to work at because they 
schedule around my classes." 

Jackson had issues with his 
former job because his work hours 
clashed with his school hours. He 
warns students to find a job they 
like because they'll have that job all 
semester. 



Cooper said he did much of his 
work in the library. He warns stu- 
dents who are searching for ajob to 
watch whom they associate with. 

"If your employer sees you 
hanging around with people they 
don't think are good people, they 
might start to think you're like 
them. They'll find somebody else 
to work if they don't think you take 
your job seriously," Cooper said. 

NSU offers services to those 
students who are looking for jobs. 
The Counseling and Career Services 
located in room 305 of the Student 
Union helps students prepare re- 
sumes, and they also conduct mock 
interviews. 



Scholars' seniors donate to shelter 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

The Scholars' College Senior 
Colloquium class presented 
D.O.V.E.S (Domestic 
Violence Education and Support) 
Inc., a non-profit domestic violence 
shelter serving Natchitoches Parish, 
with $245. 

The money came from an event 
from last semester. The class hosted 
a dinner and movie night featuring 
the screening of "We're All Angels" 
to raise gender awareness. 

Their intention was to help 
students gain "a better understand- 
ing of different lifestyles" said Kyle 
May, the student who spearheaded 
the fundraising event. 

The documentary focuses on 
Jason and DeMarco, who are homo- 
sexual Christian musicians. They 
are having a hard time finding ac- 
ceptance within the Christian music 
community. 

May says that there was a bit of 
drama involving students who did 



not want the documentary shown. 

"We wanted to have an open 
discussion on an issue not usually 
brought up," 

Tara Luck, another student of 
the colloquium class said, "these are 
hard topics to tackle. I am Southern 
Baptist and this isn't something that 
is usually discussed." 

Dr. Holly Stave, the course in- 
structor would like for her students 
and others to get rid of the notion 
that there are two genders. There is 
a difference between biological sex, 
gender and gender identity. 

According to PlannedParent- 
hood.org, biological sex is how 
we are defined as female, male or 
intersex. It describes our sexual 
and reproductive anatomy, genetic 
makeup and hormones. Gender is 
a mixture of our behaviors, beliefs 
and characteristics while gender 
identity refers to how we feel about 
ourselves and how we express our- 
selves in our gender roles. 

Stave said: "There are many 
genders. For example, biologically- 
sexed women who are very mas- 



culine but who are heterosexual. 
There biologically-sexed men who 
are very masculine but who are 
homosexual and the list goes on and 
on and on. These days, more and 
more people are deciding they are 
'gender-queer,' which means they 
refuse the binary altogether and will 
not be one or the other, but both 
at the same time. And there is no 
problem with that." 

Luck feels that she has learned 
much in this course about gender 
identification. She asserts that 
despite the fact that we will always 
identify people, in part, by their 
gender, it is important to be open to 
letting people be who they are and 
not force them to conform to our 
strict gender stereotypes. 

Senior Colloquium is a manda- 
tory course for graduating seniors 
of Louisiana Scholars' College, one 
of seven undergraduate colleges at 
Northwestern State University. The 
purpose of the class is to address 
issues in society. 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

59741° 



Thursday 

64741° 



Friday 

64745° 



Saturday 

65747° 




Sunday 

59743° 



Monday 

57744° 



Tuesday 

64743° 






Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
February 15, 2012 




Submitted photo 

Pictured above: members of the African American Caucus. The organization aims to represent the interest of African-American college students. 

AAC encourages involvement on campus 



Jo - clan White 

Sauce Reporter 

Have you been wondering 
how you could get more 
involved on campus or even 
which RSO to join? 

Well, the African American 
Caucus may be for you. The 
African American Caucus, better 
known as AAC, is here to serve 
the community and the students of 
Northwestern State University. It 
was previously known as the Black 
Student Organization. 

"We were founded on April 4, 
1991, and later in 2008 our name 
was changed to African American 
Caucus," Kenneth Brown, AAC 



President, said. 

The African American Caucus 
was restored oy the efforts of 
Marcus Sanders, a NSU alumnus, in 
fall 2009. 

AAC's mission is "to represent 
the interest of African American 
college students and the greater 
African American community by 
providing awareness of societal 
issues, service to our community 
and organizing informal and social 
events on campus." 

Events such as the Voter 
Registration Drive and AAC Movie 
Night reflect their mission. 

You may be thinking, why- 
should 1 join AAC? 

"AlAC is an organization where 



you directly affect your peers and 
your community," Brown said, 
it's a chance to into' act with not 
only fellov. .tudents, but also 
commur.. * leaders. We allow 
you to be proactive as a citizen in 
Natchitoches, La." 

If community service and 
being a leader on campus interest 
you, then AAC just might be the 
organization you have been looking 
for. 

AAC meetings are held every 
Wednesday at 5:15 p.m. following 
the Helping Hands meeting in 
the Cane River Room of the 
Student Union. To join, come to 
the meetings and participate in the 



events and services provided. Also, 
you can join the Orgsync network 
at NSU, which is a Web site for 
recognized student organizations, 
and request to join the organization. 

AAC will host a Black History 
Program on Feb. 29. There will 
be music, poetry performances, 
presentations on influential people 
in Black history and many other 
things. AAC can also be found on 
Facebook and Twitter. Look out 
for upcoming events later on in the 
semester including fonims and a 
fashion show. 

There is no time like the present 
so scour the campus to find out 
ways that you can be of service! 



Smell Goods: The Unknown Accessory 



NSU poetry organization prepares for next slam 



Angela Owusu-Duku 

Sauce Reporter 

Natchitoches, LA — Poetry 
in the form of spoken w ord 
will fill the air at the Brainy 
Acts Poetry Society's first outdoor 
slam Feb. 28. 

BAPS is hosting the free event 
in the Sabine Hall parking lot at 7 
p.m. Comprised of NSU students, 
the team of poets prepare for the 
upcoming slam entitled, War. 

Clemonce Heard, the 
organization's founder, said he 
anticipates a record student turnout 
for the group's sixth slam. The 
senior graphic arts major is the 
"brains" behind spoken word poetry 
resurfacing Northwestern's campus. 
He prides himself on teaching and 
encouraging writers to write w ith 



feeling and recite it w ith a theatrical 
touch. 

"Poetry is God. God is 
everything to me, so is poetry," 
Heard said. 

Currently, a majority of the 24 
members will participate in the 
upcoming event. Janasia Smith, a 
junior social work major, is one of 
the featured poets in the War slam. 

"Poetry is the art of expression," 
Smith said. "I anticipate people 
being touched by the words 
spoken." 

BAPS was founded April 2010. 
Northwestern has rewarded the 
organization with the Educational 
Commitment to Excellence Award 
for their leadership role in educating 
students through poetry. The 
organization is open to all NSU 
students. 




Photo by Angela Owusu-Duku 
BAPS poses after the Controversy slam. 




WRAC offers fun, new way to shape up 



Submitted photo 



Membrie Gibbons 

Staff reporter 

Zumba, a new group 
exercise class is now offered 
at the NSU WRAC. Students 
are welcome to attend the class to 
have fun and get their heart rates up. 

Zumba is a Latin dance-inspired 
fitness program that mixes dance 
elements with aerobics. The class 
offers students the opportunity 
to have a unique and fun way of 
working out. 

The class offers a little 
something for every one. The dance 
moves come from a variety of 
different styles including hip-hop. 
soca, samba, salsa, merengue, 
mambo, martial arts and some 
Bollywood and belly dance moves. 

Due to the increasing popularity 
of the class, it is now held in the 
gym at the WRAC instead of da^ce 
studio on the free-weights floor. Hie 
WRAC wanted to allow everyone 
who had an interest in Zumba to 
be able to participate, and since 
the class is held in the gym, more 
people can participate. 



Deanna Bourgeois, a freshman 
nursing major in the Louisiana 
Scholars' College, liked the energy 
the Zumba class and instructor 
brought. 

"The class is so energetic 
and fun," Bourgeois said. "The 
instructor is always getting the 
group pumped up. You can feel the 
energy as soon as the class starts. I 
love it!" 

It's not only the girls that enjoy 
Zumba, but guys are participating in 
the class as well. 
Marquez Wilson, a sophomore 
psychology major thoroughly 
enjoys the class. 

"I go just about every time I 
can- Mondays, Wednesdays, and 
Saturdays," Wilson said. "I really- 
like it because it's up-tempo, fun, 
and you kind of forget you're even 
exercising!" 

Zumba is a fitness progress that 
welcomes anyone regardless of sex, 
age or fitness level. 

Zumba is held in the WRAC's 
gym on Mondays and Wednesdays 
at 5:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 10 
a.m. Come check it out! 




Jacob 
Labutka 

Fashion 
Columnist 



At the very least, the majority 7 
of college students take a 
shower and (hopefully) put 
on deodorant to not smell like they 
just came out of The Body. 

However, I must insist that it is 
good for one's own senses and those 
of others around to apply what I 
will hereby deem "the smell good" " 

A pleasant fragrance emanating 
from oneself is more than the dryer 
sheets that make your clothes smell 
like lavender or a summer's breeze 
(though that certainly helps). 

There are a wide variety of body 
sprays and perfumes just waiting to 
be bought, but one must not be too 
hasty in making this purchase. 

Any savvy scent shopper cannot 
pass up one particular store: the 
paradise that is Bath & Body 
Works. 

The girl looking to breeze by a 
crowd and leave behind the scent 
of a tropical paradise (or the guy 
looking to leave behind smell of 
Noir) can feel as good they smell by 
participating in the store's buy two 
get one free sale. 

No matter where you find your 
body sprays, they will typically be 
the cheaper options. Several mists 
from the bottle wii Jo the trick, 
but unfortunately, th i power of this 
smell will more thai, likely diminish 
in about an hour. Thus, your 
next option is buying fragrances 
typically sold in department stores. 

Even Fergie knows that "Dolce 
& Gabbana, Fendi and that Donna 
Karan" are some of the market's 



best fragrances. 

Anyone that wants to turn the 
heads of prospective suitors must 
be able to properly shop through the 
fragrance department. 

Do not be deceived by the pretty 
bottles and fancy shelves because 
not all fragrances were created 
equal. However, much of how a 
fragrance smells on you depends on 
your body chemistry. 

Many scents in the Clinique 
collection smell absolutely amazing 
(especially the Get Happy gift set 
I alluded to in my last column). 
However, fragrance lines like 
Clinique have a lighter flowery 
base, and the scent will wear off 
within an hour for those of us like 
myself with body chemistries that 
resist cosmetic scents. 

There are designers such as 
D&G and Armani whose fragrances 
smell incredible and fight skin that 
resists foreign smell goods. 

Celebrities have even gotten in 
on the fragrance franchise with all 
of your favorites expanding their 
brand with a fragrance. 

Sarah Jessica Parker's 
fragrances, Lovely and Covet are 
bestsellers. Even Britney Spears' 
scents are still flying off the shelves. 
Whether you go with your favorite 
designer fragrance or something by 
your favorite celeb, you can't go 
wTong. 

Although these designers 
come at a hefty price, they have a 
stronger base, which means that it 
only takes a spray or two to have a 
lasting scent, and the amount in the 
fragrance bottle will last longer. 

To sum it all up: apply a mist 
of body spray if you intend to 
go out for an hour or spray some 
dependable designer fragrance to 
stay as fresh as you would be after 
a shower. 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"Safe House" 

Rated R 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"The Vow" 

Rated PG-13 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"Chronicle (2012/1)" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"W "The Grey" 

Rated R 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Journey 2" JF 

Rated PG 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"One for the Money" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 




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Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
February 15, 2012 



Rants: Buying 
your friends 




Tom H. Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



I 



heard recently 
that Facebook 
will be selling 
stock to the public soon. Forbes 
Magazine and the Wall Street 
Journal report that the company 
plans to go public in the second 
quarter of this year (April to June). 

The question that remains 
is now: "Should I buy stock in 
Facebook?" 

I would be hesitant to buy, 
but let me say that I am in no way 
a financial guru. I should not be 
held accountable if you base your 



We need writers! 



investments off of advice from my 
column. 

The reason I would be hesitant 
to buy is because Facebook does not 
offer a tangible product. It provides 
the ability to participate in a virtual 
world of friends, but little else. 

Neither does it rely on resources 
other than electricity and the 
company's employees. It seems that 
Facebook, if it soon becomes a part 
of the public market, would have no 
real connection to any other sector. 

Also, its leader is a college 
drop-out (albeit, one from Harvard.) 
By May I will be one up on 
Zuckerberg. Go me. 

However, as I read through 



these articles, the question then 
changes from buying this stock 
(since there is no way in heck 
I could afford it) to the success 
of going public for Facebook in 
general. 

Both of the previously 
mentioned articles in the Wall 
Street Journal and Forbes Magazine 
reported that Groupon (remember 
that ol' thing?) is down and that the 
online business director.' LinkedIN 
is also down. So what might that 
mean in regard to Facebook's 
emergence in the public market? 

I do not think it will be a big 
flop, but I cannot imagine that it 
will stay the next hottest thing out 
there. Most of the stock exchange 
is based on emotion anyway. Like 
the two other sites above (Groupon 
actually sold a product I ought to 
mention), it will spike in the first 
few months, or even a year, but it 
will be coming down soon enough. 

It is the way the market works. 

Less importantly, I would love 



to see Zuckerberg's baby come 
crashing and burning. Something 
about him just makes my skin crawl 
and bowels burn. 

But say that all of us were able 
to buy stock, would we want to? 

Owning a piece of Facebook 
would be like owning you and your 
friend's good memories and times. 
When you read this and go message 
a friend about a party later, that 
would be your money right there. 
You would own a piece of that. 

Imagine going out for coffee 
with someone and 'owning' that 
experience. It freaks me out just 
thinking about it. 

Like I said, I am not a financial 
guru, and there are many questions 
about the role of the virtual world 
still needing answers. What 
Facebook wants to do with its 
money is, I suppose, its business. 

The last question is: should 
Facebook be our business? 



Our newspaper needs stories 
written by students. 
Come by our office, 227 Kyser, 
if you would like to join. 

Meetings every Monday at 6 
p.m. We hope to hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



Weekly SUDOKU 



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GurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 




Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 





Waitresses 
deserve respect 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
Editor 



Tl wo weeks ago I got a new 
job as a waitress and for the 
most part 1 have a pretty good 
thing going for me. Sure, I get paid 
a "waitress's salary," but the tips 
make up for that. 

The only complaint I have 
to lodge is that a (very) small 
percentage of people seem to have 
misunderstandings about waitresses. 

The first misunderstanding is 
that we are perfect. If a customer 
corrects me when I take out their 
food ("I ordered another side with 
this!") or something along those 
lines, I've learned to serenely 
apologize for my mistake, if it was 
my fault or not. 

I have no problem with this, 
but it seems that the customers can 
sometimes that I make mistakes. 
When I make a mistake (I might 
forget to bring out your glass of ice 
or hand you the wrong food) you 
can't condemn me. I'm human and 
just as fallible as you are. When I 
listen to your whispered order over 
the din of a nearby party, I may err. 

My next, and biggest, complaint 
is about how waitresses are treated 



by some people. I'm not saying 
all people, because the majority of 
customers are wonderful to me, but 
one or two people can ruin it. 

I'll have a conversation with you 
if you'd like. I don't mind getting 
to know the customers if I'm not 
busy. I just cannot stand one more 
person calling me "babe" or telling 
me dirty jokes. If it happens again, 
I feel like I'm going to scream the 
injustice. 

What gives someone the right 
to make lewd comments to me 
as I bring out their iced tea? Is it 
because I'm reliant on them for 
tips? It's sad that it has only been 
three weeks, yet I'm already tired of 
this happening to me. 

I am not here to amuse 
you. I'm here to serve as your 
communication between the dining 
area and the kitchen. 

So please, don't tell me or any 
of the other people I work with 
that you "like the way we move" 
or, heaven forbid, ask us to dinner 
(again). It's inappropriate and 
makes us feel slimy and gross. 

I just wish there was a way that 
I could force these few people to 
treat me like they would a daughter 
(or a granddaughter, in the case 
of the old man that has 1,1 ide P'^e 
comments tow . I 
fellow waitresses). 



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The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 
. www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
February 15, 2012 



NSU bats explode in win over Grambling 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Highlighted by a two-run 
homer by Tiffany Ward, the 
Northwestern State softball 
team saw its bats come to life against 
Grambling State on Sunday, as the 
Lady Demons went on to win 10-1 
in five innings in the final game of 
the ULM Mardi Gras Classic. 

"We had much better decision- 
making at the plate in this game," 
said head coach Donald Pickett. 
"We were more relaxed in the bat- 
ter's box, and didn't put too much 
pressure on ourselves or try to do too 
much." 

NSU (2-3) had only scored a 
combined nine runs in its opening 
four games, but found its rhythm at 
the plate against GSU (0-5). Kylie 
Roos (1-2) picked up the win, while 
Angela Perez (0-4) took the loss. 
Roos threw four innings, letting up 
just one run on one hit and struckout 
four. 

"Kylie really came out and set 
the tone on the mound. She threw the 
ball the way that she normally does," 
Pickett said. 

Cassandra Barefield, Blair Beard 
and Cali Burke all registered multi- 
hit games, as the Lady Demons out- 
hit the Tigers 10-1. Barefield also 
brought in three RBI, while Ward's 
big blast counted for two. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Tiffany Ward makes good contact with the ball. She had two homeruns in win over Grambling State. 



"Our girl's were able to take ad- 
vantage of some good pitches to hit. 
We saw the ball well, and just con- 
tinued to push those runs across," 
Pickett said. 

In the top of the 1st inning, GSU's 
leadoff hitter was hit by a pitch, 
and advanced to third after a couple 
groundouts. GSU clean-up hitter 
Amanda Lester then singled in the 
run to give the Tigers the early ad- 
vantage- 1-0 GSU. 
The Lady Demons had a big re- 



sponse in the bottom half, as Tara 
McKenney started it off with a walk 
and stole second. Jordan Palmer fol- 
lowed with a single up the middle, 
and advanced to second on the throw 
as McKenney moved to third. Brit- 
tany Virgoe tallied a RBI ground- 
out, scoring McKenney and pushing 
Palmer to third. Samantha Roberts 
then notched a RBI single to center- 
field, scoring Palmer. 

Still in the first, Roos walked and 
Beard singled to lettfield to get Rob- 



erts to third, and loaded the bases. 
Barefield then came through with a 
2 RBI single to right-center, scoring 
Roos and Roberts - 4-1 NSU. 

NSU continued to pour it on in 
the 3rd, as Roos got it started with 
a leadoff walk. She then moved to 
second on a wild pitch and advanced 
to third on a groundout. Barefield 
picked up a RBI single to left field, 
which led to Ward's damaging cen- 
terfield homer. 

"It was a big hit and it definitely 



opened up the game a little bit for us. 
She was looking for a good pitch to 
drive, and she came through," Pick- 
ett said on Ward's home run. "It's 
big for a senior to step up like that 
and put a team away when we had 
the chance to do so." 
Though the Lady Demons weren't 
done yet in the frame, as Burke 
reached on an infield single and ad- 
vanced to second when McKenney 
w alked. Virgoe then notched her sec- 
ond RBI of the game with a single 
to right-center, scoring Burke - 8-1 
NSU. 

Continuing to apply pressure in the 
4th, Beard smashed a double down 
the right field line, and scored on the 
next play when Ward reached sec- 
ond on a fielding error. Burke then 
singled to center to score Ward - 
10-1 NSU. 

Sara Aasness came in and pitched 
a perfect inning of relief, striking out 
the side in the 5th inning before the 
mercy rule was applied. 

"We still have a lot of work to 
do before we get to where we need 
to be," Pickett said. "We're a good 
team, we just have to keep working 
hard and improving each time we 
take the field." 

NSU will look to keep the bats 
going on Wednesday when it plays 
its home opener against Jackson 
State at 4 p.m. at the Lady Demon 
Diamond Complex. 



Upcoming Games 




Home Game 
Jackson State Feb. 16 

ULL Mardi Grad 
Classic 

vs. LA Tech Feb. 17 
vs. North Carolina Feb. 17 
vs. ULL Feb. 18 

vs. Texas-El Paso p e j J> 1 9 
vs. Northwestern p e b 1 9 
vs Bahylor (DH) Feb. 21 



NORTH WtSTER^ 




NSU continues to slide: Cowboys hand Demons third straight loss 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Louis Ellis makes a tough shot over a McNeese defender. Demons lost its third straight game. 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Patrick Richard's 20 points and 
a commanding 5 1 -33 rebound- 
ing advantage spurred red-hot 
McNeese State over a suddenly- 
struggling Northwestern State bas- 
ketball team Monday night in a 70- 
61 Southland Conference basketball 
game before 2,233 at Prather Coli- 
seum. 

The Cowboys (13-10 overall, 9-2 
in the Southland) won their sixth in a 
row since falling 64-61 on Jan. 21 to 
Northwestern at home. The Demons 
(14-12, 7-5) dropped their third in a 
row after a five-game winning streak 
that began with the last-second tri- 
umph at McNeese. 

Dontae Cannon added 1 7 points 
while Rudy Turner posted 10 points 
and a game-best 12 rebounds. Mc- 
Neese shot 46 percent overall as 



Northwestern made only 33 percent 
of its shots. 

Shamir Davis, making 7 of 9 free 
throws, topped NSU with 1 3 points 
while Louis Ellis scored 10. 

NSU senior center William Mos- 
ley blocked three shots and movecl 
into the NCAA career top 1 in thai 
category. He passed New Orleans 
Hornets' center Emeka Okafor, who 
had 441 at Connecticut from 2001- 
04; Deng Gai of Fairfield, who had 
442 from 2000-05; and tied Shawn 
James, who swatted 443 while 
playing for both Northeastern and 
Duquesne in a career that ended in 
2008. 

Mosley is one block away from 
tying Ohio State's Ken Johnson, 
who finished his career with 444 in 
200 1 , and needs 1 to move into fifth 
place all-time, matching George- 
town great Alonzo Mourning's 453 
from 1987-92. 



The Cowboys never trailed, lead- 
ing 33-25 at halftime and scoring the 
first six points of the second half to 
create a double-digit advantage they 
maintained until the final half-min- 
ute. The Demons fell behind by as 
many as 22 points at 60-38 with 7:02 
to go. 

"First, McNeese played very 
well," said Demons' coach Mike 
McConathy. "They have the same 
kind of swagger and flow that we 
had just over a week ago. They are 
playing smart, tough basketball. 
We're trying real hard, but we're in a 
rough patch. I was proud of how we 
battled to stay in it tonight." 

The Demons are off until a non- 
conference Sears BracketBusters 
game at 2:30 Saturday afternoon in 
Prather Coliseum against Campbell. 
NSU's next conference game is at 
home Feb. 22 against Sam Houston 
State. 



Student Media Leaders Needed 

Annual positions open starting summer 2012 

• Argus Editor-in-Chief 

• Current Sauce Editor-in-Chief 

• Potpourri Editor-in-Chief 

• KNWD General Manager 



Applications available for 
Potpourri and Current Sauce in Kyser Hall, RM 225 
Argus RM 316G or 316N 
KNWD RM 31 6D 



Deadline to submit applications: 

March 28 

Scholarships Available 

For more information, contact: 
Argus: Dr. Julie Kane, kanej@nsula.edu 
Current Sauce: Dr. Paula Furr, furrp@nsula.edu 
Potpourri: Mrs. Stephanie Masson, massons@nsula.edu 
KNWD: Arthur Dew, dewa@nsula.edu 




Nic Russo, a communications senior and Demon football punter, airs a bloopers segment of his show. Log 
on to YouTube and search for "demonkicker18" for more episodes of "The Nic Russo Show." 

Demon football players hosts popular YouTube Show 



Alexis Reliford 

Staff Reporter 

Behind a helmet, shoulder 
pads and a Demon jersey is 
a student with a thing for a 
video camera. 

"The Nic Russo Show" has been 
reaching viewers across NSU's 
campus for about a year and is 
hosted by Demon senior football 
player Nicolas Russo. 

The show covers a variety of 
topics with segments about sports, 
relationships and college life in 
general. 

"I made a video one time 
talking about Spring Break, and the 



response I got was overwhelming," 
Russo said. "I figured since I like 
being in front of a camera, and I 
like to make people laugh, I could 
do it on a weekly basis." 

The communication major uses 
social networking sites such as 
Facebook and Twitter to advertise 
his show as well as word of mouth. 
What other fun way is there to 
advertise this fast growing show? 

"I even have shirts that I'm 
selling that have The Nic Russo 
Show logo and my face on it," 
Russo said. 

Each episode of "The Nic Russo 
Show" has well over a hundred 
view s, and the number of hits is 



rapidly growing. Russo hopes to see 
his show expand in the near future 
and his fan base grow beyond NSU 
students and family members. Who 
knows? 

The next YouTube Internet 
sensation might be currently located 
in the small town of Natchitoches. 
Russo, a kicker and punter for the 
Demon football team is a native of 
Grand Prairie, Texas. According to 
Russo, football, schoolwork and the 
show take up just about every hour 
that he is awake. 

"I'm always busy, but I am a 
true Demon fan, and you can find 
me at every Demon sporting event," 
Russo said. 




auce 

Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, February 29, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦Volume 97: Issue 18 



Field exercise tests ROTC cadets' abilities 



Andrew Bordelon 
Sauce Reporter 

Many NSU students may have 
enjoyed recuperating from the 
Mardi Gras holidays by waking 
up late, grabbing a big lunch and 
continuing on with the semester and 
their afternoon classes. 

But a small, select group of 
students had different plans as they 
woke up early Wednesday morning 
and prepared to be physically and 
mentally tested. 

NSU ROTC cadets headed to 
Camp McCain. MS. to participate 
in the Joint Field Training Exercise 
with 1 7 other schools in the 
southeastern region. They prepared 
for their final test this summer, 
the Leadership Development and 
Assessment Course, or LDAC. 

The cadets began their training 
with the Army Physical Fitness 
Test, or APFT, consisting of three 
events: push-ups, sit-ups and a 
two-mile run. Junior nursing major 
Joyce Cummings was the highest 
scoring cadet for NSU, earning a 
total of 281 points on a scale of 300. 

Next, cadets took a written land 
navigation exam that tested their 
know ledge of map reading and their 
ability to locate specific points on 
a map. 

Once the written tests were 
completed, the cadets headed into 
the several thousands of acres 
of thick Mississippi woods to 
demonstrate their competence in a 
hands-on test. They were required 
to find at least five of the eight grid 
coordinates, or points, given to 
them. Cadets had only five hours 
to complete the day-time navigation 
course using just a map and a 
compass. 




Brett Guse, senior engineering major pulls security in a patrol base during a squad tactical exercise lane. 



Meals Ready to Eat, or MRE's, 
helped revive cadets while 
recuperating from the hours of 
locating points. Then, the time came 
for their next challenge. 

Darkness fell over the thick 
woodland hills as cadets prepared 
for the last part of their navigation 
test, which required them to locate 
at least three out of five points in 
just three hours in the black, cloud- 
covered night. 

Junior secondary education 
major Bradley Hubbs passed all 



three of the land navigation tests 
on his first attempt. He explained 
how much of a challenge the terrain 
and distance heTiad to overcome to 
complete the hands-on course. 

"You could not take your time on 
anything because the distance from 
points was so great," Hubbs said. 
"The terrain was bad too." 

Hubbs added that large patches 
of thorn bushes and stretches of 
creek beds added to the challenge 
and even delayed vital time trying 
to move from point to point. 



Cadets settled down in several 
small areas in the woods that they 
had to keep secure themselves. 
These patrol bases taught them 
how to maintain a secure area and 
organize their teams into groups that 
would rotate turns to eat, sleep and 
pull security. 

Finally, cadets participated in 
a dozen Squad Tactical Exercises, 
or STX Lanes in order to test their 
leadership abilities in a simulated 
combat scenario. 



I MM 

Photo by Andrew Bordelon 

They must utilize battle drills 
used by active duty soldiers while 
maintaining control of an eleven- 
person squad. Experienced army 
officers and enlisted soldiers 
evaluated each cadet in leadership 
dimensions relevant to their 
future careers as officers, such 
as: confidence, interpersonal 
tact, physical fitness, and sound 
judgment to name just a few. 

"The lane was challenging 
especially because we were with 
people from other schools who 



aren't used to the same tactics we 
use." Brittany Jeanice, senior health 
and exercise science major, said. 

Jeanice is going to LDAC for 
the second time due to changing her 
major, and she stated she feels more 
pressure on herself to do better 
because of her experience. Cadets 
have two years to graduate after 
passing the course or must return to 
take it again. 

"The hardest part of it for me 
w as maintaining control over eleven 
different people with different 
personalities," Jeanice said. 

Jeanice's performance did not 
go unnoticed. Major John Carvan, 
the Executiv e Commander of the 
Demon Battalion at NSU, received 
comments from Jeanice's evaluator 
on her STX Lane, stating she 
was one of the best cadets he had 
evaluated. 

Major Carvan stated the purpose 
of the exercise is to gain an honest 
assessment of the cadets' abilities 
prior to attending LDAC. Cadets 
were also competing against other 
schools in the region while training. 

"The [staff] is exceptionally 
proud of the NSU cadets' ability to 
compete against nationally ranked 
schools like LSU, University of 
Alabama and Mississippi State 
University," Major Carvan said. 

NSU's scores were on par with 
some schools that brought more 
than twice the amount of students to 
the exercise. 

"They did a great job holding 
their ground," he added. 

Now the cadets will learn from 
their accomplishments and mistakes 
made during the training and build 
on that knowledge before leaving 
for LDAC. 



Magale Recital Hall renovations underway 



J. C. Bryants 

Sauce Reporter 

Magale Recital Hall is con- 
tinuing to undergo reno- 
vations to modernize the 
building. 
Dr. Burt Allen, professor and Co- 
ordinator of Music, is excited to see 
the renovations come into fruition 
in the Creative and Performing Arts 
Building (commonly referred to as 
CAPA). 

"These renovations have been on 
the drawing board for years," Allen 
said. 

"It's just really nice to walk into 
the [Magale] Recital Hall and see 
nice, new carpet and a refinished 



stage," Allen added. 

The renovations began last sum- 
mer with the replacement of the 
large stage curtain in Magale Recital 
Hall. The curtain was old and faded, 
and it was actually the original cur- 
tain from when the building was first 
built in 1982-1983. 

In addition to the new stage cur- 
tain, the original 1980s recital hall 
carpet was also replaced. The old 
carpet was ripped, stained, WTinkled, 
and according to Allen, "capable of 
tripping people if they weren't pay- 
ing attention." 

Magale's stage was also resur- 
faced, as it w ent through nearly thirty 
years of traffic and the transportation 
of music stands and instruments. 

Magale Recital Hall was not the 



only part of CAPA to see new reno- 
vations. 

Nearly all of the carpet in CAPA 
has been replaced with new textured 
design carpet. 

Also, the percussion studio will 
have a new addition of practice 
rooms. There was once a spacious 
and sparsely used art room near the 
percussion studio. 

This room is now being convert- 
ed into practice rooms specifically to 
be used by percussion students. The 
dimensions of each room are geared 
to facilitate ease in moving larger 
instruments, such as five-octave ma- 
rimbas and timpani. 

According to Ken Green, Director 
of Percussion, these practice rooms 



should be finished by the end of this 
semester. 

Students are already appreciative 
of CAPA's renovations. 

"I'm really excited to have these 
practice rooms", Nathan Glassy, a 
percussion student, said. 

"It'll be nice to have somewhere 
other than the hallway to practice 
marimba," Glassy added. 

The only renovation left to be 
completed in Magale is the install- 
ment of handrails along the stairs to 
improve safety while navigating to 
seats, especially for the eldery. 

Dr. Allen is thankful that NSU 
is helping keep the Creative and 
Performing Arts building fresh and 
modem. 



t^Ti — r 




Lin-sanity flavor deemed racist: 

Ben & Jerry's ice cream are remov- 
ing the fortune cookies from their 
new ice cream flavor, Lin-sanity, 
based on the popular Asian-Ameri- 
can NBA star. 

School shooting in Ohio high 
school: A student gunman killed 
one person and injured four with a 



handgun in an Ohio school cafete- 
ria on Monday. 

Maryland to legalize gay mar- 
riage: The governor of Maryland 
intends to sign a bill this Thursday 
making same-sex marriage legal. 
This will be the eighth state to 
legalize gay marriage. 

2012 Oscar winners: Best Pic- 
ture: The Artist 



Best Actor: Jean Dujardin {The 
Artist) 

Best Actress in Leading Role: 

Meryl Streep ( The Iron Lady) 
Best Directing: Micheal Hazanavi 
cius ( Tlie Artist), 
Best Animated Film: Rango 
Best Cinematography: Hugo 
Best Original Song "Man or a 
Muppet" from The Muppets by Brdt 
McKenzie 



University to host State Jazz Festival 




News Bureau 

Northwestern State University hosts the annual Louisiana 
Association of Jazz Educators State Jazz Festival Saturday, 
March 3 in Magale Recital Hall. Admission is free and open 
to the public. High school and middle school jazz ensembles 
from throughout Louisiana will perform along with groups 
from Northwestern State, McNeese State and the University 
of Arkansas-Monticel to. 



Index 1 


Wednesday 

81759° 


Thursday 

80766° 


Friday 

79751° 


Saturday 

67741° 


Sunday 

72742° 


Monday 

73748° 


Tuesday 

70756° 


2 


Life 


3 


Opinions 


ML 














4 


Sports 


















Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
February 29, 2012 



Students laugh night away at first 'NSU Kings of Comedy' show Lincoln i 11 Q EVGDtS 

Aneela Owusu-Duku helped set the stage for upcoming | t t u j i i 



Angela Owusu-Duku 

Sauce Reporter 

Two professional comedians 
helped NSU students chuckle at 
real-life issues last Thursday at 
"NSU's Kings of Comedy" hosted 
by the Student Activities Board. 

One of the comedians was 
Marcus Harvey, the 2012 winner 
of the Gospel Choice Awards for 
Comedian of the Year. His comedic 
style puts a funny spin on everyday- 
issues. 

The second entertainer was Drew 
Fraser, who has been featured on 
"Def Comedy Jam'*and P. Diddy's 
"Bad Boys of Comedy." His 
comedy deals with realistic issues 
involving race and relationships. 

NSU's event was inspired by the 
2000 comedy film, "The Original 
Kings of Comedy" which featured 
four famous comedians: Steve 
Harvey, D.L. Hugley, Bemie Mac 
and Cedric ihe Entertainer. They 



helped set the stage for upcoming 
comedians like Harvey and Fraser. 

SAB used social media to 
publicize this larger event. 

"We have done public relations 
as far as updating our Twitter and 
Student Messenger," Afton Owens, 
a senior education major and special 
events coordinator for SAB, said. 

Harvey, one of the comedians, 
tweeted about his successful visit 
to NSU: "Northwestern State, you 
guys rock. Northwestern was great 
to your boy. I can*t wait to come 
back." 

More than 60 students attended 
the event. One of those students 
who attended was Jordan White, a 
junior mass communications major. 

"I saw the advertisement on 
Twitter and my friend invited me 
to go," White said. "I did enjoy 
myself." 

For information about upcoming 
SAB events, visit www.nsula.edu or 
follow on Twitter @NSUSAB. 




Submitted photo 
SAP representatives pose with Marcus Harvey and Drew Faser. 



SAB wants to know: 




Alexis Reliford 

Sauce Reporter 

While sitting in core classes 
freshman year, most students think, 
"When am I ever going to actually 
use this again?" After studying 
hard for months to pass exams, 
students sometimes throw the 
basic knowledge out the window 
thinking it'll never be used again. 
Yet, sometimes holding onto that 
freshman year knowledge has its 
advantages. 

On Tuesday March 6, the Student 
Activities Board is hosting "Are you 
Smarter than a Freshman?" It will be 
much like the popular FOX Network 
game show "Are You Smarter than 



a 5* Grader," but with a few slight 
twists. Students of all classifications 
will be competing for the top grand 
prize: a new HP Touchsmart 320 
computer, valued at over $700. 

"I encourage every student that 
is interested to prep for this event 
because it is going to be intense," 
Ryan Owens, host and SAB 
Freshman Factor Committee head, 
said. 

According to Owens, students 
who want to compete in the game 
show should prepare by reviewing 
the basic curriculum of freshman 
English, math, science and history 
courses. For many students this 
may require reaching back quite a 
few years as many of the courses 



are usually completed during the 
freshman and sophomore years. 
In addition to the chance of walking 
away with a new computer, students 
also have the opportunity to win an 
array of other prizes provided by 
SAB. 

This is definitely is not the first 
time SAB has given away lavish 
prizes. At previous events, students 
have won Wii game systems, cash, 
and Apple TVs. 

Keith Domingue, a senior biology 
major thinks the event will be better 
than last year and wishes more 
students would take advantage of 
events on campus already paid for 
by their student association fees. 

"Too many students let great 



opportunities go by and say they 
didn't know about it. Well, now 
you know! I know I'll be there. 
Who doesn't want a brand new 
computer?," Domingue said. 

SAB members are hoping to see 
a nice turn-out in preparation for the 
upcoming Spring Fling week. 

So come out and put what you 
know to the test. You may even win 
a prize for your knowledge. 

"Are You Smarter than a Freshman" 
will be held in the Student Union 
Alley at 7 p.m. and is free for all 
students with a current NSU student 
I.D. 

Don't miss out on this great 
opportunity to connect with your 
student body and SAB! 




Fashion spotlight: Randi Ditta 



Randi Ditta 



Jacob Labutka 

Fashion Columnist 

I have a great interest in 
people who choose outfits that are 
something more than cute. 

For some, style is a unique 
characterization of their personality 
that does not follow trends-but 
instead inspires new trends. 

For sophomore Randi Ditta, 
every outfit in her closet reveals 
something about her soft spoken, 
yet bold personality. The 
uniqueness of her dress matches her 
taste in life and attractive features, 
like big hair worn by Louis XIV. 

Her featured outfit for this 
column starts with a fluffed white 
blouse lined with bows to match her 
white head bow. Ditta purchased 
both the head bow and blouse at an 
online store called Bodyline. 

Her blouse is covered with 
two red and white plaid straps 
that lead to her skirt which is 
subtly knit with a heart-topped 
pocket. Ditta's secondhand Angelic 
Pretty skirt (Ditta notes that this 
brand is inspired from a Japanese 
street fashion known as Lolita) 



was bought online at the Sales 
Community Live Journal. 

One of my favorite things to 
shop for is probably my favorite 
part of this outfit: shoes. Purchased 
from a seller on eBay, the white 
boots are the fashionable finish to 
this outfit. 

A lesson to learn here is that 
fashionable attire can be purchased 
from places other than the mall 
or a retailer website. The most 
random places may have the perfect 
clothes that are best for your self- 
expression (which for Ditta happens 
to be at foreign online retailers). 

Once you fully appreciate 
the flowy fashion of her plaid 
skirt, Randi will switch it up and 
characterize another side of her 
personality that loves more than the 
red and white of a picnic. 

She may wear anything from 
a light blue dress illustrated with 
delicious candies to a Star Wars 
hoodie. 

No matter what savvy attire 
Randi chooses, all she needs is a 
smile, a few bows and her rabbit, 
Detective Humbert hanging at her 
side. 



African American Caucus 

"Black Achievement Awards" 

Magale Recital Hall 
Wednesday Feb. 29 at 6 p.m. 

NSU Demon Basketball Game 

"NSU v. Nicholls State" 
Prather Coliseum 
Wednesday Feb. 29 at 7 p.m. 

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc 

"My PreZident is Black" 
Student Union Alley 
Thursday March 1 at 6:20 p.m. 

Northwestern State University 

25th j annual Research Day 

Application Deadline 
Monday March 12 



Parkway Cinema 

1011 Keyser Avenue 

"Act of Valor" 

Rated R 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"This Means War" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 

"The Vow" 

Rated PG-13 
4:20 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 

"Tyler p ^^| "P ood 

Rated PG-13 
4:10 p.m. 6:50 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

"Journey 2" 

Rated PG 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:20 p.m. 

rt^y 'Ghost Rider 2"/ST 

Rated PG-13 
4:30 p.m. 7:10 p.m. 9:40 p.m. 



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Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
February 29, 2012 



Mardi Gras: mambo, mambo and repent 




Tom H. Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



I 



t is Mardi 
Gras season 
and I sure am 
ready to eat a few pieces of King 
Cake, drink an adult beverage for 
all the times I could not and watch 
foreigners (Midwesterners, West 
Coast Folk and Yankees) do stupid 
things for plastic. 

Normally in this section it is 
the case that I rant and scold the 
ridiculous and impracticality of the 
holidays and those who celebrate 



them. However. Mardi Gras is 
an exception. It is supposed to be 
ridiculous. Mardi Gras always has 
and still does mark the end of good 
times for 40 days until Easter. 

Nearly needless to say, I grew up 
in southern Louisiana as a Catholic 
with an Irish family name and a 
Cajun mother. I was doomed from 
the start. The months of February 
and March of my childhood were 
always bipolar. 

Thankfully, we did get one 
reprieve during the 40 days of 
wandering in the dessert when Saint 
Patrick's Day came around, but that 
is an entirely different article that 



I'll save for another 
time. 

My opinion of 
Mardi Gras and 
Lent have always 
been that of a 
desperate attempt 
to please both sides 
of the spiritual 
dialectic: Heaven 
and Hell. 

Some years it 
seemed that the 

only things (only substantial things, 
mind you) I had to go to Confession 
for were things that happened on 
Fat Monday and Tuesday, like 




returning to NSU 
on Ash Wednesday 
with an excuse 
from Oschner 
Medical clinic 
in New Orleans. 
Whoops. 

I suppose I 
could have saved 
myself some 
time by looking 
upwards and 
apologizing. 
My favorite memories of Mardi 
Gras involve the lower caste and 
class of Bourbon Street where I 
passed out in front of Cathedrale 



Saint-Louis, and also of a drunk 
priest w ho presided over an Ash 
Wednesday service when I was a 
lad. The memories warm my heart 
just thinking about them. 

I realize that I am not helping 
to disprove the old Catholic, Irish, 
Cajun and Louisiana stereotypes. 
But realize that everyone else, be 
they of any race, creed or region, 
looks damn foolish during Mardi 
Gras. 

It is the Saturnalia of our own 
time. Who knows, this might even 
be the very last time we celebrate it. 
Maybe we can tilt our heads back 
and ask for one more year. 



Other than this dichotomy, I have 
always been proud of Mardi Gras 
for putting our Louisiana on the 
map for something good (but not 
morally good perhaps, like Devil's 
Food Cake or something). 

Our little state is unique. 
There are several Texases, a 
bunch of Nebraskas and a slew of 
Connecticuts. But no state in this 
union is quite like Louisiana. 

So I hope you celebrate your 
spiritual burden, ridiculousness 
and our noble land well this year. 
Laissez les bons temps rouler! 



Appreciate the art by saying no to music piracy 




Ty Johnson 

Practicum 
Student 



Music 
piracy 

encourages a culture of criminality. 
Although fans don't seem to view 
illegally downloading music online 
to be the same as stealing CDs from 
a store, it is, in essence, the same 
thing. 

Music piracy promotes 
criminality because people will 
continue to download copyrighted 



music without paying for it, and 
there are those that make entire 
albums accessible to download to 
not only themselves, but also to the 
masses. 

File sharing 
sites like 
Lime Wire and 
Neptune are good 
examples of the 
tools that have 
enabled a culture 
of criminality 
because 
thousands of 

people download copyrighted 
material without paying for it using 




those sites. 

One of the key points customers 
make about downloading music 
make is record executives should 
provide samples 
for them to listen to 
before they purchase 
them so they can 
decide if they want 
to spend money or 
not. 

Another key point 
is that perhaps 
declining music 
sales aren't because 
of music piracy but because of 
economical issues. 

How can the music industry 



pinpoint all the blame on music 
piracy if there are other factors that 
could cause the declining sales? 

Perhaps the majority of those 
that illegally download music are 
the ones who cannot buy the music 
anyway because they have little 
money? In that case, the music sales 
are not as affected by music piracy 
as they've claimed. Maybe it's just 
easier to put the blame on struggling 
college students instead of the 
economy. 

In 2004, two researchers studied 
whether illegal file trading was 
responsible for reduced CD sales. 

Felix Oberholzer-Gee at Harvard 
Business School and Koleman 



Strumpf at the University of North 
Carolina concluded, "At most, file 
sharing can explain a tiny fraction 
of this decline. Based on our results, 
we do not believe file sharing will 
have a significant effect on the 
supply of recorded music." 

Despite their findings, the 
music industry frequently argues 
recording artists and record labels 
are suffering because people are 
stealing music instead of buying it 
legally. 

In March 2008, the American 
Society of Composers, Authors and 
Publishers (ASCAP) released a 
"Bill of Rights for Songwriters and 



Composers." 

One of the bills states, "We have 
the right to protect our creative 
works to the fullest extent of the law 
from all forms of piracy, theft and 
unauthorized use, which deprive us 
of our right to earn a living based on 
our creativity." 

If sales continue to decline due 
to music piracy, the music industry 
may be heading towards a dismal 
future because they're not getting 
paid for their material. 

Besides the fact that declining 
music sales could affect recording 
arti> steal i .-cop; 
is wrong- point, blank, period- no 
matter who it affects in the end. 



Invasion of materialism into all aspects of society 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
Editor 



This country seems to have a 
problem with wanting. Not 
only do I see this on a mon- 
etary level, but it has invaded every 
level of society. 

This is obvious when college stu- 
dents, like me, are more attracted to 
the idea of a new game or new items 
of clothing than to the idea of saving 
their money. 

It is hard to follow the goals set 
before you when it appears as if ev- 
eryone has something bigger, better 
and newer. This is where the idea 
of "keeping up with the Joneses'" 



comes into play. 

The commercial industry feeds us 
lies that say we will not be happy un- 
less we have A, B or C. It even cov- 
ers the ground of people who are not 
involved in mainstream society. 

Those who think they are above 
the pressure are usually just finding 
alternative ways to submit to it (if I 
save 'x' amount of money, then I will 
reward myself with a new purse). 

As I said before, this idea of 
"brand name" culture has spread to 
every level of society. Food, technol- 
ogy and clothes are better if they are 
brand name items. Heck, even ani- 
mals are better brand name. 

A woman was looking to buy a 
dog in a local Facebook group- 
documentation for this dog was not 
necessary. 

This dog was for a young rela- 
tive to have, but she posted a warn- 



ing that she "sure don't want a mutt" 
after a few people informed her that 
it was unlikely to find a pure blood 
Husky at Natchitoches' animal shel- 
ter, Hope for Paws. 

If this dog isn't for breeding pur- 
poses and will only act as a pet to 
love the child in question, why does 
it matter if it is a pure Husky? 

A mixed breed dog is just as ca- 
pable of loving its owner, and in 
some research mixed breeds have 
been shown to live longer with less 
defects. 

An escape from the inbreeding 
that comes with being a "pure bred 
dog" can do that to you. 

Now I do not want any of my 
readers to think that I am knocking 
off all brand name items. With all 
items there is the option of choosing 
between quality and quantity. 

Brand name items are often high- 



er quality and off-brand items have 
a reputation of being lower quality. 

There is a fine line between qual- 
ity and quantity with every item. You 
do not have to fork out the big bucks 
for an item if there is a lesser-known 
brand with almost the same quality. 

Or, in the case of clothing, there 
are many websites that offer ways to 
recreate classic brands like Anthro- 
pologic by using thrift store clothes 
and some craft supplies. 

On a basic level, people can begin 
to reject items that are only wanted 
because they are brand name. They 
can put more thought into what they 
want and, ultimately, what they buy. 

So I just ask that people take more 
responsibility when it comes to their 
finances. I am trying to accomplish 
this as well with a very helpful bud- 
geting website: www.eebacanhelp. 
com. 



CurrentSauce 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 




Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



ACROSS 

1 Six-pack 
muscles 
4 "Huh?" 
8 Slender 

12 Speck 

13 Ginormous 

1 4 Last few 
notes 

15 Good poker 
hand 

17 Stead 

18 Possess 

19 Weapon 
collection 

21 San 

Fernando, 
for one 

24 Melody 

25 Have a bug 

26 Witnessed 
28 Stickum 
32 March 1 5, 

eg. 

34 Central 

36 Bring to a 
halt 

37 Bold 
39 Roscoe 

41 Regret 

42 Conger, e.g. 
44 Coy 

46 Puts in the 
wrong place 

50 Tatter 

51 Help slyly 

52 Vigor 

56 Paddock 
papa 

57 "My bad" 



1 


2 


3 


1 




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= 


1 


• 










58 






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60 








1 


61 







58 Writer 
Buscaglia 

59 Despot 

60 Dalai - 

61 Tackle's 
teammate 

DOWN 



Billboards 
Automaton, 
for short 
Modern-day 
pram 

Complains 

feebly 

Embrace 

Ottoman 

bigwig 



Aquarium 
fish 

Eyeball coats 
Pork cut 
Concept 
Manhandle 
1 6 Piercing tool 

20 Taste 

21 Futile 

22 Staffer 

23 Sweet 
potato kin 

27 Peruke 

29 Fight 

30 Go 
sightseeing 

31 Duel tool 
33 Less 



8 
9 
10 
11 



corpulent 
35 Old man 
38 Verily 
40 Singer 

Brewer 
43 Disinfectant 

brand 

45 Chap 

46 Spar 

47 Wading bird 

48 Antitoxins 

49 Old portico 

53 Spinning stat 

54 Coffee break 
hour 

55 Scuttle 




Trivia 

tCSt byfifi | 
Rodriguez 



1. MAPS: U.S. Interstate 10 ends in 
Los Angeles, but where does it begin 
on the East Coast? 

2. SCIENCE: In 1959, physicist 
Richard Feynman was the first to pro- 
pose what kind of technology (on a 
small scale)? 

3. LITERATURE: What was Ernest 
Hemingway 's middle name? 

4. MUSIC: What American folk- 
music group is famous for their song 
"Keep on the Sunny Side"? 

5. MEDICAL TERMS: What is a 
more common name for the medical 
condition "pruritus"? 

6. SPORTS: Where will the 2014 
Olympic Winter Games be held? 

7. ARCHITECTURE: What famous 
architect's residence in Wisconsin was 
called Taliesin? 

8. LANGUAGE: What are the com- 
parative and superlative forms of the 
word "little"? 

9. MOVIES: In "Cast Away," what 
was the name that marooned actor 
Tom Hanks (Chuck Noland) aave the 
volleyball that washed ashore? 

1 0. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capi- 
tal of Brazil? 




The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 

The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 

Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from 

anyone. All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our 

letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 



We need writers! 



Our newspaper needs stories written by students. 
Come by our office, 227 Kyser, if you would like to join. 
Meetings every Monday at 6 p.m. We hope to hear from you! 
- Current Sauce staff 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
February 29, 2012 



NSU triumphs 8-0 over TSU 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Kelee Grimes fired her second 
career no-hitter with nine 
strikeouts Sunday morning 
for the Northwestern State 
Softball team in a 8-0, six inning 
victory over Tennessee State in the 
third-place game of the Arkansas 
Fastpitch Invitational at Bogle Park. 

Grimes (2-4) was one out away 
from a perfect game for NSU (3-12) 
when she nicked Savannah Gutier- 
rez with a pitch, allowing her a free 
base. Grimes then got TSU's (4-5) 
Tedra Alford to fly out to rightfield 
to complete the 1 2th no-hitter in pro- 
gram history. 

'"Kelee was working ahead in the 
count today, and that really allowed 
her to throw a lot of different pitches 
and keep hitters off-balance. She 
was going right after hitters all day 
long and just trusted her stuff," said 
head coach Donald Pickett. 

Grimes threw her first solo no- 
hitter last season on April 6, 2011 
in a 2-0 win over Alcorn State. The 
Pineville native was also part of a 
no-no on March 9, 2010 when she 
combined with Brooke Boening and 
former Lady Demon Jessica English 
in a no-hit win over Grambling. 

"We have all the confidence in 
the world in Kelee and we know 
she's going to have a lot more per- 
formances like this one before the 
season is over," Pickett said. 

Blair Beard registered her second 
consecutive multi-hit game and her 
fourth on the year with singles in the 
fourth and sixth frames. NSU as a 
team outhit TSU 8-0. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Kelee Grimes pitches a strike against TSU to help NSU win 8-0. 



"Blair had a really good weekend 
for us. I'm not surprised at all about 
her performances over the last few 
games - this is what we expect out 
of Blair. She's a very talented player 
and she's consistently getting on 
base for us," Pickett said. 

The Lady Demons broke the game 
open in the fourth inning with a mon- 
ster, seven-run frame. Cali Burke 
and Beard each registered two-RBI 
singles to do the heavy damage. Ky- 
lie Roos and Cheyenne DeLaGarza 
also tallied RBI singles in an inning 
that featured 1 1 NSU batters at the 
plate. 

NSU added on in the fifth when Sam 
Roberts knocked a RBI single to 
rightfield with two outs and runners 
on first and second. Tara McKenney 
scored on the play. 

"We came to play today and 



we're going to build off this win," 
Pickett said. "We knew we hadn't 
been playing our best ball so far this 
season, but today we came out, re- 
laxed and played with confidence." 

Shea Morris (3-2) took the loss 
for the Tigers, allowing four earned 
runs on two hits and two walks in 
three innings. TSU committed four 
errors in the field. 

'This is the team we expected to 
have at the beginning of the season," 
Pickett said. "We were consistent all 
the way through the lineup and just 
kept battling at the plate with an ag- 
gressive approach." 

The Lady Demons will look 
to duplicate this performance on 
Wednesday when they travel to 
Houston Baptist for a doubleheader 
starting at 2. 



Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame 
goes for new look in 2013 



Malcolm Kirkendoll 

Sauce Reporter 

Next spring, restaurants won't 
be the only attractions on 
Front Street for visitors 
because the Louisiana Sports Hall 
of Fame will be the next addition 
for tourists and sport lovers. 

In spring 2013, the Louisiana 
State Museum system will open 
the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame 
Museum. 

Doug Ireland, NSU Sports 
Information Director commented on 
the museum's future location and 
size. 

"The museum will be a 27,500 
square foot building and is being 
constructed on the northern end of 
Front Street," Ireland said. 

The S20 million museum should 



be finished by mid-fall. 
Currently, the Louisiana Sports 
Hall of Fame is housed in Prather 
Coliseum at Northwestern State 
University. 

Jerry Pierce, NSU vice president 
for External Affairs and Louisiana 
Sports Writers Association co- 
chairman, had the idea to build 
a shrine for the first 4 1 honorees 
in 1971 in Prather Coliseum, the 
first formal inauguration of the 
Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame. 

"It's not only just football 
and basketball players that get 
inducted," Ireland said. "There are 
about 24 different sports that get 
looked at from the professional and 
collegiate level." 

Ireland said the induction 
process is not easy. The 30-member 
election group selects inductees. 



The requirements include being a 
Louisiana native with recognition 
outside of the state. 

If they are from out-of-state, 
they must gain recognition while 
working in Louisiana and be retired 
for at least three years. 

Eight sports figures will be 
inducted this year and include 
Warrick Dunn- All-Pro running 
back of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers 
and Atlanta Falcons and Deuce 
McAllister-New Orleans Saints 
Super Bow l champion. 

Past inductees into the Louisiana 
Hall of Fame includ four-time Super 
Bow l champion Terry Bradshaw, 
the late Coach Eddie Robinson of 
Grambling State, two-time NBA 
Champion Joe Dumars, the late 
"Pistol" Pete Marovich and All-Pro 
quarterback Archie Manning. 





Student Media Leaders Needed 

Annual positions open starting summer 2012 

• Argus Editor in Chief 

• Current Sauce Editor in Chief 

• Potpourri Editor in Chief 

• KNWD General Manager 

Applications available for Potpourri and 
Current Sauce in Kyser Hall, RM 225 
Argus 316G or 316N 
KNWD 316D 

Deadline to submit: March 28 
Scholarships Available 



For more information, contact: 
Argus: Dr. Julie Kane, kanej@nsula.edu 
Current Sauce: Dr. Paula Furr, furrp@nsula.edu 
Potpourri: Mrs. Stephanie Masson, massons@nsula.edu 
KNWD: Arther Dew, dewa@nsula.edu 






Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Trudy Armstead shoots a free throw. Armstead had 30 points in win over the UTA Lady Mavericks. 

Lady Demons zoom past UTA 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

With only three games 
remaining in the season, 
the Lady Demon basketball 
team managed to win its second 
Southland Conference game of 
the season with a victory over the 
University of Texas at Arlington. 

The Lady Demons (6-2 1, 2- 12) 
beat the Lady Mavericks by the 
score of 86-70 and snapped a nine- 
game losing streak. UTA fell to 
4-10 in Southland Conference play, 
eliminating them from post-season 
contention. 

Lady Demon basketball head 
coach Jennifer Graf admired the 
heart her team displayed 

"I told the girls that I'm more 
proud of them for the way they 
came out and played hard knowing 
we had no chance of going to the 
tournament," Lady Demon head 
coach Jennifer Graf said. "UTA 
was still playing for a spot and we 
knew they would come in and try to 



put it to us." 

NSU trailed UTA for the first 

1 minutes of the game, but they 
would eventually tie the game at 

1 1 -all before letting UTA go on a 
8-3 run. 

With 1 1 :25 left in the first half, 
the Lady Demons stomped on the 
throttle and began to take control of 
the game. 

NSU went on a 25-4 run that 
gave them a 29-23 lead. . 

The outside threat of Jordi 
James and the dominant inside 
presence of Trudy Armstead 
continued to fuel the charge, 
helping NSU build a 37-28 lead just 
before the half. 

Junior forward Trudy Armstead 
led the team with a career-high 
scoring night of 30 points. Armstead 
shot 11 of 19 from the floor, 
showcasing an arsenal of offensive 
go-to moves that allowed easy 
buckets on her defenders. She also 
grabbed 1 1 rebounds and had two 
steals. 



"Trudy has been that wildcard 
player all season," Graf said. "She 
gives it her all day in and day out, 
but there are some of those games 
where her scoring doesn't show 
up. It's almost like when she does 
score a lot, like today, it comes very 
quietly." 

She was followed by James with 
26 points and went five for seven 
from beyond the arc. 

"I thought Bob (assistant coach 
Bob Austin) did a really good 
job with this scout," Graf said. 
"We knew we were out of the 
tournament so he went in and told 
the girls to play their hearts out, that 
we have nothing to lose. I thought 
we played really well, especially 
on defense where we did a nice job 
of getting into passing lanes and 
creating some turnovers." 

Meredith Graf scored 10 points, 
hitting 50 percent from beyond the 
arc. 

The Lady Demons travel to 
Nicholls tonight with hopes to earn 
another Southland Conference win 



Last home game for Ellis, Mosley 




submitted photo 

Senior basketball players Louis Ellis and William Mosley will play in front of the home crowd 
for the last time, Wednesday night in Prather Coliseum. The two players have been top con- 
tributors to the success the team has had this season. Mosley, a premier defender, is ranked 
fifth on the NCAA shot block list. Ellis was the team's top scorer a year ago and has continued 
to provide good shooting for the Demons. The Demons will face Nicholls at 7 p.m. as the team 
tries to close out the regular season with wins. 



MAMA'S 30YZ www.mamasboyz.com JSRRy CRAFT 





u r rent 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, March 7, 2012 Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 19 



Campus organizations help out Hope for Paws 



Alexis Reliford 

Staff Reporter 

Wagging their tails and en- 
joying the breeze, a num- 
ber of dogs were spotted 
on the Kyser brickway using their 
obvious charm and bashful eyes to 
help the Student Activities Board 
and Phi Mu Fraternity collect items 
for a local organization. 

Hope for Paws is a non-profit ani- 
mal rescue organization dedicated to 
helping dogs, as well as other ani- 
mals find permanent, loving homes. 

Without an animal shelter in 
Natchitoches parish, there is a large 
amount of neglected dogs and cats in 
the community. 

The organization relies on do- 
nations and people who can serve as 
foster parents to the animals until a 
permanent home can be found. 

"SAB and Phi Mu chose 
Hope for Paws because they're an 
organization in our community who 
is in desperate need of assistance," 
Matt Spence, SAB's Service Learn- 



ing committee head, said. 

Last Friday, a donation table was 
set up near the end of the bricks 
where students were able to contrib- 
ute Pedigree dog food. Dawn dish 
detergent, collars and leashes of all 
sizes and dog shampoo. In addition 
to these items monetary donations 
were also accepted. 

The dogs that participated at the 
donation site belonged to members 
of both SAB and Phi Mu. 

One of the special animals in at- 
tendance was Hope for Paw's very 
own rescued canine named Flora. 

According to Spence, about $80 
was collected in addition to over two 
large trashcans of dog food, 10 large 
bottles of soap and shampoo and 
over 10 leashes and collars of differ- 
ent colors and sizes were all donated 
to Hope for Paws to help out animals 
like Flora. 

"It's important for organiza- 
tions at NSU, both Greek and other 
RSO's, to recognize a need for ser- 
vice in the community and act on it," 
Spence said. 




submitted photo 

The Student Activites Board and Phi Mu collected over $80 for Hope for Paws to help neglected animals. 




Songwriter Robet Sherman 
passes away: Robert Sherman 
passed away Tuesday at the age 
of 86. He wTote many classic 
scores for classic Disney films 
such as "Mary Poppins," "The 
Jungle Book" and "The Aris- 
tocats." He also wrote "It's a 
Small World After AH." He was 
awarded two Academy Awards, 
a Grammy and a star on the Hoi 
lywood Walk of Fame. 

FBI arrests three members 
from LulzSec: The FBI has ar- 
rested three members of the un- 
derground hacker group LulzSec 
Charges are to be made public 
against two other members. 



Aquaculture 

Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State Univer- 
sity's Aquaculture Research 
Center is selling live craw- 
fish harvested from the Cen- 
ter's crawfish ponds in Lena every 
week though late May. Crawfish are 
delivered from the Center to North- 
western State's main campus on Fri- 
days at 10 a.m. and are available for 
pickup in the parking lot of St. Denis 
Hall. The price per pound is estab- 
lished every Monday. This week's 
price per pound is S3. 30. 

"We are particularly proud of 
our crawfish because they are the 
successful result of our research on 
increasing production in crawfish 
ponds," Dr. Julie Delabbio, Director 
of the Aquaculture Research Center, 
said. 

"We get a much higher production 



center sells live crawfish 

■i 




out of our ponds than most regional 
crawfish farmers. All the crawfish 
we sell are select size. The small 
crawfish are removed prior to sell- 
ing. The money we get from these 
live crawfish sales is reinvested in 
our research activities at the Center." 

Delabbio said she can take orders 
as small as five pounds. 

"The crawfish are in sacks so we 



recommend those who purchase to 
bring a cooler for transport, particu- 
larly on warm days," Delabbio said. 
"Calling early in the week is impor- 
tant because we are usually sold out 
by Thursday afternoons." 

For more information or to place 
an order, call Delabbio at (318) 663- 
0382 or e-mail delabbioj@nsula. 
edu. 



Tara Luck to represent NSU in D.C. 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

Student Government Asso- 
ciation President 
Tara Luck will 
be in Washing- 
ton, D.C. March 5-8 to 
meet with members of 
the state's congressio- 
nal delegation. Along 
with other SGA presi- 
dents, she will have the 
opportunity to discuss 
federal funding for 
higher education. She 
feels that this is impor- 
tant for Northwestern 
and its students as it 
"puts NSU on a national level." 
As a member of the Council of 



■■HHHI 



Student Body Presidents and chair 
of the Legislative and Academic Af- 
fairs Committee, Luck serves as an 
advocate for students on issues that 
could affect policies on higher edu- 
cation. 

COSBP is a 
statewide organiza- 
tion of Louisiana 
public college and 
university Student 
Government Asso- 
ciation and Student 
Bar Association 
presidents. 

Chartered by the 
Board of Regents, 
which coordinates 
all public higher ed- 
ucation in Louisiana, COSBP helps 
ensure that Louisiana's colleges and 
universities remain responsive to 




the students' needs and that their 
academic and career success is 
optimized. 

The invitation to attend the 
event in the nation's capitol came 
courtesy of Louisiana Senator 
Mary Landrieu. This experience 
will afford students an up-close 
look at the political process on 
the national level. 

While at the event Luck will 
attend Dr. Jim Purcell's Presen- 
tation on Higher Education and 
meet with our state's representa- 
tives in small groups. 

In an interview with The 
Natchitoches Times, Luck stated 
that she "wanted to convince 
[our representatives] that higher 
education is an important invest- 
ment." 



Psychology department attends SEPA conference in New Orleans 

Couresy of News Bureau SEPA is a regional psychological 

association affiliated with the Amer- 
ican Psychological Association. The 
purpose of SEPA is to advance psy- 
chology as a science, as a profession, 
and as a means of promoting human 
welfare. SEPA's mission is to stimu- 
late the exchange of scientific and 
professional ideas across the diverse 
areas of psychological inquiry and 
application. 

The professional members of 
SEPA hold positions in settings such 
as universities, colleges, business 
and industry, hospitals and clinics, 
government and private practice. 

In these and other settings, the 
psychologists of SEPA teach, con- 
duct research, engage in psychologi- 
cal assessment and therapy, serve as 
administrators and consultants and 
publish scholarly works on all as- 
pects of the human experience. 

Student members of SEPA, from 
psychology undergraduate and grad- 
uate programs throughout the south- 
east and beyond, reflect the varied 
interests of their mentors in the be- 
havioral sciences, from the functions 
of the brain to the actions of nations. 



Faculty and students from 
Northwestern State Univer- 
sity's Department of Psy- 
chology represented the university 
at the Southeastern Psychological 
Association (SEPA) annual meeting 
in New Orleans. 

"Our department sent a full contin- 
gency to the conference and despite 
the hoopla of Mardi Gras crowds 
and traffic, all sessions were well 
attended and our participants had a 
positive professional experience," 
said Dr. Susan Thorson-Barnett, 
chair of the Department of Psychol- 
ogy and associate professor. 

Dr. Thorson-Barnett, Joseph 
D. Biscoe III, associate professor, 
and graduate assistant Laura Burns 
conducted a three-hour continuing 
education workshop entitled "MI- 
CROSKILLS: I'm Hearing What 
Your Are Saying, But What Are You 
Saying?" 

Barnett, Professor Emeritus Mau- 
reen McHale and Terry Isbell, in- 
structor, presented a history of the 
Department as part of a session that 
examined the development of psy- 





Photo submitted by news Bureau 

Photographed above are faculty and students that presented at the Southeastern Psychological Association's annual meeting in New Orleans. 



chology programs throughout the 
southeast. 

Dr. Cynthia Lindsey, associate 
professor, and Michelle Robichaux 
Barnhill, M.S., presented a paper 
titled "Integrative Model of Motiva- 



tion and Commitment: Personality 
and Social Foci." Dr. Lindsey also 
presented with Laura Miller, M.S., 
a poster titled "Effect of Approval 
Seeking on Anxiety and Separation 
Individuation in College." 



Graduate student Kayla LeLeux- 
LaBarge and Dr. Margaret Cochran 
presented a paper entitled ■"Influence 
of Parenting Styles and Maladaptive 
Cognitive Schemas on Anxiety." 
Graduate student Brandon La- 



Barge, along with thesis committee 
members Cochran and Thorson-Bar- 
nett. presented a poster titled "Hu- 
mor Styles and Life-Style Defense 
Mechanisms in Psychological Well- 
Being." 



Index 1 




Thursday 












Wednesday 


Friday 


Saturday 


Sunday 


Monday 


Tuesday 




2 Life 


80765° 


83763° 


78754° 


70759° 


75755° 


73759° 


74757° 


3 Opinions 
















4 Sports 

















Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
March 7, 2012 



The cinnamon challenge: A breathless experience 



Alyssa Richardson 

Sauce Reporter 

Cinnamon may be a tasty treat 
that tickles your taste buds, 
but a new trend called the 
"'cinnamon challenge" is much more 
than a tickle. It's dangerous. 

Those who have tried this 
cinnamon trend all have the same 
end results, a struggle for air. 
Cinnamon is a spice not made 
to be eaten in a lump form but 
as ingredient in food. Though 
no severe consequences, such 
as death or sickness, have been 
recorded people who have tried the 
challenge describe the experience as 
unbearable. 

The challenge is this: swallow a 
lump of cinnamon without choking, 
coughing or drinking anything. 



The spice will dry your mouth 
making it almost impossible to 
swallow without coughing. If you 
mistakenly inhale the cinnamon 
before you put the spoon in your 
mouth, you will not likely be able to 
swallow it. 

"I drank anything I could 
find, even milk, but nothing was 
working," junior CIS major Ameir 
Stewart said. "This may sound 
extreme but I thought I was going 
to die, I couldn't breathe. I coughed 
for more than an hour before I 
actually calmed myself down." 

"Cinnamon Challenges" 
posted on YouTube show people 
from around the world who have 
attempted this dare. Some of the 
videos are disturbing because of 
the severity of the coughing and 
gagging. 



"I hav e read about a lot of 
horrible 'trends' that people 
come up with but this one is 
so scary because there are so 
many outcomes," senior pre- 
med major Britney Monroe said. 
"The cinnamon can get stuck in 
your throat preventing you from 
breathing, and you could die before 
you get a chance to drink anything. 
No deadly reports have been 
recorded but at the rate the trend is 
going I won't be shocked to hear 
such tragic news. I would like to 
stress to students the danger in this 
so-called 'game' because you're 
gambling your life." 

According to a recent article 
posted on cbslocal.com, doctors and 
nurses urge people not to try this 
challenge because it can raise blood 
sugar levels, burn the throat and get 



into the lungs. 

"I attempted the challenge a few 
years ago but I still remember all 
the cups of water my friends had to 
bring me," senior psychology major 
Ambemette Campers said as she 
chuckled to herself. 

"I'm laughing because I knew 
it was a bad idea and I still did it. I 
inhaled the cinnamon before I put 
the spoon in, and I choked on the 
cinnamon dust. I was devastated." 

For more information about 
the dangers of the "cinnamon 
challenge" visit wwAv.usatoday.com/ 
video/is-the-cinnamon-challenge- 
dangerous. 

There are also hundreds of 
videos circulating the web of 
those who hav e dared to take the 
challenge. 




Photo illustrations by Alyssa Richardson 



Students jazz it up with musician Mike Vax 



J.C Bryant 

Sauce Reporter 

High school bands and combos 
embraced the musical atmo- 
sphere on NSU's campus last 
Saturday for the annual Jazz Festi- 
val. 

This event not only helps create 
new great jazz musicians, but also 
gives them a sneak peak of NSU's 
thriving jazz program and ambitious 
professors. 

The festival was spearheaded by 
the jazz directors who brought in 
clinician, critically-acclaimed trum- 
peter and bandleader Mike Vax. Vax 
served as one of the judges who cri- 
tiqued each of the bands and after 
performances, held a clinic specific 
to each of the bands' needs. 

In one of the sessions, Vax stressed 
the importance of jazz history. 

"How can you know why some 
artists are doing what they're doing 
today if you have no idea where that 
came from or how they were doing 
things before," Vax said. 

Vax explained that jazz music 
had to be a lifestyle - not a hobby or 
something you pull out of the closet 
on the weekends when you want to 
have fun. 

"To be a good jazz musician, you 
have to be immersed in it. You have 
to live and breathe jazz music. Lis- 
ten to as many artists as possible — 
the classics - get ideas from them 
and try to play like them," Vax said. 

He then went around the room 
and asked who some of the band 
members' favorite musicians were. 

Vax also shared stories from his 
youth and helped the students to ap- 
preciate the amenities they have to- 
day. 

"We didn't have YouTube when 




Submitted photo 

A NSU student plays his saxophone for Mike Vax at the Jazz Festival. 



I was learning jazz. If you wanted to 
hear jazz, you went out to a gig and 
you watched closely or you bought a 
record and played along to it. There 
were no books — no sheet music — 
no nothing," 

He added, "There were just all 
these standards that you had to know 
if you wanted to get a gig. And when 
I graduated high school, I knew more 
than 200 charts by memory. But you 
guys really don't know how great 
you have it. You can do a search on 
YouTube and you can watch dead 
guys playing music! You guys really 
ought to be taking advantage of that. 
Spend some time on YouTube ev ery 
day watching some of the jazz greats 
and team from them." 



It was obvious that all the stu- 
dents took a lot from the knowledge 
Vax shared. Even though his prima- 
ry instrument is trumpet, he seems 
to be just as a strong a bandleader. 
He offered insight to every mem- 
ber of each ensemble and showed a 
good grasp of the fact that musicians 
should work together and stressed 
this to the members. 

As a composer, one of his pieces 
"Naked Gun," was chosen as the 
theme song for the Naked Gun films. 
As a recording musician, he has per- 
formed on more than 75 albums, in- 
cluding 20 under his own name. Vax 
hopes to continue sharing the things 
he has learned in more clinics na- 
tionwide. 



Up 'til dawn 2012: Circus of Hope 

p til Dawn 

Unite to Fight Childhood Cancer 



St* Tudc Childrcns 
Research Hospital 

ALSAC • D«eof Tfcow»», Fonudtr 



Memrie Gibbons 

Sauce Reporter 

Tuesday, March 13, the Northwestern State University chapter of Up 'til Dawn will be holding a 'Circus 
of Hope' to raise money for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. 
The event will consist primarily of teams formed by various groups and organizations on campus writing 
letters in order to gather donations for St. Jude. 

This will be NSU's third time hosting the letter-writing event, and over 500 students are already registered 
for the event. 

Up 'til Dawn is a student-led organization on campuses throughout the United States. Up 'til Dawn, just like 
St. Jude, is an organization dependent on donations in order to run smoothly. Local businesses offer their services 
every year to provide things like food and incentives in order to ensure that Up 'til Dawn is a success. 

Come out to be a part of a wonderful campaign and a great cause! 



The college formal: Not your high school prom 




Jacob 
Labutka 

Fashion 
Columnist 



Your date cancelled at the 
last minute so you enter the 
ballroom for your senior 
prom in your finely laced strapless 
dress with a pair of heels to match, 
and you are accompanied by several 
of your girlfriends (one of whom 
spilled red sauce on their dress at 
dinner). 

Prom was the time in high 
school to look pretty; formals are 
the time in college to stand out and 
look breathtaking. 

TO! ¥ NEEDLES 

1 Tattoo Studio, LLC 



Though most formals are not 
until April, it's never too early 
(to an extent) to think about what 
you're wearing. It may not be a 
fairy tale ball, but at least it's not 
high school. 

Before we even think about what 
you're wearing, we must identify 
the best way to prepare for this 
event: having a girl's day! 

For those who have money to 
blow, a salon-sty led cut and a mani- 
pedi are the perfect constituents for 
any morning makeover. 

However, many of us need a 
more wallet-friendly way to spend 
time with the girls. It's nice to get 
your nails done in a salon, but a 
group of friends doing nails at home 
could prove to be more entertaining 



than being out on the town. 

While preparing for a social 
event one goal should be to look 
and feel radiant, and nothing will 
pave the way to radiance better 
than a good exfoliant. You can buy 
a one-time use avocado or mint 
mask from Wal-mart for about a 
dollar, or buy a container of an 
exfoliating mask and use it several 
times for only a few dollars to start 
a regimen. 

Now it's time to discuss the most 
important part of your preparations: 
picking your outfit. It baffles me 
how at many formal events there 
is an extreme lack of vibrancy and 
variability of outfits (especially 
regarding men's suits). 

Howev er, the lack of distinctions 



among some men's suits seems to 
be perpetuated by what's available 
in stores: for women there are 
dresses of all colors and styles and 
for men there are largely only black 
suits and baggy dress shirts. 

I have attempted to jump this 
hurdle by finding stores with dress 
shirts that have a good fit and a 
variety of colors. No matter your 
gender, find a formal style that 
reflects your personality but allows 
you to stand out (this is the moment 
where I look at the men and cough 
and say "Express"). 

The formal is an equal 
opportunity to be glamorous 
without there being a contest. 

Everyone has a chance at the 
spotlight. 



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Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
March 7, 2012 



Rants: Midterm hump 
and downward slump 




Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



By now I hope that all of 
you are done with midterm 
exams and so forth. This 
week will begin the final slump 
toward summertime. 

In all my years as a student, I 
have observ ed how many others 
"tune in, turn on and drop out" in 
regards to their studies during the 
final stretch of the spring semester. 

I am also guilty of this thing I have 
dubbed "summer-itis." 

In this week's column it is my 
brave goal to give you tips and 
tricks to keep you sane and less 
stressed, or maybe the better word 
is bored) in the final weeks of 
school. All of my tips are by no 
means secret, but they all stem from 
one principle: divide and conquer. 

Splitting up the load and 
fracturing your academic 
obligations is the sure way to allow 
for more free time or at least more 
control of your time. 

Trick number one is to take a 
few A-term classes. Notice I say 
only A-term here. Even though you 
might take 18 hours this semester, 
you could be taking 15, 1 2 or even 
nine hours by the end of February. 

With A-term classes, you can 
cut your workload by half and have 
another half term to take up a class 
at the WRAC or add a few more 
hours to y our workweek. You could 
even do nothing at all. 



Neat, huh? 

Trick number two is to take 
two on-line classes. For me, two is 
perfect because any less and you 
may forget to "attend*' class. If you 
have more than two classes you 
may feel as if you could put them 
off, as they are lacking a concrete 
schedule. 

The on-line classes (which I 
have already commented on earlier 
this semester) free you up to enjoy 
or relax at your own discretion. You 
could take French at three in the 
morning if you so cared. 

The third and final trick is to 
take three to six hours less than you 
did in the fall (unless that number 
happens to be 12 or something 
along those lines). During the fall, 
I notice more students with a "can 
do" mentality that slowly rots into 
"ho-hum" by March. 

Fewer hours in the spring also 
allow you to work more for gainful 
employment and earn extra cash for 
much anticipated summer plans. 

Also, tuition, fees and books are 
usually cheaper in the spring. Fewer 
hours in the spring means cheaper 
semester all around. (Note: this is 
just my observation of my past eight 
semesters). 

With these tricks and tips in 
mind, 1 hope that your next spring 
(and possibly even summer) 
semesters are more enjoyable and 
require less hair-pulling, stress and 
overall depression. 

While none of this knowledge is 
revolutionary or far-fetched, I hope 
it helps you succeed in whatever 
degree program and whatever year 
you are in here at NSU. 



The 

CurrentSauce 



Jirnmie Wajker 
Tiaitor-in-Chiej 



Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 



Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 




Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@email.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



Upcycling your style 




We need writers! 

Our newspaper needs stories written by 
students! 

Come by our office, 227 Kyser, if you would 
like to join. 

Meetings every Monday at 6 p.m. We hope to 
hear from you! 

- Current Sauce staff 



Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
editor 



The life of college students 
has always been depicted 
through stereotypes. From 
pulling all-nighters to living in 
barren spaces not fit for a dorm 
room, it seems as though a lot of 
this information on students could 
be incorrect. 

Sadly , a lot of these stereotypes 
are founded in truth to some extent. 
Money is tight for most students, 
and their money problems can't be 
eliminated with minimum wages 
from a part-time job. 

Many students end up in a room 
filled with mismatched furniture on 
cracked linoleum flooring. One way 
to bypass this is by incorporating 
some upcycled decoration into your 
room. Upcycling involves buying or 
using something for a new purpose. 

Some of these projects are time- 
consuming and difficult (e.g. a chair 
made of cardboard and glue), but 
some of them are perfect for college 
students (e.g. a bath mat made of 



old t-shirts). Instructions on making 
something like the t-shirt rug can be 
found below this article. 

Now it's possible for any one 
of us to have something beautiful 
and completely customizable in 
our home, and this extends to 
furniture as well. It's possible, even 
surprisingly easy, to recover pieces 
of furniture. This preserves an 
elegant or pleasing shape, but adds 
the benefit of a cute pattern or color 
that matches your room. 

Upcycled projects can be done 
on a low budget and don't require 
any changes to a room, since most 
college students are renters. 

If you're low on money, you can 
consider joining some Facebook 
groups such as "Natchitoches Swap 
Shop" or "Craft & Trade." These 
groups concentrate on selling and 
buying items for low prices, but 
you also have the option of trading 
your unwanted items (or your craft 
items!) for something you need. 

Keep these tips in mind next 
time you take a look around your 
apartment. Just because you're a 
college student doesn't mean you 
have to live in a bland box. Spice it 
up with some customizable projects, 
and add a little touch of yourself to 
your space. 



Instructions for a handmade bath towel 

You will need: gridded matting (available at craft stores) and 
3-4 towels 

1 . Wash and dry all of the old bath towels 1 "hi wf" ■ far *hl« 
project. 

2. Decide how big you want the rug. (TIP: Measure from 
shower recess.) 

3. Cut towels into 6" long pieces, approximately 3/4" thick. 

4. Knot each strip along the grid, making sure they are facing 
the right way. 



ACROSS 

1 Bar bill 
4 Perspire 
9 Use a 
crowbar 

12 Knight's 
address 

13 Actress 
Berry 

14 Fish eggs 

15 Alternative 
to a jail 
term 

17 Eggs 

18 Rhyming 
tribute 

19 Vacuum 
brand 

21 SaM 

companion 

24 Opposed to 

25 *~ Town* 

26 Congeal 
28 Cord fiber 
31 Cattte dnve 

tool 
33 Pooch 
36 Location 
36 Couches 
38 Sphere 

40 End lor ball 
or bass 

41 Wester, 
state 

43 Basketball's 

Mr Mourning 
45 PBS "Street" 

47 Extinct b»d 

48 Spoon- 
bender 

49 Raise 

accompani- 



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GP 







merit often 

54 Id counter 
part 

55 Bounded 

along 

56 That c/ri 

57 Boxing 
promoter 
King 

58 Contest 
submission 

59 Cut the 
grass 

DOWN 

Recipe 
rreas. 

Atmosphere 
Kinsman, tor 
short 

Sunglasses 



9 

to 

11 
16 
20 

21 
22 



Irrigated 
Inventor 
Whitney 
Hawaiian 
greeting 
Mortises 
mates 
Conditional 
stipulation 
Wander 
365 days 
Jazz styse 
Elevator 
name 
Bursts 
Modern-day 
money 
Lavish 
supply 
Also 

The gamut 



30 Letterman 

rival 
32 Information 
34 "Frasier" star 

Keteey 
3? Taste 
39 Sanguinary 
42 Egret's 

cousin 

44 Cheehos 
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45 Too* to 
court 

46 Therefore 

50 Choose 

51 Doctrine 

52 Discoverer's 
caf 

53 Fresh 





StranSB 

BUT TRUE 

By Smaaalfaa Weaver 

* It was American author James 
TtaWwbo made the following sage 
dbstivaUm: "Humor is emotional 
dans remembered in traoqudmy. 9 

* If you're a fen of the original 
"Wizard of Oz" movie, joa might be 
staprised to team that the actress who 
played Gftoda the Good Witch, Bfl- 
ae Buike. was 54 yeses old -when the 
film was shot 

- He sward far the most needless 
war m history could very well go ro 
Paraguay, whose president. Francisco 
SttooLx^beJfeedhinEelftobe 
hi excellent tactician He was i gnat 
admirer of Napc&on Bonaparte and 
wished to emulate the Preach emper- 
or, bat he had oo wars to fight To 
remedy the sanation, in 1864 Lopez 
declared war on all three of his neigh- 
boring countries, Uruguay. Argentina 
and tad. lis T2 mm sbtlroes seem 
to have been of hitletKe, howeves. it 
k estimated that 90 percent of Para- 
guay's male population was MUed 
during the course of the war 

* During this time of election mad- 
ness, 'misology could be a useful 
word to know, it means hatred of 



- French novefot Marcel Proust's 
uiagMBH opus, "Remembrance of 
Things Past," has bees hailed as a 
hterary masterpiece, but not every- 
one was a tan at first read As Proust 
was trying, mwrrwfafly, to find a 
ptahiEmerfkvaosset^en-'taahm 
one publisher said, 1 may be dense, 
but I fan to see why a chap needs 30 
pages to describe how he tosses and 
lams in bed before tailing asleep 
The author finally published the first 
volume with his own money; 
the booh was haded as a i 
by critics, the same publishers who 
had rejected Proust competed fur the 
oppartumty to prin* rhe other sis vdI- 
■■H ozim wbA 



mUk.jak i nft -^iwPi 



L J 

The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 

.. . ■ - . . 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 

March 7, 2012 



Demons poised for SLC Tourney run 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

Northwestern State's track re- 
cord of Southland Confer- 
ence Tournament success, 
and the spectacular albeit 
sporadic performances by this year's 
Demons, gives 13th-year NSU 
coach Mike McConathy plenty of 
optimism as his team takes on Lamar 
Wednesday at 2:30 in a tournament 
quarterfinal matchup at the Merrell 
Center. 

The Demons ( 1 6- 1 5 ) and the Car- 
dinals (20-11) split regular season 
games, NSU winning 74-62 at home 
and Lamar rolling 85-66 in Beau- 
mont. McConathy has guided six 
teams to the Southland Tournament 
finals, winning in 2001 and 2006, 
with NSU 14-6 in conference tour- 
nament games in his tenure. 

"Depth has always been a big plus 
for our team. Over a four-day tour- 
nament, depth helps keep legs fresh. 
We play a lot of players all season 
long to be in the best position to have 
everybody able to contribute, espe- 
cially now. We are built for tourna- 
ment play," said McConathy. "It's a 
three-game season, and if you keep 
winning, it starts another season, the 
NCAA Tournament, next week. The 
guys have to believe in the system, 
believe in each other, and it's been 
proven successful if the team rises to 
the occasion." 

Northwestern opened league 
play 7-2, but lost six of its last eight 
games overall, going 1-6 in confer- 
ence games, while Lamar has won 
its last three following a skid of three 
losses in four outings. 

"At times we've played as well 




Demons will play in the quarterfinal 

as any team I've coached at North- 
western," said McConathy. "We had 
a 27-point lead late on Arkansas- 
Little Rock, who won their division 
in the Sun Belt. We had a 22-point 
lead on a 17-win Campbell team that 
beat Iowa by 16, and we held Camp- 
bell, who was No. 2 in the country 
in field goal percentage, to its worst 
shooting of the season. We were up 
42 late last week against a Nicholls 
team that had won five of its last six. 
If we can get on one of those rolls, it 



game against Lamar at 2:30 p.m. The 

could be a pretty special run." 

The Demons are the No. 6 seed, 
while the Cardinals are perched at 
No. 3 behind Texas-Arlington and 
Stephen F. Austin. SFA plays No. 
7 Sam Houston State in another 
Wednesday quarterfinal, with the 
winner there matching up against 
the NSU-Lamar survivor in a 6:05 
Thursday semifinal. 

"We've won as a lower seed. 
We've been beaten by a lower seed 
last year that went on to win the tour- 



last game between the two resulted 

nament. The seed doesn't matter, it's 
about the matchups, and we're hope- 
ful the Lamar matchup is a good 
matchup," said McConathy. "Every- 
body is 0-0 now and nothing up to 
this means anything. The best team 
this week will win." 

Lamar has three All-Southland 
Conference standouts, guards Mike 
James (16.8 scoring average), An- 
thony Miles (14.6) and Devon Lamb 
(12 points, 8.3 rebounds, second 
in the SLC behind NSU's William 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
in a 19-point NSU loss. 

Mosley). 

"They're dangerous because they 
have great players, guys who can 
really score the basketball, and we 
have to keep them in check. We can 
also score the basketball, and when 
we do, we're pretty good," said Mc- 
Conathy. 

"They've played very well re- 
cently and overall they've had a very 
fine season." 

Said third-team All-SLC selection 



Shamir Davis, a junior point guard 
leading NSU with a 13.4 scoring av- 
erage: 

"Lamar has great guard play, 
some good rebounders inside. Lamb 
is outstanding there. Obviously 
we've got to do a better job rebound- 
ing and we'll knock down our share 
of shots." 

Mosley rejoined the team for a 
walk-through Monday night, and 
travelled with the Demons Tuesday 
morning to Katy following a team 
practice. The senior center suffered 
the sudden passing of his nearly- 
year-old twin boys Saturday night. 

"Obviously he's hurting," said 
Davis, also a high school teammate 
of Mosley's at Shreveport-Hunting- 
ton. "We've never seen or heard of 
anything like it, and we're trying our 
best to handle it and to support him. 
We know this is his last year and he 
really wants that ring. If we didn't 
have reason before, we really have 
one now." 

Mosley is NSU's second-leading 
scorer with an 1 1 .3 average, 1 8.5 per 
game in the last two games. He tops 
the Southland with his 9.6 rebound- 
ing average and is second nationally 
with 4.1 blocked shots per game. 

The game will be broadcast on the 
Demon Sports Network, flagshipped 
by 100.7 KZBL FM in Natchi- 
toches and including 99.9 KTEZ 
FM in Many and 92.1 KSYR FM in 
Shreveport. 

The audio will be streamed on 
nsudemons.com with free streaming 
v ideo on SLC Now at the southland, 
org website. Twitter updates will be 
provided at the @NSUDemonsMBB 
account. 



Selected faculty can 'guest coach' athletic teams at NSU 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Sauce Reporter 

Attention faculty: If you've 
ever been an armchair 
quarterback, now is your 
chance to "guest coach" an 
NSU athletic team this spring. The 
only requirement is to be selected 
by the student-athletes who attend 
your classes. 

This new initiative is part of 
the Student-Athlete Advisory 
Committee at NSU (SAAG). 
Originally started by the NCAA in 
1 989, the organization promotes 
a student-athlete voice within the 
NCAA structure and a positive 
student-athlete image. 

As guest coaches, faculty 
members would attend practices, 
games and team-meetings to better 
understand the team. Spending a 
day around athletes would allow 
professors a better perspective of 
the student-athlete life. 



"I thought it was good to get 
the professors involved because 
sometimes they don't understand 
all the hard work that we do," Nic 
Russo, NSU football player and 
senior mass communications major, 
said. "It was good for them to see us 
at practice and during games." 

The pilot for guest coaching 
began two years ago with football 
and the men's and women's 
basketball teams. As of the fall 
201 1 , all sports have an opportunity 
to participate in the program. 

One of the faculty members who 
participated with football last fall 
was science instructor Roxanne 
Lane. 

"I did have a good time," Lane 
said. "I was very impressed w ith 
the way it was organized. I went 
to the football practice where I 
got to meet the team, and I really 
enjoyed that part. I did learn more 
about w hat they go through. I have 
more appreciation for the athletic 



department now for how busy they 
are and how hard they try to make 
NSU sports more professional." 

During the year, SAAC serves as 
a forum for student-athlete welfare. 
Fach team selects two student 
representatives who attend biweekly 
meetings. SAAC set three main 
goals for 2012: unity across sports, 
unity across campus and more 
involvement from Natchitoches in 
NSU athletics. 

Carrie Crowell, Head Academic 
Coordinator for athletes, supports 
the goals of SAAC. 

"One of the biggest things about 
SAAC that is important is that it 
gives a student-athlete a voice," 
Crowell said. "It puts them in 
charge of things other than athletic 
administrators. 

It is all about student-athlete's 
experience. SAAC allows them to 
be in control and teaches them how 
to become leaders." 




Submitted photo 

Soccer "guest coaches" Susan Dollar and Jim Cruise cheer on players in pre-game line in the fall 2011. 



Student Media Leaders Needed 

Annual positions open starting summer 2012 

• Argus Editor in Chief 

• Current Sauce Editor in Chief 

• Potpourri Editor in Chief 

• KNWD General Manager 



Applications available for Potpourri and 
Current Sauce in Kyser Hall, RM 225 
Argus 316G or 316N 
KNWD 316D 



Deadline to submit: March 28 
Scholarships Available 

For more information, contact: 
Argus: Dr. Julie Kane, kanej@nsula.edu 
Current Sauce: Dr. Paula Furr, furrp@nsula.edu 
Potpourri: Mrs. Stephanie Masson, massons@nsula.edu 
KNWD: Arther Dew, dewa@nsula.edu 



Must come see today. 



Limited spaces available! 



~k PrQ-loasing 

NOW for Fall 2012 

100 North Melrose Ave. - Next door to Wal-Mart 
(318) 352-5776 • www.indiansummerapts.com 



A P A F 



t/ilfia/i t fit/hmer- 



APARTMENT COMMUNITY 



i 



u rrent 




3l u ce 

Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, March 14, 2012 ♦Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 20 



SGA candidates vie for top spot 



Ty Johnson 

Practicum Student 

Three SGA members along 
with their respective running 
mates filed an Intent-to-Run 
form for SGA presidency and vice 
presidency. 

In past years, only one prospect 
filed to run for SGA president 
without an opponent. This year 
has proven to be different. Derrick 
Houston, Ellie Spain and Richard 
Spark are presidential candidates for 
the 2012-2013 SGA Election. 

"Communication, commitment 
and change" is presidential 
candidate Derrick Houston's 
platform. Houston is a junior social 
work major. 

"I want to increase 
communication between SGA, 
administration and students," 
Houston said. "I hope more students 
will be committed to getting 
involved and voicing their opinions 
on what changes they want to see." 
Houston's involvement in other 
recognized student organizations 
such as the African American 
Caucus, Helping Hands and Alpha 
Phi Alpha Fraternity keeps him in 



direct contact with students and 
their concerns. 

"I am member of Alpha Phi 
Alpha, Incorporated," Houston said. 
'"Just interacting with students about 
what kind of events they want to 
see from us on campus allows me 
to be able to listen to their opinions 
and consider those perspectives. 
This also branches out to the other 
organizations that I am involved 
in." 

Houston, also a freshman 
connector, said he plans to continue 
to take advantage of his regular 
interaction with students by 
promoting SGA awareness. 
With the help of running mate 
junior criminal justice major Raven 
Maxile, he believes as a team they 
will embody what they've chosen 
as their campaign slogan — "A Voice 
You Can Believe In." 

"I'm only one voice ,but I feel 
like I am a very active voice on 
campus," Houston said. "Working 
with Raven, we can motivate 
senators in SGA to be more 
proactive in getting out there with 
students so we can see what can be 
done." 

Maxile believes good 



communication between her and 
Houston will not only make for a 
successful campaign, but if elected, 
will be critical among them and the 
SGA community. 
"It's important that we're on 
the same page," Maxile said. 
"Normally, we are." 

"Our biggest priority is putting 
students first," Houston said. 
SGA presidential candidate Ellie 
Spain has a similar vision. Spain is 
a senior liberal arts major with an 
emphasis in international relations. 

"My focus is the students," Spain 
said. "I don't know that you'll meet 
someone who will have a greater 
passion for serving than I do." 
Spain has served in SGA since 
last fall. Since then, she's realized 
her love of public service and 
interaction with students. Most of 
all, she's realized how she can make 
a difference. 

She would like to make changes 
within the student government 
and get feedback about proposed 
bills. In order to get that feedback, 
she plans to use office hours as 
an opportunity to visit student 
hangouts. 

"I'm going to lead by example," 



Spain said. "Whenever I throw 
myself into something, I am in it to 
win it. There is nothing that I won't 
give for the organization." 

Senior biology major and 
running mate Megan McDaniel 
shares the same dedication to SGA. 

"I've been a commissioner for 
two years, and I feel like joining 
the executive board is the next 
step," McDaniel said. "I believe I 
can have more of an impact as vice 
president." 

Besides joining Spain in 
involving more students in SGA 
decision-making, McDaniel 
supports Spain's platform in 
focusing on not making insincere 
promises, but improving upon what 
is already present. 

"Ellie and I want to improve 
some of the old conditions and 
consider new changes," McDaniel 
said. "We may be able to revisions 
to what we have now instead 
of doing something completely 
different." 

Spain encourages students to 
make informed decisions before 
placing a vote. Informed decision- 
making falls in directly in line with 
her campaign slogan — "Putting the 



U back in NSU." 

"I want to make sure that 
students know this election is their 
voice, and they need to vote for 
someone who represents their voice, 
"Spain said. "Whoever you're 
voting for will be there for a year so 
make sure their ideas line up with 
yours." 

SGA presidential candidate and 
senior accounting major Richard 
Sharp encourages students to do the 
same. 

"One of my concerns is students 
who view the election as a friend 
contest," Sharp said. "It's important 
that students consider the things 
a candidate can bring to the table 
instead of the person that they're 
most familiar with." 

Sharp and running mate Emily 
Cogburn built their platform on 
creating unity on campus which 
in turn, they hope, will create one 
voice that can help change things 
for the better. 

Among the changes Sharp 
and Cogburn are considering are 
reassessing student fee placement 
and student union renovations. 

"When I decided to run for the 



presidency, I knew I wanted to 
make a lasting change," Sharp said. 
"It's OK if all of the changes don't 
happen right now. It would be nice 
to come back 10 years from now 
and see the changes we started." 
Another issue on his agenda is 
increasing RSO support. 

Sharp said he would like 
someone representing SGA to 
attend activities such as basketball 
games, football games and RSO 
events to take advantage of the 
chance to interact with students and 
get feedback. 

"Students have the power to 
empower other students," Sharp 
said. "We can empower students 
by informing them about some of 
things the administration does and 
bringing up current issues. I feel 
like they would be more concerned 
if they had more information. After 
they've been informed they have 
the power to do something about 
it." 

Although the candidates 
have different methods of being 
productive leaders, they share a 
common desire to increase their 
public service to the student body. 



NSU Purple Jackets seek new members 

"on tessa Wills cians or aistiniuiished alumni visit zation is "an elite croup on campus mmm jb . 



Contessa Wills 

Sauce Reporter 

The Purple Jackets Honor Soci- 
ety is seeking new members. 
The deadline to submit appli- 
cations is April 30 by noon in Room 
309 of the Student Union to Francis 
Conine. 

One of the oldest and most pres- 
tigious organizations on campus, the 
Purple Jackets serve as the official 
hosts of Northwestern State Univer- 
sity. Its purpose is to develop strong 
character, high ideals and construc- 
tive purpose in its members by coop- 
erative service in organizations. 

The ladies of the Purple Jackets 
host guests at the President's House, 
accommodate alumni at home sport- 
ing events and help with commence- 
ment ceremonies. Whenever politi- 



cians or distinguished alumni visit 
the university, the members of the 
Purple Jackets Honor Society repre- 
sent NSU. 

This organization differs from 
others because prospective mem- 
bers must be female, classified as 
either a junior or senior, have a 3.0 
GPA, member of at least two RSOs 
and hold a leadership position in at 
least one organization to be eligible 
to join. 

President, Chelsea Zeno said, "At 
first I was discouraged by having 
to wait, but it served as motivation 
for me to keep my GPA up so that I 
could join in my junior year." 

Zeno said that the Purple Jackets 
was the first organization that caught 
her eye when she started attending 
NSU. Zeno added that another rea- 
son she joined was that the organi- 



zation is "an elite group on campus 
that promotes women." 

Vice President Arielle Craige 
has been a member for one year and 
has enjoyed getting to know Dr. and 
Mrs. Webb, Dr. Abney and serving 
the university. Craige said that be- 
ing a member comes with some ben- 
efits. While performing their duties 
at either the President's House or in 
the President's Box at games, mem- 
bers are able to network with alumni 
which could lead to internships or 
job opportunities. 

"You never know who is going to 
come through," Craige said. 

Additionally, members receive 
honor cords to wear at graduation. 

"Being a member of an honor 
society looks good on your resume," 
Tiffany Thomas, a current member, 
said. 




Submitted photo 

Pictured above: members of NSU's Purple Jackets. The RSO is currently seeking new members. 



CAPA sends message to earthquake victims:'Song for Japan' set for next week 

Courtesy of News Bureau 



Northwestern State Universi- 
ty's Mrs. H.D. Dear Sr. and 
Alice Estelle Dear School of 
Creative and Performing Arts will 
present a concert intended to send a 
musical goodwill message to earth- 
quake victims in northern Japan on 
the anniversary of the natural disas- 
ter. "A Song for Japan" will begin at 
8 p.m. Friday, March 23 in Magale 
Recital Hall. 

According to Dr. Masahito Ku- 
roda, concert organizer, "A Song for 
Japan" was originally composed by 
Dutch composer Steven Verhelst and 
has been performed around the world 
"to send musical good thoughts to 
people who are suffering due to the 
catastrophic tsunami and earthquake 
in northern Japan." Kuroda is assis- 
tant professor of euphonium, tuba, 
sound recording and music technol- 
ogy at Northwestern State and is a 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 




native of Japan. 

"It is 1 2 months this March since 
the disaster and the rebuilding of lost 
communities has been very difficult 
over there," Kuroda said. "For this 
occasion, I have arranged the music 



to include all the NSU brass play- 
ers, choir, percussions and piano, 
both students and faculty. This new 
arrangement for mass ensemble is 
going to be world premier event that 
night and video of the concert will 



Wednesday 

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be sent to Japan as a musical gift." 

The concert will feature the NSU 
Chamber Choir under the direction 
of Dr. Burt Allen, the NSU Con- 
cert Choir under the direction of Dr. 
Chris Gilliam, the NSU Trumpet En- 



Saturday 



semble under the direction of Galin- 
do Rodriguez, the NSU Horn Choir 
under the direction of Dr. Kristine 
Coreil, the NSU Trombone Choir 
directed by Dr. Mark Thompson, 
the NSU Euphonium-Tuba Ensem- 
ble directed by Kuroda, pianist Dr. 
Christine Allen, and the NSU Per- 
cussion Studio under the direction of 
Ken Green. 

"The performance is a part of 
worldwide musical project called 
Song for Japan-East Japan Earth- 
quake Tsunami Charity Collabora- 
tion Project," Kuroda said. "It was 
started by a group of trombone play- 
ers in Japan and Europe shortly after 
the catastrophic earthquake and tsu- 
nami disaster in March 2011, which 
took approximately 16,000 lives. As 
of February 2012, 3,300 people are 
still missing." 

The project commissioned a mu- 
sical work, and with the composer's 
permission, made "A Song for Ja- 



pan" available to musicians around 
the world through the Internet so it 
can be performed by anyone. 

"It is a beautiful melody which 
can be arranged to wide variety 
of instrumentation," Kuroda said. 
"They ask the musicians to video 
record the performance and send 
it electronically to them as well as 
posting it on YouTube.com, so that 
they can show the performances to 
the people in the affected area as a 
musical goodwill present from peo- 
ple around the world." 

Since its launch, professional and 
amateur musicians from around the 
globe have responded, ranging from 
the musicians of the Berlin Philhar- 
monic, New York Philharmonic and 
European music conservatory pro- 
fessors to middle school trombonists 



For rest of story, see 
www.nsufa.edu 



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Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
tiffanythomas4@gmail.com 
March 14, 2012 






Alpha Phi Alpha hosts week of events 

Tiffany Thomas 

Life Editor 




Submitted photo 

SAB members photographed at last year's Spring Fling. This year's event will feature similar events including 
a crawfish boil. 

Let the good times roll 



Alexis Reliford 

Staff Writer 

Midterms are finally over and 
students can take a break 
from non-stop studying. 
Exhausted frowns on faces 
have suddenly changed into smiles 
as students breathe a sigh of relief 
and get ready to enjoy the rest of the 
spring semester. But what's there 
to do? 

Coming soon to a campus near 
you is Spring Fling 2012. This 
year's theme is "Laissez Les Bons 
Temps Rouler," meaning "Let the 
Good Times Roll!" It will be held 
on Wednesday, March 28 from 2 



p.m. to 6 p.m at the NSU Tailgating 
Field. 

Spring Fling is an annual event 
hosted by the Student Activities 
Board. 

"I'm very excited about Spring 
Fling this year," junior Austin 
McCann said. "Planning wasn't 
that hard because I had an awesome 
group of 1 5 helping me plan it." 
McCann, SAB's Executive Rep at 
Large, is in charge of planning large 
events such as Spring Fling. 

According to McCann, at the 
event students will be able to fill 
their stomachs with all the crawfish 
and jambalaya they want. 

They will also have the 
opportunity to make personalized 



street signs, take funny pictures 
with their friends in the photo booth 
and get wet on the gigantic water 
slide. Drinks and an oxygen bar will 
also be provided by Fresh Campus. 

T!.wrc'!l be no shortage of 
entertainment at this year's event as 
Chris Ardion, a zydeco accordionist 
and singer, will be performing. Also 
showcasing its talents is NSU's 
Glee Club. 

"This is my first year, and I'm 
excited to see how everything turns 
out," freshman Matt Spence said. 

The event and activities are 
free with a student I.D. and current 
spring 2012 sticker. 



Theatre department to produce 'As it is in Heaven' 




Cast members Victoria Olivier, Morgan Mosley, Eileen Peterson, Coryn Bourgeois and Natalie Sibille. 

Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State University Theatre and Dance will present As it is in Heaven March 14-17 at 7:30 
p.m. in the A.A. Fredericks Auditorium. Dr. Vicki Parrish is the director. Andrew Lewis is musical 
director. 

Tickets are $15 and SI 2 for senior citizens and non-Northwestern State students. NSU and Louisiana 
School for Math, Science and the Arts are admitted free with a current student I.D. Tickets are available 
online at theatre.nsula.edu. 

As it is in Heaven is a moving portrayal of upheaval caused when the Utopian existence of an 1830s 
Shaker community in Kentucky is threatened by the arrival of "newcomers" claiming to see angels. 
Critics have called the play "powerful and insightful... a thought-provoking piece, the message being that 
often we need not look as far as heaven to see angels here on earth." 

They had a communal living situation bound together by their Shaker beliefs," said Parrish. "Women 
in the community could vote and had equal authority. The conflict comes when two newcomers enter the 
community. They are more modern with a rebellious streak that doesn't sit well with the structure of the 
community." 

Members of the cast are Coryn Bourgeois of St. Amant, Tori Cormier of Moss Bluff, Amber English 
of Port Allen, Rachel Harper and Hannah Williams of Baton Rouge, Taylor Morgan of Gonzales and 
Morgan Mosley of Fort Smith, Ark. The cast also includes Victoria Olivier of Lafayette, Eileen Peterson 
of Woodworth, Sarah Roberts of Chattanooga, Tenn., Natalie Sibille of Lafayette and Latreshia Stormer 
of Folsom. 

Eric Yeager of Fort Smith, Ark., is stage manager and Ariana Michel of Slidell and Brandon Moore of 
Alvarado, Texas, are assistant stage managers. Kellie Bow les of Tyler, Texas, is set designer and Shalem 
Johnson of Marshall, Texas, is choreographer. 

"The message of the play is that finding simple gifts in life is what is important," said Parish. "Being 
caring and loving is a gift one can give the community without any monetary cost." 
For more information, call (318) 357-4483. 



This week the Theta Chi 
chapter of Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity, Inc 
presents Alpha Week 2012, title 
"Undisputed." 

Alpha Phi Alpha prides itself on 
being the first black Greek-lettered 
organization and much of that pride 
went into the conception of the 
theme for the Theta Chi chapter's 
spring week. 

In addition, Alpha Week 
chairman, Timothy Rice said, "The 
high expectations we had for the 
events planned" also birthed the 
'Undisputed' theme." 
"We truly felt as though this would 
be the week that brought life to 
the campus by bringing back the 
excitement that this institution 
[NSU] has been lacking for a while 
now," Rice added. 

"Undisputed" is currently 
underway, but don't worry, there 
are still more events left in the week 
you can still attend. 
Today is day four of "Undisputed" 
and the Alphas present "Ring 
Side" in which there will be prize 
giveaways in the Student Union 
lobby from 1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m. Later 
this evening will be the Women's 
Appreciation Program in the 
Student Union Ballroom from 7 
p.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is free, 
but the members request that those 
who attend are dressed in semi- 
formal attire. 

The Alphas want the student 
body to get ready for some fun 
Thursday as they host the "50 Cents 
Party" at the Martin Luther King 
Jr. Recreation Center. Admission 
is only 50 cents, and the doors will 
open at 10:36 p.m. 




Photo by Stephen Llorens 
Alpha Week 2012 is titled "Undisputed" and will have many events for 
students. 



On Friday i. re will be a field 
day event at uV President's field on 
campus starting at 2 p.m. There will 
be food, drinks, music and games. 

Saturday, the final day of 
Alpha week is strictly set aside for 
members of the fraternity, but the 
Alphas hope that students will enjoy 
the events left for the week. 



"The only thing we expect to gain 
from this week is that our fellow 
peers and the entire student body 
realize how much we appreciate 
them for the love and support they 
give us," Rice said 

Students can follow the Alphas 
on Twitter @NSU_Alphas for 
updates on events and general 
Alpha business. 



The college party: Where anything goes except clothes 



Jacob Labutka 

Fashion Columnist 

ithout a doubt you will be 

Wat many parties throughout 
your college career and 
many of which will have a 

theme. 

The theme that best allows 
you to creatively express yourself 
by arousing intrigue (or scandal) 
is ABC (Anything But Clothes). 
Although there are a plethora of 
pizza boxes and trash bags out 
there, it's sometimes difficult to 
decide what to do with these non- 
clothing items to make you stand 
out. Allow me to advise you on 
how to inspire a cutting edge 
look with the least conventional 
materials. 

There are certain common ABC 
outfits that are easily assembled but 
will not distinguish you from others 
in the crowd. If you have a strong 
desire to use your linens or have 
been watching movie marathons 
starring the stereotypical drunken 
frat boy, then I'd suggest wearing 
a toga. 

Perhaps the party starts in a 
few hours and you want to find 
splashes of color and shine amongst 
something you have, like leftover 
beads from Fat Tuesday for 
instance. You can put those beads 
to use by making a skirt or dress out 



of them over appropriately placed 
fabrics (as opposed to them just 
being buried in your closet). 

Another idea for your attire 
is to purchase items that would 
traditionally be used to decorate a 
party, except the festivity you'll be 
decorating is yourself. Anything 
from wrapping yourself in garland 
to recreating Madonna's pointy bra 
from party hats is fair game. 

Another one of the most 
common trends in ABC partying is 
utilizing duct tape. While this trend 
does run rampant at these parties, 
it comes in many different patterns 
and colors and can recreate almost 
any article of clothing. 

It is also good to take into 
consideration the utilization of those 
accessories that are normally meant 
as complements to clothing. 

For example, the image 
showcases sophomore Desiree 
Hatten wearing an outfit fit for 
public nightlife that is designed 
entirely out of scarves. 

Keep in mind that I've only but 
given a few ideas from the endless 
number there are considering you 
can wear anything but clothes. 
Getting dressed for ABC may not 
be as easy as 1-2-3, but it does 
offer endless creative possibilities 
without the constraints of traditional 
clothing. 




Desiree Hatten 



"A Commitment to Serve 



* LEE * 



#282 



POSEY 



Kmwil »9 

MBEf " M ft H| i iHi 



282 



/ 




Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
March 14, 2012 



'Slut-shaming' and victim blaming in a rape culture 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
editor 



After the ordeal involving 
Rush Limbaugh on February 
29*, the word "slut- 
shaming" seemed to be everywhere 
I looked on the Internet. 

From comments on a celebrity's 
Facebook account (where a man 
from New York questioned why 
America seemed to "hate" women) 
to blogs writing on the Sandra Fluke 
controversy specifically, the Internet 
was abuzz with this new term. To be 
honest, I was surprised at the things 
I learned when I looked delved 
deeply into this subject. 

"Slut-shaming" is defined as 



a "the idea of shaming and/or 
attacking a woman or a girl for 
being sexual, having one or more 
sexual partners, acknowledging 
sexual feelings, and/or acting on 
sexual feelings" according to the 
blog FinallyFeminismlOl. 

This is not a new phenomenon, 
women have been coping with 
something called a "rape culture" 
for years. Slut-shaming and victim 
blaming are all a part of a rape 
culture that blames women for 
being raped. 

This may seem unlikely, but a 
few years ago a woman's case was 
thrown out of court for just this 
reason. Melanie Ross of Georgia 
reported a rape by a man she had 
gone on a date with, but the judge 
seemed to dismiss the importance 
of her case because of her sexual 



history. 

A number of cuts and bruises 
on her body were presented as 
evidence of her assault, but they 
were ultimately written off by the 
judge as incidental. The judge 
questioned Ross on her sexual 
history in the courtroom and came 
to the understanding that a woman 
who willingly has sex with men 
could not possibly say no in any 
other case. 

Though Ross said that she 
had been drugged and had no 
recollection of the evening, the 
judge decided that this meant there 
could be no real proof of the rape. 
Not only did Ross lose her trial, 
she was fined $150,000 of the 
defendant's court costs. 

While this is an extreme 
example, it is not the only one. 



Women all over the world are 
constantly ignored when they tell 
authorities that they have been 
sexually abused. If not ignored, they 
are told it was their fault because 
they were sexually active or because 
they were dressed a certain way. 

This leads to what I mentioned 
before: a culture in which a woman 
can be blamed for being raped. 
This is the reason that many rapes 
go unreported. A fight against this 
started last year in Toronto. The 
first annual SlutWalk was held 
in support of women who were 
blamed or ignored. 

The SlutWalk started when 
a Toronto police officer said: 
"Women should avoid dressing like 
sluts in order not to be victimized." 
In protest of these kinds of ideas, 
women proceeded down the streets 



carrying signs that read: "Why are 
my clothes louder than my voice" 
and "Society teaches 'Don't get 
raped' rather than 'Don't rape'." 

While the effectiveness of 
the SlutWalk can be disputed, it 
definitely brings women together 
for a cause that may go unnoticed 
by those who are not victims. 

Here is something to know about 
sexual assault: women are usually 
assaulted by people they know. The 
"stranger in the bushes" scenario 
is not as likely as being assaulted 
by a friend, lover, or relative. More 
than half of female rape victims 
(51.1%) report being assaulted by 
an intimate partner and 40.8% by 
an acquaintance. That leaves only 
around 8% of victims who were 
assaulted by someone they did not 
know. 



According to a statistical average 
over the years in the United States, 
it seems that most female victims 
of rape were victimized before the 
age of 25 (79.6%). If you would 
like to know more about these 
statistics, please go to: www.cdc. 
gov/ViolencePrevention. 

If you or someone you know is 
the victim of a sexual assault, please 
immediately call the police and 
demand that a rape kit be done on 
you. Call a friend to go with you, 
Your clothes, the way you walk, the 
way you talk, or where/when you 
are out DO NOT matter. All that 
matters is that you did not give your 
consent. 

There is no reason to feel 
ashamed or guilty. The perpetrator 
is the one who has a problem, never 
the victim. 



Rants: Against phony Kony-ism 



Ml 



Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



ecently in the greater social 
1-^ world there has been much 
^jublicity devoted towards 
a man known as Kony, who has 
been something of a holy warlord 
in Uganda. Not knowing much 
about the issue, I have gathered the 
following. 

Kony's biggest crime has been 
the recruitment of child soldiers 
for his militant rebel group named 
Lord's Resistance Army, which has 
been a thorn in the side of Uganda 
for the past couple of decades. The 
International Criminal Court has 
indicted Kony as of 2006. 



So, if he has been at the 
freedom fighting for two decades 
and indicted by the ICC, why is a 
documentary being made six years 
later? 

And why is the Kony issue 
blowing up everyone's email and 
Facebook pages? 

The documentary was made by 
Invisible Children, Inc. Information 
taken from Wikipedia on this 
film states that the purpose of the 
film was to raise awareness in 
hopes (used instead of "effort") of 
removing the already indicted Kony. 

The very thought of filming a 
documentary seems redundant to 
me. Since the highest court in the 
world has outlawed him and the 
United Nations has already indicted 
him, I believe the world is already 
quite aware, thank you very much. 

Not to mention his LRA is 
considered a terrorist organization 



by the United States since the 
September 1 1 attacks. 

So these simple facts pertaining 
to the prior awareness of Mr. Kony 
should be the end of any discussion 
on raising awareness. The powers 
already understand the situation. 

Which brings about the question: 
'What is another purpose of this 
documentary?' And I do mean 
"another." 

As hinted above, the film has 
been successful in gaining attention 
and more importantly, donations. 
Since the video has only been out 
for a week or so, it is hard to see 
how much they have gained or 
stand to gain. 

I have heard estimates of 4o 
percent of profits directly aiding 
those in opposition to Kony, which 
already sounds vague. But again, 
that is all hearsay and too soon 
to tell. However, there are kits of 



bracelets and posters for sale. 

As we all know, posters, along 
with 30-minute films and Facebook, 
are vital and crucial for removing 
old and evil organizations in remote 
parts of Africa (of which there are a 
dime a dozen). Hilarity ensues. 

In addition to this film for 
awareness (redundant), film for 
profit (corrupt) motivation, the 
magazine Foreign Affairs alleges 
that the film has slanted facts for 
the sake of sensationalism. Who 
knows? 

Unfortunately, it has been so 
recent and the sources are still 
inflammatory to a certain degree 
(which is why I opted for Wikipedia 
as my info being both neutral and 
convenient). It may be a while 
before we know the whole story 
of Kony 2012... or Kony for that 
matter. 

I am not arguing that he is a 



negative force in the world. I do 
think the man is crazy as he may 
have 88 wives and believes that 
oil (holy oil) will protect him from 
bullets. 

I also agree that using children 
to do one's evil work makes 
the situation more heinous and 
appalling, but in the words of one 
Youtube video, "thumbs-downing a 
Facebook page does not remove the 
man from power." 

And since he has not been 
removed from office, leave that 
matter to the powers that are already 
aware of him. It is the responsibility 
of the U.S. to act in accordance with 
and as a member of the ICC and the 
UN. 

Awareness is good, but 
awareness in the average citizen 
will be short lived and prove 
fruitless until the next charity 
movement arises. 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories written 
by students! 

Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every Mon- 
day at 6 p.m. We 
hope to hear from 
you! 

- Current Sauce 
staff 




St: 

^BUTTRUE 

By Samantha Weaver 

• It was noted American wit and 
columnist Franklin P. Adams who 
made the following sage observa- 
tion: "Elections are won by men and 
women chiefly because most people 
vote against somebody rather than for 
somebody." It's certainly something 
to keep in mind during this strife-rid- 
den election season. 

• Americans make more collect 
phone calls on Father's Day than on 
any other day of the year. 

• It was a German company, Inter- 
stuhl Manufactur, that made the 
world's most expensive office chair. 
With a price tag of $65,500. you 
shouldn't be surprised that the chair 
is plated in gold and comes with a 
matching ottoman. 

• Have you ever wondered where 
we got the phrase "the dog days of 
summer"? According to tradition, the 
dog days start in July — and not just 
because it's usually pretty hot then. At 
one time, that was when Sirius, also 
known as the dog star, rose at sunrise. 
The Romans associated Sirius (called 
the dog star because it is the brightest 
star in the constellation Canis Major, 
or "large dog") with hot weather, and 
at the beginning of the dog days they 
would sacrifice a dog in the hope of 
ameliorating the sultry weather. 

• If you were to take the entire 
world's water supply and compress 
it into one single gallon, freshwater 
would make up just 4 ounces, and 
freshwater that is easily accessible 
w ould be just two drops. 

• Considering the fact that it's home 
to much of the American film indus- 
try, it's probably not surprising that 
the sprawling city of Los Angeles 
has the world's third-largest GMR or 
gross metropolitan product. 



c 


urrentSauce 


Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 


Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 


Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 


Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 


^^^^ 


Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 


Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 




Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 


Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 


Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 


Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



KATZENJAMMER KIDS 



BYHYEISMAN 



IT'S STUPIC? 
TO BE LOOK'INK 
FER BOIDS IN 
PISS VTPI7ER 




ACROSS 

1 Break 
suddenly 

5 $ dispenser 

8 Actress 
Sorvino 

12 Luxurious 

13 Carnival 
city 

14 Prayer 
ending 

15 Not 
domestic 

17 Bridge 

18 Checked 
out 

19 Old 
Portuguese 
money 

21 Praise in 
verse 

22 Carpet style 

23 Sapporo 
sash 

26 Lab goings- 
on (Abbr.) 

28 Dada artist 
Max 

31 Weaponry 

33 Antiquated 

35 Of planes 
and such 

36 Phi Beta - 
38 Meadow 

40 Rotation 
duration 

41 Steals from 
43 Latin 101 

word 

45 Sesame 
Street's 
Oscar, e.g. 

47 Super-active 



King Crossword 



1 


2 


3 




1 




6 








9 


10 


11 


12 
















1 










15 








16 


















18 














19 


20 










■21 








22 








23 


24 


25 1 


26 




27 




28 






29 


30 


31 






32 




33 




34 




35 








36 








37 




38 




39 


■40 






■ 41 






42 




43 




44 1 


45 


46 












47 






48 


49 


50 


51 












53 














54 






= 


1 


55 






1 


56 








57 










58 








59 









person 

51 Guns the 
engine 

52 Begged 

54 Sheltered 

55 By way of 

56 Locate 

57 Physiques, 
slangily 

58 Novelist 
Radcliffe 

59 Crazes 

DOWN 

1 Skewer 

2 Iditarod 
terminus 

3 Venomous 
vipers 

4 Pic 

5 Erie's style 



6 Dead heat 

7 Fashions 

8 Eyelash 
enhancer 

9 Attacked 
verbally 
Peruse 
— Domini 

16 Cincinnati 

team 
20 That boat 

23 Erstwhile 
acorn 

24 Support 
system? 
Made better 
Under the 
weather 

29 Spanish Mrs. 

30 Gift from 
Santa 



10 
11 



25 
27 



32 


Husband 




and wife 


34 


Very inex 




pressive 


37 


1970 




Jackson 5 




hit 


39 


— nitrate 


42 


Hindu 




destruction 




god 


44 


Switch type 


45 


Snatch 


46 


Move, in 




Realtor- 




speak 


48 


Met melody 


49 


Repair 


50 


Probability 


53 


Hr. fraction 




The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at www. 

thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 
March 14,2012 



Grimes earns scholarships from NCAA 



Upcoming Games 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

Northwestern State pitch- 
ing star Kelee Grimes, who 
ranked among NCAA soft- 
ball's top pitchers as a junior last 
season, is one of 26 recipients of a 
2012 Ethnic Minority and Women's 
Enhancement Scholarship awarded 
by the NCAA. 

Grimes, a senior from Pineville, 
will be formally awarded a S6.000 
postgraduate scholarship in June at 
the NCAA's Career in Sports Forum. 
Grimes plans to enroll in NSU's 
Sports Administration program in 
the Health and Human Performance 
department. 

"I have been privileged to serve 
on athletic committees that have ex- 
posed me to the opportunities avail- 
able to women in the administration 
side of sports," Grimes said. "The 
experience 1 have gained through 
my work with the department staff 
and the women that work in our 
academic center has inspired me to 
work with student-athletes." 

Grimes is on pace to graduate 
in May, majoring in business ad- 
ministration with a minor in fashion 
merchandising. She plans to pursue 
a master's degree in order to apply 
herself in a career in collegiate ath- 
letics. 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Kelee Grimes pitches a strike down the middle of the plate. She has an ERA of 3.30 and record of 5-5. 



"In addition to the fact that Kelee 
is one of a select few student-ath- 
letes nationwide to be so honored, it 
is even more exciting to me because 
of the fact that her advance degree 
and career plans involve working in 
the field of intercollegiate athletics," 
NSU Athletics Director Greg Burke 
said. 

"She certainly is going to be an 
asset to any athletic department that 



is fortunate enough to have her on 
staff." 

The Ethnic Minority and Wom- 
en's Enhancement Postgraduate 
Scholarship for Careers in Athlet- 
ics programs were developed by the 
NCAA Committee on Women's Ath- 
letics and the NCAA Minority Op- 
portunities and Interests Committee. 
The NCAA awards 13 scholarships 



to ethnic minorities and 13 scholar- 
ships to female college graduates 
who will be entering their initial year 
of postgraduate studies. 

In order to be selected, applicants 
must have performed with distinc- 
tion as a student body member at 
their respective undergraduate insti- 
tution. 

The applicant's involvement in 



extracurricular activities, course 
work, commitment to pursuing a ca- 
reer in intercollegiate athletics and 
promise for success in such a career 
is considered. 

"From the moment Kelee set foot 
on campus, and even during her re- 
cruiting visit, it was apparent she 
had the drive and dedication to be 
a special student-athlete at NSU," 
Burke said. 

"She has worked hard to be a 
complete Division I student-athlete, 
while carrying herself in a profes- 
sional and humble manner, and is 
a most deserv ing recipient of this 
prestigious NCAA postgraduate 
scholarship." 

On the field, Grimes has a thrown 
two career no-hitters and is a two- 
time Southland Conference Pitcher 
of the week winner and also won 
LSWA Pitcher of the Week last 
week. 

She was named to the 201 1 SLC 
All-Academic Team, All-Louisiana 
Collegiate Softball Team and Capi- 
tal One All-Academic District VI 
Team. 

This season. Grimes was named 
to the 2012 Preseason All-SLC Sec- 
ond Team after ranking 1 8th nation- 
ally with a 1.51 ERA in 2011. She 
currently leads the team with five 
wins, a 3.30 ERA and 85 strikeouts 
in 57.1 innings. 



STATE 




Conference Gam 




Corpus Christ! Mar. 1 6 
Corpus Christi Mar. 1 7 
McNeese 
McNeese 
SFA 
SFA 
SFA 



Mar. 23 
Mar. 24 
April 6 
April 7 
April 10 




5-3 



Bear's pinch hitting lifts Demons past McNeese Cowboys 



Courtesy of Sports Info 

A two-run pinch-hit single by 
Colin Bear with the bases 
loaded in the bottom of the 
sixth inning snapped a 2-2 tie and 
helped ignite a three-run frame as 
Northwestern State won the rubber 
match of the season-opening South- 
land Conference baseball series 
against McNeese State after a 5-3 
win on midday Sunday. 

The game was moved up to a 10 
a.m. start due to the threat of rain as 
the Demons improved their to 5-10 
on the season and 2- 1 in conference 
play while McNeese fell to 4-1 1 and 
1-2. 

"We knew the situation going 
in with the weather and felt like we 
had to get out to a quick start be- 
cause it could've been just a five or 
six inning game," said head coach 
J.P. Davis. "We did a really good 
job of getting a run in the first and 
then adding another." 

The Demons led 2-0 through 
three innings but McNeese would 
tie it in the fourth when Seth Grang- 
er popped a two-run shot over the 
right field wall in the fourth inning 
to knot the game up. 

"Granger is their (McNeese's) 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
With the bases loaded, Colin Bear snaps a 2-2 tie in the bottom of the 
sixth to give the Demons the win over McNeese State University. 



best guy and we got down in the 
count by not wanting to give him 
anything." said Davis. "We throw a 
fastball belt high and that's what that 
guy does. He's a good hitter and hits 
mistakes." 

The Demons landed three of their 
first four batters on base in the bot- 
tom of the sixth when Bear, who 
pitched a gem on Saturday with 
eight scoreless inning and allowed 
just one hit, stepped up to the plate 



and knocked a full count pitch up the 
middle to score Nick Hinojos and 
Nick Doughty to make it 4-2. 

Ray Frias followed with a two- 
out, RBI single through the left 
side that scored Kevin Sanford who 
pinch ran for Bear, and gave the De- 
mons a 5-2 lead. 

"Our guys did a great job of not 
allowing that tying home run to get 
them tight," said Davis. "We put up 
that three-spot in the sixth. Obvi- 



Student Media Leaders Needed 

Annual positions open starting summer 2012 

• Argus Editor in Chief 

• Current Sauce Editor in Chief 

• Potpourri Editor in Chief 

• KNWD General Manager 



Applications available for Potpourri and 
Current Sauce in Kyser Hall, RM 225 
Argus 31 6G or 316N 
KNWD 316D 



Deadline to submit: March 28 
Scholarships Available 

For more information, contact: 
Argus: Dr. Julie Kane, kanej@nsula.edu 
Current Sauce: Dr. Paula Furr, furrp@nsula.edu 
Potpourri: Mrs. Stephanie Masson, massons@nsula.edu 
KNWD: Arther Dew, dewa@nsula.edu 



ously, Bear w ith the big blow pinch 
hit. I felt like it was a really good 
matchup. Their guy has a good arm. 
Bear got ahead in the count and then 
their guy evened it, and with a 3-2 
count, Bear got a really good swing 
on the pitch. And that really was the 
difference in the ball game." 

Jacob Williford started the game 
on the mound of the Demons and 
threw four innings and gave up two 
runs on three hits with a walk and a 
strikeout. Mason Melotakis came in 
to hurl the remaining five frames to 
get the win and gave up one run on 
five hits, struck out four and walked 
none while moving his record to 1-1 
on the season. 

"I told Melotakis yesterday (Sat- 



urday) he was going to be the first 
guy out of the pen. Even though 
Willy (Williford) gave up that two 
spot, it was very important he got 
us at least four innings. We wanted 
five but we needed four. Melo came 
in and did a nice job in an extended 
outing for him. He did a really good 
job of pounding the zone with the 
fastball." 

McNeese starting pitcher Jacob 
Williams was lifted with one out in 
the second inning after he rolled his 
ankle on a pick off attempt to first 
base. That started a barrage of five 
more Cowboy pitchers the rest of the 
game. 

Michael Clemens, who closed 
out the win for the Cowboys in Sat- 



urday's doubleheader nightcap, took 
the loss after he allowed three runs 
on four hits with two walks and a 
strikeout in 2.1 innings pitched. 

Offensively, the Demons pounded 
out eight hits with Frias going 2-for- 
4 with a RBI and run scored to lead 
the way. Ryan Westbrook knocked 
in two runs on a l-for-4 game and 
Bear finished 1 -for- 1 with two RBI. 

The Demons also did a nice job 
in the field w ith some spectacular in- 
field grabs. 



For rest of story, see 
nsudemons.com 



Upcoming home games 




3/21/2012 
3/23/2012 
3/24/2012 
3/25/2012 
3/30/2012 
3/31/2012 
4/1/2012 




I 




nt 




Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, March 28, 2012 ♦Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 21 



Aron Ralston tells Northwestern his story 



Alexis Reliford 
Sauce Reporter 

What would you do if you 
were literally stuck be- 
tween a rock and a hard 
place? Would you stay there and 
die. or would you make the difficult 
choice to cut off one of your limbs 
to set yourself free? 

These questions and many others 
are what experienced canyon climb- 
er Aron Ralston asked himself when 
an 800-pound boulder broke loose, 
crushed his right hand and forearm, 
and pinned him against a canyon 
wall in April 2003. 

Ralston spoke to NSU students 
Tuesday evening in A. A. Frederick's 
Auditorium. He vividly described 
the shocking details about his life-al- 
tering experience, and he apologized 
for not being James Franco. 

Ralston was descending a remote 
Utah canyon alone when he became 
stuck for over five days with no wa- 
ter or no way of escaping. Faced 
with life or death, he made the deci- 
sion to amputate his arm below the 
elbow using a multi-tool containing 
a dull two-inch knife. 

"It's an honor and a blessing not 
only to be alive but to also be able to 
share my story," Ralston said. 

Ralston wrote '"Between a Rock 
and a Hard Place," an international 
bestselling autobiography that docu- 
ments his experiences in a Utah can- 
yon. 

His accident and book were also 
the basis for the 2010 movie "127 
Hours" starring James Franco. Fran- 
co's performances, as well as the 
movie, were nominated for numer- 
ous awards. 

Hiking was nothing new to 
Ralston because to him they were 
like "Spring Break without the wet 
t-shirt contest." Mesmerized by the 
beauty of his natural surroundings , 
he parked his Jeep and rode his bike 
about eight miles into the canyon. 



Ralston then parked the bike and 
continued on foot for about another 
eight miles. 

Along the way he met two women, 
Megan and Kristi, who he showed 
around the canyon's paths before 
he separated from them. Ralston 
declined the invitation to join the 
two women to go see historic picto- 
graphs along the canyon walls. They 
would be the last people he saw for 
the next five days. 

When Ralston tried to go down 
into the canyon path he accidently 
dislodged the canyon and it fell on 
his arm and trapped him between 
the canyon's wall. He came to the 
realization that he would die in the 
canyon since he had not told anyone 
about his plans to go hiking. There- 
fore no one would know where to 
look for him. 

Ralston's original thought was 
"Dude you're going to have to cut 
off your arm," a thought he quickly 
shook away. His wrist was instantly 
crushed to the size of his pinky fin- 
ger. 

For the next couple of days he 
tried to escape the hold of the boul- 
der by chipping away at it and push- 
ing the boulder off of his arms. He 
had no food and had slowly become 
dehydrated because his water supply 
was short. Out of desperation to sur- 
vive, Ralston resorted to drinking his 
own urine. Ralston taped final good- 
byes to his family and friends using 
the camera in his backpack. 

On the fifth day, he carved his 
initials into, the sandstone as. well js. 
the day of his (predicted) death be- 
cause he was convinced he wouldn't 
survive until the next morning. 

Ralston knew someway, somehow 
he would survive this accident after 
he had a premonition where he saw 
a little blue-eyed boy run up to him 
smiling. When Ralston picked the 
boy up, he saw his arm was free. 

"One hundred and twenty seven 
hours later, I figured it out!" Ralston 
said. He revisited the idea of cutting 



off his arm and began the process at 
around 10:36 a.m. 

After realizing he couldn't cut 
through the bone, he used the boul- 
der as leverage to break a bone in his 
arm. At that moment most people 
would be screaming and crying but 
according to Ralston he was yelling, 
"AHHH YES!" 

He quickly remembered that there 
are two bones in your arm so he pro- 
ceeded to break the second bone and 
finished off the amputation by cut- ' 
ting the nerves and muscles and set 
himself free. 

Severing his own arm was one of 
the greatest pains he ever felt, but he 
was smiling. 

"I stepped out my grave and into 
my life again," Ralston said. 

He climbed up from within the 
canyon and hiked until he met a fam- 
ily who provided water and assis- 
tance. Fortunately, Ralston's mother 
had sent a search and rescue team 
for him after she had hacked into his 
email account and narrowed down 
his possible location. 

Around the time Ralston began 
amputating his arm, the rescuers had 
found his abandoned truck. If he had 
completed the amputation any soon- 
er, Ralston would have bled to death 
before being rescued. 

"It was all thanks to her," Ralston 
said, pointing to a picture of his 
mom on the screen. 

Ralston currently lives in Colo- 
rado with his wife Jessica and his 
blue-eyed son, Leo. The accident 
... hasn't stopped. JiaJston, from «jcplor-- 
ing more canyons and hiking, but 
he's always sure to leave a note now 
about where he's going. 

He noted that everyone has some 
sort of "boulder" in their life and 
that his boulder is the greatest thing 
that's ever happened to him. He 
hopes everyone can find greatness in 
his or her own boulders. 

"It's not about what you do that 
creates meaning, it's who you are." 




Aron Ralston speaks of his experiences to NSU students in A 



Photo submitted by Katie Beverly 
A. Fredericks Auditorium. 



Debate shows candidates' intent to get involved with students 




Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Staff Editor 

Jarred Roberts 



Monday afternoon marked 
the "big" debate between 
presidential candidates 
Derrick Houston, Sarah Spain, and 
Richard Sharp. The debate took 
place Monday at 5 p.m. on the sec- 
ond floor of the Student Union. 

Those students that did attend 
the debate were given the option to 
write down a question in the hopes 
that it would get asked to the candi- 
dates during the debate. 

The entire debate lasted around 
50 minutes so many questions 
were unanswered. The questioning 
section brought up topics such as 
campus security, student funds, di- 
versity and the immediate changes 
that would take place under the new 
president's term. 

All candidates did their best to 
fully answer the questions in the 
time allotted. While they did a good 
job of answering the questions of 
diversity and student funds, the an- 
swers to the questions concerning 
security were rather empty. 

Current President Tara Luck 
made an appearance and liked the 



answers given about diversity and 
how student funds were handled, but 
she would have liked to have seen 
more concrete plans in the candi- 
dates' answers. 

When asked what she wanted to 
see in the next term, Luck responded 
that she would like the effort she put 
into building a new Student Union to 
be continued. 

Luck also hopes for an increased 
presence of SGA members around 
campus and at events. The imple- 
mentation of SGA coffee breaks and 
social media websites has helped to 
increase this issue, but the current 
president would like to see this taken 
even further. 

The candidates' desire to increase 
SGA's presence on campus was ad- 
dressed in every candidate's rep- 
sonse for their immediate plans. 

Also present at the debates was 
freshman SGA member Mario Fort- 
son. He was impressed with how 
important the campus and its issues 
was to the campus. 

"It's not like in high school where 
it was just a popularity contest" Fort- 
son said. 

While he, like most others, would 
have liked to see more direct inter- 
actions between candidates, he was 



well on board with working with any 
candidate a a SGA member. 

Forston agrees with the push 
to make sure students are more in- 
formed. 

Some anonymous audience mem- 
bers had their own thoughts that 
included more than just who they 
should vote for. In addition to hop- 
ing for a more insightful debate, they 
were also hoping for a bigger turn- 
out. 

The debate was not very highly 
advertised, and while it hit an unof- 
ficial record amount of attendees, 
only 40 attendees were present out 
of a student body in the thousands. 

Student spirit, motivation, and in- 
volvement seems to be a prominent 
idea in this election. 

Candidate Ellie Spain's cam- 
paign motto is "Putting the U back 
in NSU". 

Candidate Richard Sharp spoke 
very well on diversity and how it 
was important to him on a person- 
al level. "I am the most diversified 
candidate up here" Sharp said in his 
closing statement. 

Candidate Derrick Houston ended 
his closing statement with his motto 
"Teamwork Makes the Dreamwork." 



Wednesday 

84759° 



Thursday 

86761° 



Friday 

82761° 




Saturday 

85763° 



Sunday 

87767° 



Monday 

78754° 



Tuesday 

81756° 




Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
tiffanythomas4@gmail.com 
March 28, 2012 



Original student work to premiere 



News Bureau 

Northwestern Theatre and 
Dance will present an original 
student production, A Work in 
Progress, March 30-3 1 at 7:30 p.m. 
and March 31 at 2 p.m. in Theatre 
West. Admission is free and open to 
the public. Timothy Callais is the di- 
rector. 

This play has been built from 
scratch using long-form improvisa- 
tion and scene study," said Callais, 
a theatre major from Baton Rouge. 
"We're taking the cast of six's real 
life experiences, and skeletons, 
wants and desires, throwing it into a 
big melting pot, creating substantial 
characters and improv ising magic." 

Members of the cast are Alexis 
Smith of Mandeville, Sharla Mills 
of Fourney, Texas. Myesha-Tiara 
McGarner and Shannon Harger of 
~aton Rouge, Tyler Price of New 
rleans and Sarah Folkins of Slidell. 

"We want to exhibit long-form 
provisation as a tool that any ac- 
writer or director can use." said 
allais. "We want to show the powei 
at can come between two people 
••1 what the human mind is capable 
f. There is no finished product in 
t, only deadlines." 

Callais said the cast is working 
' om a general outline, but is using 
the freedom they have to try new 
things." 

"It's informed improv. We know 
the characters, but what happens be- 
tween them isn't settled," he said. 




Myesha-Tiara McGarner, Tyler Price, Shannon Harger, Alexis Smith, Sarah Folkins, Sharla Mills 



"Every time could be something a 
little different." 

Price, a freshman, is doing his first 
improv work. 

"When I found out about this, 
I was both scared and excited," said 
Price. "I have never done anything 



like it, '^ut it has been rewarding and 
challenging for me. The character I 
play is loosely based on me and has 
forced me to face certain issues. I 
have enjoyed finding myself in the 
character." 

According to Callais, examples 



of long-form improv isation include 
films by director Christopher Guest 
like This is Spinal Tap. He thinks the 
issues explored will hit home with a 
college audience. 

"College such an important time 
for many people. It's a time when 



you go through new adventures," 
he said. "I'm very proud of my cast 
and our department for allowing me 
to do this type of experiment. It's 
working better than expected." 



Next 'Second Season' show tries new approach 



Caleb Strange 

n auce Reporter 

ForNSU's theatre 
players' next "Second 
Season" show, 
imothy Callais, a theatre 
irecting and performance 
lajor, will unveil his new 
and original production "A 
Work in Progress." Second 
Season" is the student 
directed and performed play 
erformances for the spring 
semester. 

"People shouldn't come 
to this show expecting to see 



something that they're used 
to," Callais said. "This is not 
your typical piece of theatre. 
Most of the actors will be 
seen in lights that people have 
never seen them in before." 

The show will be held this 
Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and 
Sunday at 2:00 and 7:30 p.m. 
at Theatre West on-campus. 

After each performance 
there will be a "talk back" 
where members of the 
audience will be able to ask 
questions and interact with 
the cast and crew. 

The show will be free and 



seats will be given away on a 
first come, first served-basis. 

This original piece is set 
around a college improv 
troupe that tackles hardships 
throughout the show such 
as first love, losing one's 
virginity, homosexuality and 
other problems encountered 
in college. 

An improv show is a 
show that has no script and is 
driven by the quick wits of its 
actors and, in some cases, the 
audiences are allowed to play 
along each performance. 

"I'm doing this show to 



prove that long form improv 
is a vital tool for the working 
actor," Callais said. "1 believe 
when it comes to art there 
are no final products just 
deadlines. ThistflKy wiff 
really bring out and show the 
power of connection between 
all of the actors." 

The play consists of six 
lead cast members: Alexis 
Smith, Sharla Mills, Sarah 
Folkins, Myesha-Tiara 
McGarner, Shannon Harger 
and Tyler Price. 

Using the audition for 
NSU's improve troup "Out on 



a Limb," the show was cast at 
the end of last semester. With 
rehearsal five nights a week 
for three hours a night, and 
with opening night around the 
corner, the cast and crew are 
polishing up their act. 

"This should be a fun 
show," Callais said. "The 
audience will have a chance 
to choose a word that is 
incorporated into the show. 
Everything has gone better 
than expected, and I look 
forward to presenting "A 
Work in Progress." 




Photo illustrations by Sue Barnett 

AAC to host second annual forum 

Tiffany Thomas 

Life Editor 

The question is "Who will survive in America?" 
NSU's African American Caucus (AAC) will be hosting its second annual forum posing this same 
question to students, faculty and the community. This year's theme, "Vote or Be Silent" is designed to 
convey the importance of voting to students. 

The objectiv e of the forum is to prov ide societal awareness by voicing individual opinions on how many 
American citizens still feel plagued by injustices in the nation. There will be a panel discussion including citizens 
from different backgrounds of life including NSU students, Natchitoches town officials and NSU professors. 

The panel w ill speak on premises including the war in Iraq, budget cuts for colleges, birth control and the ef- 
fects of social networking in today's society. 

AAC President Kenneth Brown encourages students to attend the forum and voice their concerns to the panel 
so that their voices can be heard. "A voteless people is a hopeless people," he said. 
This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. 
The date of the forum is to be announced. 



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Jacob 
Labutka 

Fashion 
Columnist 



The color 
wheel of 
fashion 



ince it has been an 
overall sunny week, 
this spring should inspire the 
sawy fashionista to wear 
brightly-colored colors to 
celebrate the new season. 

However, even among 
bright spring colors there 
seems to be variations of 
"what's hot" and "what's 
not." 

For every season, the 
color trends are chosen 
by organizations such as 
Color Association of the 
United States (CAUS) and 
Pantone. The committees 
are comprised of textile 
manufacturers and top 
designers who meet in these 
organizations to discuss the 
upcoming season's fashion 
color trends. 

The colors are selected 
based on what the committee 
members feel will reflect 
the season based on societal 
trends. However, the season's 
colors are chosen two years 
prior (i.e. Spring 2012 colors 
were selected in 20 1 0), which 
makes this a process of color 
forecasting. 

Fashion industry experts 
argue that choosing the 
colors two years ahead of 
time is necessary so textile 
manufactures can make the 
materials in these colors 
that designers will use. But 
how can you account for 
shifts in possible societal 
changes in two years (e.g. 
meteorologists' forecasts 
aren't always accurate)? 

Besides the apparent faults 
of color forecasting, most, 
if not all, of these decisions 
are based on fashion trends 
in major metropolitan areas. 
I recently watched Fashion 
Star, and I'm reminded of a 
judge saying something to the 
effect of "clothes shouldn't 
be designed just for Seattle or 
New York, but for America as 
a whole." 

I'm not saying that the 
colors chosen by CAUS 
and Pantone are the wrong 
colors to wear. However, I 
do believe that sometimes 
deviating from what others 
purport to be in fashion can 
still be fashionable in itself. 
We should still appreciate 
what these committee 
members do because they 
must put a lot of thought into 
the specific colors that are 
chosen each season. I'm sure 
they don't expect designers 
to make clothes in only 
10 colors for one season; 
it's more than likely just a 
suggestion of what will look 
good. 

In the end, the colors you 
wear depend on the colors and 
styles that look best on you 
and the colors aren't solely 
worn to adhere to a seasonal 
color scheme (that is probably 
similar to previous ones). 

Keep in mind the countless 
number of shades created 
from primary colors. I think 
we can agree that wearing 
all of any shade of black or 
brown in any warm season 
eats up too many rays of sun, 
unless you enjoy feeling like 
a boiled lobster. 




Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
March 28, 2012 



NSU 'Occupies' Wall St. at Zuccotti Park 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
editor 



The crowd chanted obscene 
phrases to the police as men 
from the Counterterrorism 
division surrounded protestors in 
Zuccotti Park. It is the six-month 
anniversary of the first Occupy Wall 
Street Movement. 

These movements have been a 
source of scandal for police officers 
across the country. Complaints 
of rough treatment and abuse of 
power have always shadowed these 
events. There was no change on this 
anniversary. 

The day started with a few 
officers in yellow safety vests 
patrolling the small park in 
Manhattan's Financial District. The 
protesters had arrived earlier that 
morning, but they were getting riled 
up. Although I have not seen the 
gritty underbelly of many protest 
rallies, I can not say I am sure of 
which "side" I may take. 

I arrived around 1 1 a.m. and 
had the good sense to leave before 
the movement became too violent 
(which it soon did). Something that 
begged my attention was that the 
protest was quickly devolving into 
an antagonizing movement directed 
at the police officers stationed 
nearby. Instead of protesting about 
financial issues, they were taunting 
the police officers. 

As much as I support the 
movement's cause, il think that 




Photo submitted by Catherine Beverly 
A man waves an "Occupy" flag at the six-month anniversary of Occupy Wall Street in Zuccotti Park. 



any large gathering of people who 
are passionate has the potential to 
quickly become out of control. This 
is proven when the crowd began to 
antagonize the police. Why does 
this matter? Because you are not 
supporting your cause by acting like 
a mob. 

And that is exactly what I 
saw: mob mentality. People were 



climbinsi on large planters and 

ist others im to chant 
Horn a height. They were chaining 
themselves to things around the 
park although no one had asked 
them to leave. 

I was bumped and pushed by on- 
lookers. A man asked me a question 
about a barricade the police had 
erected and when my answer did 



not satisfy him, he shoved me aside 
to*"** do* to the action. 

a hen a . ung female police 
officer asked a man to get off of the 
planter (I suppose you could say 
it was a safety risk to have all of 
those people towering over the rest 
of the crowd), he refused. This, in 
my opinion, is what started the ball 
rolling. 



Just so I can be clear, I do not 
condone any violent action taken 
by an organization, much less 
the police, but I do not think they 
should be villianized as the sole 
reason for some of these outcomes. 
They are just as human as the rest 
of us, and they are just as prone to 
making mistakes. 



(In some situations, it may be 
obvious that a certain group is to 
blame [silent/completely peaceful 
protests, etc.], but I am referring 
to protests that are chaotic and not 
well focused.) 

If you were standing alone in 
a crowd of almost two hundred as 
they threw insults at you, you could 
get flustered and defensive too. This 
is what I believe leads to most of 
the incidents reported by civilians. 

Some acts of violence may be 
committed on purpose; I am not 
implying that the police can do 
no intentional wTong. I am merely 
stating that if someone reports 
having their hair pulled or being 
pushed into a wall with a little too 
much force, that response could 
most definitely be because of the 
energetic and chaotic environment. 

Maybe this means that I am 
incredibly naive, but I just think 
(most) of these officers were just 
trying to do their job;they are 
part of the 99 percent. They have 
families and loved ones to support. 

Next time you are at a protest, or 
if you are reading about one on the 
internet, try to imagine what it was 
like. Take a moment to see it from 
the side of the group you deem the 
villains. The protesters and police 
officers are on the scene for similar 
reasons: safety. 

If you do not agree with mv 

article, or if yuu woiiiu io 

propose a different angle, please 
feel free to send a letter to "The 
Current Sauce" detailing your 
opinions. This is your newspaper, 
and we would love to hear from 
you. 




I hungry children 




Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



By now, many of you have 
perhaps seen the most 
recent fiction fad sweeping 
the nation, "The Hunger Games." 
Perhaps a smaller number of you 
have read the books or plan to 
read the books, for who could be 
bothered to read these days? 

As usual, I am opting out of this 
fad. I will neither waste my time or 
money on such a thing whose fame 
will last a month at most. 

You can call me crazy if you 
like. If this mov ie and other fads 
(that have also since come and 



gone) are of such significance to the 
human experience, you can count 
me out of being human too. 

I have two main problems 
that are intrinsic to "The Hunger 
Games." 

The first is this apocalypse fad 
(or even "post" apocalypse-ism) 
that has everyone's underwear in a 
bunch. I understand the excitement 
of the Mayans, The Book of 
Revelations, and Zombies. 

I know any combination of the 
three makes the end of the world 
seem likely in the next fifteen 
minute. 

And while these movies are 
exciting, I think the apocalypse 
theme has served its time well on 
the cinematic front. 

It is time to find a new genre for 
everyone to enjoy and for me to 



grow weary over. It has been played 
out. 

However, the story does seem 
appealing. Angsty teenagers fight to 
the death for survival. Brilliant! 

The second problem is the more 
disconcerting of the two. Did you 
all forget how appalled we were 
at Kony 2012? Do you have no 
memory of two weeks ago? 

Two weeks ago we were calling 
for the head of a man who makes 
children fight. And now two weeks 
we are cheering youngsters to their 
death in a movie. What happened? 

I understand that the children in 
"The Hunger Games" are not real, 
but I still find it odd. 

We can enjoy violence when it 
does not affect or cost us much, but 
if it is real and present in some part 
of the w orld we must eradicate it. 



How is this so? 

Now if a portion of the profit of 
The Hunger Games goes to help 
those in Uganda, I would be singing 
and cheering in the streets with 
bunched up underwear (same pair 
from above). 

However, in our (humans, not 
just the USA) selfish nature, that 
will be unlikely to happen. 

I bet all the money I would 
ever make to say that the Kony 
documentary will have less money 
made than "The Hunger Games" 
albeit both are ridiculous to me. 

Perhaps the children of Uganda 
and Africa will have another chance 
to satisfy our blood-thirst for 
violence in some fictitious thriller at 
the box office that we cannot even 
imagine yet. 



The 

CurrentSauce 



Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 



Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 




Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 



NSU 

Speaks 



What are your 
opinions on the 
recent case of 
the shooting 
of 17-year-old 
Trayvon Martin? 








1 

m mm 






1 <^k\ 


w 




' Though there should defi- 
nitely be an investigation 
into the incident. The case 
is a clear example of insti- 
tutionalized racism that has 
become commonplace in 
this countiy. " 

Kristen Hadley 
humanities and social 
thought. Sophomore 



"I think there should be a 
proper investigation before 
we form premature opin- 
ions. " 



Jason Johnson 
clinical psychology, first 
year graduate student 



"It is a real shame when the 
automatic reaction to see- 
ing someone you think looks 
threatening is to shoot to kill. 
It is clear that something in 
this country 7 must change. " 



Desiree Hatten 
psychology 1 , sophomore 



"I feel like the whole thing 
has blown way out of pro- 
portion. Everybody has an 
opinion, but not a lot of peo- 
ple have any education on 
the topic. " 



Marquez Wilson 
social work, freshman 



"I believe there was a se- 
rious bias on the part of 
the shooter. He jumped too 
quickly to conclusions, and a 
life was lost. It was sad. " 



Emma Harrison 

music education, freshman 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalkcr009@student.nsula.edu 
March 28, 2012 



NSU legends reflect on past 



Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 

Taking trips down memory 
lane usually involves older 
people telling stories to 
others that pretend to be interested. 
An occasional nod and forced 
laughter is enough to satisfy the 
speaker while they continue with 
their story. But that wasn't the case 
w hen three former Demon football 
legends got together for a round of 
golf at the first annual Legends Golf 
Scramble at Shreveport Country 
Club. 

Marcus Spears, Gary Reasons 
and Craig Nail captivated listeners 
as they told stories of their past 
times at NSU and in the NFL. 

Everyone applauded while 
Greg Burke, NSU athletic director, 
introduced the three as NSU 
legends. 

Spears, who was recently 
inducted into the Graduate "N" 
Club Hall of Fame, played 12 years 
in the NFL and was deemed "Best 
Dressed" at the golf tournament. He 
acknowledged the toughest question 
he is asked involves having to pick 
his most memorable moment while 
being a Demon. 

"I remember all the fun 1 had in 
a small town environment," Spears 
said. "The one thing I took from 
NSU is that small town mentality 
that makes you work hard, and I 
try to instill that in younger people 
today." 

Spears wasn't highly recruited, 
since he played only one year of 
high school football, and NSU was 




Submitted photo 

From left to right: Marcus Spears, Gary Reasons and Craig Nail pose before tee-off time at the first annual Legends Golf Tournament. 



the only college looking to land the 
Baton Rouge native. Despite his 
novitiate, he quickly developed into 
a NFL prospect. 

"It's still feels like a dream. 1 



w as paid a king's ransom to play a 
game," Spears said. 

Gary Reasons arrived at NSU 
in a similar fashion. Like Spears, 
Reasons wasn't highly recruited out 



of high school even though he won 
first team All-State in Texas. 

"I think the thing I'm most proud 
of is getting an education," Reasons 
said. 



He was the first in his family to 
attend a college and one of the few r 
people from his high school to play 
collegiate football. 

He earned first team Ail- 
American accolades his sophomore, 



junior and senior years, making 
him the first player to do so in FCS 
Division 1-AA history. 

Reasons played on a team that 
was well equipped to win countless 
titles. As a freshman, he was a 
teammate with former NFL players 
Bobby Hebert, Joe Delaney and 
Mark Duper. 

"We had talent like no other 
program." Reasons said. "We just 
didn't win enough ball games, but it 
w as a fun time with my teammates." 

Craig Nail's stint at NSU was 
short but just as impressive. Nail 
transferred from LSU and played 
one year as a Demon quarterback. 
Like the others, Nail had a tough 
time picking the most memorable 
moment. Nail explained that 
his time as a Demon was full of 
wonderful experiences. 

One of his favorite football 
experiences involved beating TCU, 
who was ranked fifth in the nation. 

"We supposedly didn't have a 
chance against them. We didn't 
have that attitude. We went in 
expecting to win and we did." 
Nail also met his wife of sev en 
years at NSU. 

"My main focus was to 
play football," Nail said. "I 
definitely w asn't looking to start a 
relationship. Our circles mingled, 
and after the third time she asked if 
I was going to ask for her number, 
and the rest is history." 

"I'm very fortunate to have that 
opportunity and that would have 
never happened if I didn't come to 
Northwestern State University," 
Nail added. 



high school football, and NSU was "It's still feels like a dream. I Reasons wasn't highly recruited out said. He earned first team All- Na)1 added 

American accolades his sophomore, 

1st place Demons sweep the Cardinals with 10-5 win 

MHMMMMHHM Courtesy of Sports Info: pitch over the the deepest the sixth innings as the Der 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Ryan Westbrook provides the Demons with a sac bunt to advance a runner. The Demons beat Lamar 10-5. 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

A lead-off home run by Lamar 
to start the game wasn't 
enough to rattle Northwest- 
ern State starting pitcher Andrew 
Adams as he settled to allow just 
three more hits an no runs through 
6.1 innings, meanwhile designated 
hitter Matt Farmer knocked in a 
career-high five runs, including a 
go-ahead two-run home run in the 
bottom of the second inning to help 
lead the Demons to a 10-5 Southland 
Conference baseball sweep over the 
Cardinals Sunday afternoon. 

The win moved the Demons to 
10-12 overall and 7-2 in conference 
play as they remain tied for first 
place in the league standings with 
Sam Houston State who finished 
off a sweep over preseason favorite 
Texas State. Lamar dropped to 8- 1 5 
and 1-8 in the Southland. 

Adams (1-2) notched his first 
win of the year after he allowed just 
the one run and struck out five bat- 
ters to just one walk. Four more De- 
mons pitched out of the bullpen the 
remainder of the 2.2 innings as Joe 
Scanio wrapped things up by pitch- 
ing a scoreless ninth to close out the 
win. 

The Cardinals jumped on Adams 
early when Jude Vidrine hit a 3-1 



pitch over the wall at the deepest 
part of the field in center field but 
it almost went for naught as center 
fielder Drew Helenihi reached over 
the wall to attempt the rob, but the 
ball ricocheted off the front part of 
his glove and fell outside the park 
for the home run. Adams got the 
next three batters out and didn't al- 
low another hit until one out in the 
fifth inning. 

"He (Adams) was up in the zone 
early and getting behind batters but 
when we got the lead, he settled 
down, got some ground ball and was 
able to strike some guys out, which 
is what we expected of him," said 
head coach J.R Davis. 

After falling behind 1-0, Farmer, 
who was making just his sixth ap- 
pearance on the season and led the 
team with a 3-for-5 showing at the 
plate, put the Demons up for good 
with his two-run home run over the 
right field wall one batter after Will 
Watson reached on an error by La- 
mar starting pitcher Colin Chapman. 

The Demons opened things up in 
the third with a four-run inning with 
Farmer coming through once again 
with a tw o-run single to cap off the 
scoring and giving the Demons a 6-1 
lead. 

Adams sat down 12 of the 14 La- 
mar batters from the third through 



the sixth innings as the Demons kept 
putting up the runs - two in the fifth 
and two in the sixth, to take a 10-1 
lead. 

"Farmer has been a pinch-hitter 
role player for us so far this season 
and hasn't really had a start yet," said 
Davis. "With our DH guys strug- 
gling a bit lately, and after batting 
practice this morning, Mac (hitting 
coach Jeff McCannon) and I decided 
to pencil him in the lineup because it 
was a good matchup for him." 

In addidtion to Farmer's three hits 
to lead the team's 1 1 -hit attack., first 
baseman Nick Hinojos had a 2-for- 
4 day with two runs scored while 
Helenihi finished 2-for-5 with two 
runs scored. 

Chapman (0-2) took the loss for 
Lamar after he lasted 2.2 innings and 
gave up six runs on four hits with 
two walks and 1 1 strikeouts. 

Offensively, the Cardinals put up 
eight hits as center fielder Joe Arech- 
iga and first baseman Seth Dornak 
led the way with two hits apiece. 

The sweep was the first for the 
Demons over Lamar since the 
2006 season and NSU is out to its 



For rest of story, see 
nsudemons.com 




We need writers! 

Our newspaper needs stories written by students! 

Come by our office, 227 Kyser, if you would like to join. 

Meetings every Monday at 6 p.m. We hope to hear 
from you! 



- Current Sauce staff 



4 







Northwestern State University 



Wednesday, April 4, 2012 * Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 22 



Months of work rewarded at Research Day 



Aaron Dean 

Sauce Reporter 

After students and faculty 
spent hundreds preparing for 
a single event, it began. 
They presented their projects 
in 30-minute blocks, and scores of 
others worked behind the scenes to 
pull the event together. It was a day 
for exploring horizons and delving 
deeper into professions. It was Re- 
search Day. 

Fifty-one students and faculty pre- 
sented their projects last Thursday, 
occupying Morrison Hall from 8:20 
a.m. to 4:20 p.m. People presented 
projects ranging from microbiology 
to studies in propaganda throughout 
the day. 

The organizers arranged a break 
from 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., but it 
wasn't a break for everyone. 

More than 100 people converged 
in the Student Union Ballroom for 
the celebratory awards and speech- 
es, and 30 additional poster-board 
projects were displayed. Awards 
were distributed, and Louisiana Poet 
Laureate Dr. Cane read some of her 
poetry. 

Dr. Andy Crank, from the Lan- 
guage and Communications De- 
partment, won the Dr. Mildred Hart 
Bailey Award. This award is given 
in acknowledgement of outstanding 
research or distinguished creative 
work. 




Photo submitted: News Bureau 

Saul Caranco and Christian Marks won the Student Research Awards for their research in microbial biology. They were two of many presenters. 



Dr. Karen McFerrin won the Dr. 
Jean D'Amato-Thomas Lifetime 
Achievement Award. According to 
an NSU news release, this is given 
in honor of a senior faculty member 
who has committed significant re- 
search and service in their discipline. 

McFerrin has worked in technol- 
ogy integration, technology leader- 



ship in the schools, use of software in 
the learning process, and researched 
educational technology. 

The newest award, The Dr. Mari- 
etta LeBreton award, did not have a 
first-time winner — it had two. 

Maty Linn Wernet, the Watson 
Library head archivist and records 
officer, and Dr. Hiram Gregory, pro- 



fessor of anthropology, tied for the 
award. The award is given to those 
whose careers involved research 
strongly connected to Louisiana. 

But not all of the awards went 
to the faculty-Annabelle Jones, a 
senior in fine and graphic arts with 
a concentration in studio art, was 
recognized for her design on the Re- 



search Day poster and program. 

An internal panel evaluated design 
entries based on "integrity, appropri- 
ateness and appeal to the layperson." 
The winner needed to be creative 
while meeting these requirements. 

Saul Carcamo and Christian 
Marks, two seniors in the Louisiana 
Scholars' College with concentra- 



tions in scientific inquiry, both won 
the Student Research Awards. 

The award is given for more than 
research-the technique, organiza- 
tion, and originality were just as im- 
portant as what they researched. 

Both researched microbial bio- 
logical processes, but there research 
was sufficiently distinct from each 
other to win the award. 

The keynote speaker, Dr. Julie 
Kane, reminded the audience that 
research was more than just journals 
and articles. Her speech embodied 
the theme of Research Day — the 
Union of Information and Creativ- 
ity. 

"Scholars often forget that re- 
search isn't just scholarly articles," 
Kane said. 

"It's about the people behind it, 
and the creativity that makes each 
piece of research unique." 

She read her tribute to Robert 
Borsodi, "A Hobo's Crown," the 
man who hopped freight trains, 
opened coffee houses all over Amer- 
ica, and supported artists who drank 
at his establishments. 

Her poem required extensive re- 
search to relate his life story through 
poetry. She did the same with "A 
Tribute to Isabella," the story behind 
NSU's Theatre ghost. 

Both pieces demonstrated a meth- 
od different from what students of- 
ten use, one that combines individ- 
ual artistic ability with the aptitude 
for research. 



New system to register for classes 



J. C. Bryant 

Sauce Reporter 

new registration procedure 
called NSUConnect has 
been implemented at Northwestern 
State University as the only form of 
registration. 

From now on, students will be 
required to register for classes via 
the NSUConnect page. According 
to the procedure tab on the website, 
"The new NSUConnect system is 
designed so that only students can 
use the system to register, add, and/ 
or drop their classes." 

Faculty members no longer have 
the capability to register students 



for classes beginning with registra- 
tion for the upcoming Fall 2012 se- 
mester. 

This new system means that it's 
more important than ever that stu- 
dents play an active role in working 
with faculty advisors to make sure 
they're scheduled for the appropriate 
classes. Faculty can still play a role 
in helping students choose classes, 
but the responsibility for scheduling 
now falls strictly on the student. 

"I've been scheduling my own 
classes for the past few semesters, so 
it's not that big of a change," Mi- 
chael Nation said. Not all students 
are having an easy time with the new 
process, though. 



"I can't even get the website to 
load," Luke Teutsch said. 

Here are the steps for those who 
need to get to NSUConnect. Go to 
the NSU homepage at www.nsula. 
edu. Select "Web for Students Log- 
in" tab. Click on "NSU Connect" to 
register for the fall semester. 

Students can register, drop and 
add classes for fall 2012 any time 
through Aug. 28. However, all new 
registration that occurs between 
Aug. 20-28 is late registration and 
has an associated late fee. To avoid 
this fee, students are encouraged to 
register for at least one class prior to 
Aug. 20. 




SGA presidential runoff 



Tiffany Thomas 

Life Editor 

The recent 
presi- 
dential 
elections did not 
yield a new SGA 
president due to 
neither candidate j [[ ] 
receiving a simple 
majority, which 
is defined by the 
SGA election code 
as "50 percent of 
votes cast plus one 
vote." 

There will be a runoff election to- 
day starting at 12:01 a.m. and end- 
ing at 1 1 :59 p.m. to decide on the 



next president elect. Results will be 
posted April 5 at 8:30 a.m. 
The runoff election will occur be- 
tween Presi- 
dent/Vice 
President teams 
Derrick Hous- 
ton and Raven 
Maxile and 
Richard Sharp 
and Emily Cog- 
burn. 

Houston would 
like students 
to know that 
regardless of 
who they vote 
for, "NSU is still on the path to 
improvement." Houston and Maxile 
both pledge to remain members of 
the SGA and that "[they] are here 




to work for students because that is 
why [they] joined the SGA in the 
first place," Houston said. 
When asked what he would like 
to see the SGA improve upon, he 
added, "I want to see more public- 
ity for the SGA. Too many students 
don't know what the SGA is, what 
it does and how much its decisions 

affect them." 

Richard Sharp encourages candi- 
dates to take a close look at both 
candidates' experience on the SGA 
and what each has contributed to 
the SGA. 

"Our platforms are all very similar 
and students should look past that 
to see what each candidate has 
actually done," Sharp said. 



. «s4flHIRHHflHBflHHI 



Photo submitted by Ty Johnson 
Freshman scientific inquiry major views data from past NSSE annual reports. 

Northwestern benefits from NSSE survey 



Ty Johnson 

Practician Student 

The University Planning 
NSSE Committee urges 
freshman and seniors to 
make a difference by taking the 
NSSE survey. The deadline to com- 
plete the survey is only weeks away. 

University Planning and Assess- 
ment director Veronica Biscoe said 
NSSE is an acronym for National 
Survey of Student Engagement. 

"What the survey is really about 
is asking students about how en- 
gaged they are in their college expe- 
rience," Biscoe said. 

Biscoe said the survey asks about 
anything from how many papers stu- 
dents have written for class to how 



often they participate in extracur- 
ricular activities. 

"It's truly a survey," Biscoe said. 
"It's not an assessment of any type 
of skill." 

The NSSE survey is a web-based 
survey for college freshman and se- 
niors. According to the NSSE web- 
site, the surveys help institutions 
look at undergraduate experience, 
pinpoint aspects not in line with the 
mission (or what institutions ex- 
pect) and identifies weaknesses and 
strengths in the educational program. 

It also helps institutions know 
what areas to focus on to improv e 
student learning, experience and 
success. 

Biscoe said the university does 
not look at individual responses be- 



cause the data are reported in aggre- 
gate form with averages. 

"We have to give NSU student 
emails to the NSSE institute in In- 
diana," Biscoe said. "An invitation 
email will be sent to the students. 
We have to use the NSU email ac- 
count. 

That's why we've been pushing 
for students to check their email if 
they're a freshman or senior. That 
inv itation email has a link embedded 
in it. You would just click the link, 
and it would take you directly to the 
survey." 



Forrest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Index 



2 Life 

3 Opinions 

4 Sports 



Wednesday 

84769° 



Thursday 

86761° 



Friday 

85758° 



Saturday 

86761° 



Sunday 

88762° 



Monday 

83761° 



Tuesday 

81753° 





Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
tiffanythomas4@gmail. com 
April 4, 2012 



Kappa Alpha Psi set to host pageant 



i 



Ty Johnson 

Praclicitm Student 

Nine contestants will strut the 
runway in hopes of winning 
the Miss Krimson and 
Kream 2012 title and scholarship. 

The pageant's theme will be 
Kappa's Next Top Model. 
Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity will 
host the Miss Krimson and Kream 
2012 Pageant in the Student Union 
Ballroom on April 17. 

For S3, the fraternity will 
welcome attendees as early as 6:30 
p.m. The pageant will begin at 7 
p.m. 

A diverse panel of judges 
consisting of NSU faculty and staff 
will score the contestants in the 
categories of on-stage questions, 
swimvvear, talent and evening wear. 

The candidates will compete 
for the titles of Miss Krimson 
and Kream 2012, first and second 
runner-up. Best Talent, Most 
Ads Sold, Miss Congeniality and 
People's Choice. 

The eligibility requirements 
to compete in the pageant 
were attendance to the pageant 
informational, a minimum 2.5 
GPA and the availability to attend 
rehearsals. 

Brooks said 24 girls attended 
the informational. However, that 
number dwindled after preliminaries 
and rehearsals. There are now nine 
contestants competing for the Miss 
Krimson and Kream title. 

A special committee was 
established to orchestrate the 
event. The four-member pageant 



Ilii Tktli lambda (Chapter of Kappa Alpha »if Fraternity lr>c 
Present*-.. 




.maw 




committee pulled inspiration from 
NSU's Lady of the Bracelet pageant 
and other university pageants to use 
it as a blueprint to their program. 

They started planning it last fall. 

Pageant committee head and 
senior psychology major Patrick 
Brooks said the event will allow his 
fraternity to give back in a different 
way. 

• We decided to have the pageant 
and use it as an opportunity to give 
back to the young ladies of the NSU 
community that support Kappa 
Alpha Psi events," Brooks said. "In 
a sense, it's community service. 

We are awarding a scholarship 
to a young lady for her academic 
progress and outstanding leadership 
on campus." 

Brooks said the pageant was 
highly recommended by many 
students since last spring. 

"Several non-Greek young ladies 
were asking why we didn't have 
one," Brooks said. "I thought it 



would be a great thing to do." 

Junior accounting major Kenya 
Louis looks forward to seeing the 
choreography and evening gowns 
the most. 

"I decided to go to the pageant 
to support one of the contestants," 
Louis said. "I'm looking forward to 
seeing the dances that I heard about. 
I'm also excited to see the dresses." 

Sophomore secondary education 
major Janesa Richardson was 
chosen as the ch reographer for the 
pageant. 

Rici.irason said she modeled the 
choreography after the "smooth" 
moves of the members of Kappa 
Alpha Psi fraternity. 

She spends about five hours 
a week in rehearsal with the 
contestants. Those hours will 
increase as the date of the pageant 
approaches. 

"The girls are really excited," 
Richardson said. "Sometimes after 
practice they want to stay late and 



Event flyer by Brandon Blake 

keep going. They often lose track of 
time. They've been really eager to 
learn." 

Richardson juggles the task of 
serving as the choreographer and a 
dedicated assistant to Brooks. 

"She's been here every step of 
the way since day one," Brooks 
said. "She's doing an amazing job." 

The candidates are required to 
complete numerous community 
sen ice projects leading up to the 
pageant. 

"Kappa Alpha Psi isn't just 
about the fun aspect," Brooks said. 
"We're about community service as 
well. We wanted the girls to get a 
feel for that." 

Managing a large group and 
sticking to deadlines has been 
challenging, Brooks said. Despite 
a few obstacles, he believes the 

For rest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 




Jacob 
Labutka 

Fashion 
Columnist 



It's almost that time of year 
when the beach balls come 
out of the storage room and 
debauchery runs rampant. I write 
of no other event than the weeklong 
escape from academia that is spring 
break. 

Although not everyone will make 
it to the beach this season, wearing 
bright colors is encouraged in order 
to bring the season with you no 
matter your geography. 

But there are some of us whose 
spring break activities will be 
inspired by popular media like the 
spring breaks covered on MTV. And 
to those happy beachgoers I suggest 
purchasing a new beach towel and, 
more importantly, a bathing suit. 

In my opinion, women have the 
most experience shopping for 
bathing suits due to the varying 
styles and the decision to wear a one 
or two-piece. 

For some women who prefer the 
one-piece, there are some bathing 
suits that have the style of a two- 
piece in one beautifully wrapped 
package. They are sometimes 
referred to as monokinis (not to be 
mistaken for the original monokinis 
that were designed to leave the top 
uncovered). 

Generally, men do not have as 
many op'ions regarding the number 
of pic . ! of tneir swimsuits as 
women due to the surface areas each 
sex are socially required to cover. 
However, th>' options for men vary 
by the possible lengths of swim 
trunks. 



Have a stylish 
spring break 

There are of course the traditional 
knee and above-the-knee length 
swim trunks, which I do encourage 
you to own. However, there are 
some shorter swim trunks that 
are appropriate (and I don't mean 
Speedos in the instance of beach 
going). 

About six to eight inches in length, 
above-the knee trunks are best for 
showing off a physique that has 
tirelessly exercised at the gym to 
bulk up for springtime. Though 
depending on how comfortable you 
are, I would recommend these for 
smaller beach gatherings and wear 
the longer ones for more public 
beaches. 

I don't mean to embody a 
motherly role, but I must insist that 
all the beachgoers apply sunscreen 
before being delightfully pulsated 
with UV rays. However, there are a 
variety of tanning oils with SPF that 
accentuate your tan without skin 
burning or peeling. 

Many of us either hit the tanning 
beds or sprawl under the scorching 
sun to turn a few shades darker, 
but sometimes we need a little 
boost. Many choose to acquire a 
spray-on tan, which can be achieved 
from store brought products or 
by a professional. However, if 
done professionally, many of these 
spray-on tans will make you look 
drastically tanner for the first few 
days which should be kept in mind 
when deciding to have it done. 

Whatever your springtime plans, 
make it a point to look fabulous 
and have possibly scandalizing fun 
(or spend the week catching up on 
some much needed sleep). 




Spring 

Fling 

ast Wednesday the Student Activities Board hosted Spring Fling: 
* ^ "Laissez Les Bon Temps Rouler." The event featured a giant water 
slide, oxygen bar, recorded music and a live Zydeco band. 
SAB also provided over $7,000 worth of crawfish and jambalaya for the 
event to keep students' stomachs filled. 

To get the word out about Spring Fling, SAB used social media and was 
leased with the amount of students who attended. 
With a "spring 2012" stamped student ID, students were welcome to 
enjoy all of the festivities. 

The event was held at the NSU Pavilion which provided the free space 
students needed to roam around. 

Overall, SAB considers Spring Fling 2012 a success and wishes students 
a safe and happy spring break. 




SAB member Ryan Owens manned the DJ booth to provide students with music. 




Photo by Alexis Reliford (Current Sauce) 
Students (above) ride the slippery slope of the giant water slide and Jayna Moss (right) receives a 
scented breath of fresh air from the oxygen bar. 





Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 

April 4, 2012 



NSU enjoys 
variety for spring 
break 



Nick Russo 

Guest columnist 



North westm State's students 
will be among 1 .5 million 
students nationwide on 
spring break. A surv ey by www. 
collegian.com found that Cancun. 
Mexico, and Daytona Beach, Fla., 
are the most popular spring break 
destinations. 

NSU's spring break begins on 
Good Friday, but it is obvious that 
students are itching for it to begin 
already. 

While some students will travel 
for fun, some will continue working 
to help with college living expenses. 

"I'll be doing a lot of fishing, but 
also working at Maggio's to make 
money," Justin Warner, history 



NSU 

Speaks 



What are you 
doing for Spring 
Break 2012? ' 



"I 'm planning on visiting 
family and friends who I 
haven 't seen in a while. I m 
going to catch up on some 
sleep and get a headstart on 
all of my final works. " 



"I am going home and 
sleeping. Then. I'm go- 
ing to Arkansas to visit my 
girlfriends family. And then 
more sleeping. 



Rebecca Lefante 
sophomore, scientific in- 
quiry 



Kyle May 

senior, foreign language 



"I m going home and 
spending time with family 
and old friends. I also plan 
to relax as well as relieve 
stress through paintball 
and any other activities that 
include breaking unneeded 
plates and bottles. " 



Craig Flynn 

sophomore, music education 



"I 'm going to a national 
tournament for Demon 
Dodgeball in Saginaw 
Valley, Michigan. I m also 
going to be eating a lot of 
Indian food over the break. " 



Jebha Babu 
sophomore, pre-med 



major from Natchitoches, said. "I 
figure I would rather make money 
over the break than spend it." 

For those who are not staying 
in Natchitoches to work, spring 
break will be a valuable vacation 



opportunity for bonding with each 
other. One football player hopes to 
improv e the camaraderie with the 
squad during the time off. 

"I'm going to Perdido Key, 
Florida with my teammates to relax 



and chill on the beach," Brandon 
Monrose, accounting major from 
Lafayette, said. 

Several students have no choice 
but to stay in the Natchitoches 
area due to athletic obligations. 



A member of the Lady Demons 
softball team is dedicating her 
spring break to the team. 

"I'm staying in Natchitoches 
because we're in season and will be 
playing games during the week," 



Brooke Boeing, health and exercise 
science major, said. 

Classes are slated to start again 
Monday, April 9. 



We're 
all stars 
online: 

Spreading 
21st century 
news 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
editor 



If you have ever seen "Star 
Trek: The Original Series," or 
if you are an active supporter 
of the LBGOT community, there is 
a good chance you have heard of 
George Takei. 

Takei starred in "Star Trek" as 
Hikaru Sulu, one of the lieutenants 
of the USS Enterprise, but he has 
also taken center stage in recent 
years as he voices his opinions on 
the treatment of LBGQT rights in 
the United States. 

One of his major mediums is 
his Facebook page, on which he 
has almost 1,5 million likes. He 
communicates to his fans in a 
mostly humorous manner, but is not 
afraid to tell his audience what is on 
his mind. 



Fans seem to have embraced 
Takei's slogan "It's okay to be 
Takei!," where Takei is supposed to 
be a substitute for the word "gay." 
This is mostly supported on his blog 
named "That's so Takei!" 

Recently, his Broadway musical 
"Allegiance" has been funded 
through his network of supporters. 
This play will document the 
fictional story of two lovers in a 
Japanese Internment camp during 
WWII. 

Takei was four years old jij 
his family was sent to live at 
the Rowher Interment Camp in 
California, where they stayed from 
1942-1946. 

This experience obviously 
changed his life, as he is now 



imploring his friends and fans 
to donate to a cause he thinks is 
important to American history. 

The most important thing to 
take from this is that one person 
can make a big difference. It seems 
impossible to spread ideas so far, 
but it does not take a celebrity to 
change the world. 

As much as Takei is a skewed 
example. . he was already famous 
from his i as a helmsman in 

are rr ny men and 
women vmio .ire changing their 
worlds as we speak. 

Blogging and tweeting have 
become popular ways to spread 
messages or ideas as quickly as 
lightning. This has even changed 
the way governments behave. It 



takes one click to expose a scandal 
that would have stayed silent 20 
years ago. 

With social media, it is easy to 
be your own media outlet. Being 
famous is no longer required 
before you set out to sway people's 
opinions. This can be proven by the 
existence of terms such as "Twitter- 
famous," which apply to those 
people who get their start in the 
world by putting all they have into 
their social media outlets. 

If you have something 
interesting and unique to give to the 
world, it is almost certain that you 
will have an audience. Once you 
have an audience, there is nothing 
to stop you. 



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ACROSS 

1 Moist 

5 Lingerie 
item 

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12 Outside 

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15 1972 Bill 
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16 And olhers 

(Mt] 

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18 Blazing 
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insect 

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Lynoe 

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entry- levef 
job? 

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Gray's- 
creator 

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MMMfcM 
garb 

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in India 
34 Options list 
36 'Woe * me!" 

36 'Psycho" 
surname 

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surface 
feature 

40 Inmate 

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42 Pop song of 
1929 




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Writing tool 
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34 Oft-repeated 
chant 

36 U2 lead 

37 Applaud 

38 Puerto - 

39 Roundish 
hairstyle 

40 Superhero 
costume 
feature 

43 Ostrich's 
cousin 

44 Lubricate 

45 Close- 
moulNsd 

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squares 




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The 

Current 
sauce 

Jimmie Walker 



Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media 
Adviser 




Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 

Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 



Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com j 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 \ 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 

April 4, 2012 



Spring practice ends 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 



Senior safety Jamaal White breaks into the open field during a kickoff. He also scored a touchdown off of a fumble recovery. White is one of two returning safeties for the Purple Swarm Defense. 

Seniors eagerly await new season 



Malcolm Kirkendoll 

Sauce Reporter 

As spring practices end for the 
Demon football team, the se- 
niors are more determined 
than ever for this upcoming season. 

The Demons looked impressive 
during their last scrimmage game. 

The scrimmage lasted over two 
hours in smothering heat, but that 
didn't stop the team from focusing 
on much needed improvements. 

"We had a great day, with a lot 
accomplished in all three phases 
although we had to keep the live 
scrimmage to only about 60 plays," 
Bradley Dale Peveto, Demon head 
coach said about the last scrimmage. 
"We're much better schematically. 



We're tougher, executing, and we're 
growing up. It's the best the offense 
has looked in my four years here." 

For the next the six months the De- 
mons will be preparing for the 2012 
season. Coming off a 5-6 record last 
season, the Demons are improving, 
and the leadership of the seniors will 
be key for this improvement. 

Demon senior safety Jamaal 
White said that the vibe the seniors 
get about the upcoming season is a 
good one, and they are ready to fin- 
ish their tenure as Demon football 
players on the right foot. 

"We know what we need to do 
as seniors on the team," White said. 
"We have to lead by example for the 
young players on the team. For us 
these next 10 months will determine 



what w e w ill do for the rest of liv es." 

White had a 4-yard fumble return 
last Saturday in the Demons' scrim- 
mage. 

Returning starting quarterback 
Brad Henderson said he feels more 
comfortable, having already played 
a year under the Demons' system. 

"I'm very confident in what we 
have," Henderson said. With a lot of 
veterans coming back on both sides 
of the ball and performing better, I 
feel really good about this team." 

Henderson completed 1 6 out of 
28 passes for 1 99 yards. He also 
threw a 1 9-yard touchdown to Okla- 
homa transfer Sheldon McClain. 

The next time the Demons will 
be in in action is tomorrow at 6 p.m. 
for the Delaney Bowl in Turpin Sta- 



dium. 

With a high-octane performance 
from the offense and a solid defen- 
sive effort in last Saturday's scrim- 
mage, the Delaney Bowl should be 
exciting. 

The Delaney Bowl is the annual 
spring game when the offense plays 
against the defense. 

Some players use this game to 
earn spots in the team's lineup, while 
others players are more relaxed and 
use the game to sharpen their skills. 

"I definitely play more relaxed 
during spring scrimmages and 
games," Nic Russo, senior kicker 
and punter, said. "1 use these games 
to experiment and try out new ways 
to punt and kick better." 



2012 football schedule 


Texas Tech 




9/1/2012 


Ark.-Monticello 




9/8/2012 


Nevada 




9/15/2012 


Miss. Valley State 


w 


9/22/2012 


McNeese State 




9/29/2012 


Lamar 




10/6/2012 


Southeastern 




10/13/2012 


Nicholls 




10/27/2012 


Central Arkansas 




11/3/2012 


Sam Houston State 




11/10/2012 


Stephen F. Austin 




11/17/2012 


"bold font denotes home game* 





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Wednesday, April 18, 2012 ♦ Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 ♦ Volume 97: Issue 23 



KNWD the Demon back on air 



Ty Johnson 

Sauce Reporter 

NSU's radio station, KNWD, 
regained its signal with the 
purchase of a new device 
after several semesters of battling 
with equipment that kept calling it 
quits. 

Senior journalism major and 
KNWD general manager Brady Re- 
nard said it was hard to progress as 
a station w ithout a reliable transmit- 
ter. 

"Despite countless times we 
shipped it back to PTEK and they 
fixed it. It would come back and 
give a marginal effort before it failed 
again," Renard said. "We needed to 
get the transmitters replaced, and it 
just took a little bit for us to realize 
that. The transmitters had served 
their purpose." 

Located on top of the Turpin Sta- 
dium, the transmitter is the device 
that generates a radio frequency al- 
ternating current that aids an anten- 
na in radiating radio waves. Those 
radio waves are then broadcasted for 
the audience to tune in. Without it, 
the station isn't able to go on air. 

Renard said after doing research 
and consulting with a couple engi- 
neers, they decided that getting a 
new transmitter would be the best 
way to move forward. 

To buy a new transmitter, the 
station had to go through different 
appeals and file paperwork. Be- 
cause the new transmitter was un- 
der $5,0 8 0; the station bypassed -a 
lengthier process to purchase it. 
"We were able to simplify the pro- 
cess," Renard said. 

Renard contacted Energy-Onix 
CEO Bernie Wise and negotiated 
on the price of a digital transmitter. 
Renard said Wise cut a deal with 
KNWD since it was a university- 
based radio station. Energy-Onix 
is a New York-based transmitter 
manufacturer. 

"We got a 150-watt transmitter 
for a 100-watt price," Renard said. 
"It was a lot easier than what it nor- 
mally is to get something done be- 
cause of the graciousness of Bernie 
Wise at Energy-Onix," Renard said. 
Renard said due to factors such as 
paperwork and shipping, it took the 
new purchase three to four weeks to 
arrive. 

Renard is relieved for the sta- 
tion's replacement; however, he was 




Photo submitted by Ty Johnson 

Jessica Blow broadcasts her show to all of Natchitoches now that NSU has purchased a new transmitter for the on campus radio station, KNWD 91.7 the Demon. 



disappointed that he wasn't able to 
do everything he planned before 
graduating this May. 

"It's unfortunate," Renard said. 
"We had good participation. 1 was 
really confident in what we could 
do. I expanded the staff because I 
thought that was a step forward. But 
unfortunately with the signal being 
down, the station was not able to 
grow like I felt we could have." 

Renard said thankfully KNWD 
has a good staff that has continued 
working. 

Sophomore communications ma- 
jor Jessica Blow continued weekly 
reporting as if the transmitter was 
still up and running. 

"It's sad because this is my first 
semester with the radio," Blow said. 
"I wish I was able to broadcast the 



stories on air." 

Despite frequent problems with 
the signal, it did not take away from 
what she gained at KNWD. 

"Working for the KNWD is an 
experience that's opened my eyes," 
Blow said. "I've been to events that 
I wouldn't have gone to otherwise, 
and I met people that I probably 
w ouldn't have met if I wasn't report- 
ing for the radio." 

Blow said because her of the expe- 
riences she's gained at KNWD, she 
submitted an application to return 
in the fall. She's looking forward to 
working at the station with the un- 
likely threat of a broken transmitter. 

"I'm happy it's back because I get 
to hear my voice on air," Blow said. 
"Hopefully, I can continue working 
in the fall semester. It's exciting." 



Junior general studies major Tay- 
lor Furr agrees with Blow. 

"It's great that the signal is back," 
Furr said. "I didn't have as much to 
do at the station without it." 

As the KNWD public service 
announcer and public relations di- 
rector, he is in charge of reviewing 
various company promotions sent to 
the station and putting together ad- 
vertisements for KNWD. 

Furr is also the host of his own 
radio show. 

"I was hoping to bring my show 
back sooner but it's taking a little 
longer than expected to get it back 
on," Furr said. "I'm just going to 
wait until after summer classes. Es- 
sentially, I would only be able to do 
my show for a week because we're 
just getting the signal back." 



Furr said although the downtime 
gave him a chance to prepare play- 
lists for future shows, he's happy 
with the station's new purchase and 
intends on reaping the benefits of 
the new transmitter for semesters to 
come. 

"I plan to keep working here as 
long as I am student here at NSU." 
Furr said. "I feel like this is an or- 
ganization I can really contribute to. 
This is a good way to occupy my 
time. I don't do boring really well." 

With new equipment on board, 
general manager Brady Renard pre- 
dicts smooth sailing for the station. 
"Hopefully, we did the steps to make 
sure there is no downtime in the fu- 
ture," Renard said. "I hope that with 
this new transmitter, everything is 
going to be better." 



Liberal arts major Tara Luck 
was selected to serve as the 2012- 
2013 general manager. "I have full 
confidence in what she will do," Re- 
nard said. 

Renard encourages students take 
advantage of what KNWD has to of- 
fer. "You do a little work, you have 
a lot of fun and you make a decent 
amount of money," Renard said. 

"You get good experience too. I 
definitely encourage those who want 
to experience something different to 
give KNWD a try." 

A new digital transmitter is only 
the beginning of the station's im- 
provements. Renard predicts the sta- 
tion to be more stable, have better 
sound quality and newer interfaces. 
"Hopefully, you'll be seeing a new 
KNWD in the next few semesters." 



Prescott hopes for better relationship with students 



Jessica Blow 

Sauce Reporter 

While swimming at a bay in 
Texas City, Texas, a young 
Doug Prescott witnessed 
a close friend drowTi. The body was 
never recovered, but Prescott was 
impressed with the work that was 
put in to find his friend. After the 
incident, Prescott became a certified 
diver and instructor. 

The work left such an impres- 
sion on Prescott that he decided he 
w anted to become part of the police 
force. Before he became a detec- 
tive at NSU, he worked as a patrol 
deputy in Winn Parish. Currently 
Prescott has worked as a detective 
on the NSU campus for 23 years. 
"It's all I have ever done for about 



30 years." Prescott said. 

"Prescott's experience w ith inter- 
rogating and solving crimes helps us 
solve problems on NSU's campus," 
NSU police Chief Rickie Williams 
said. "You have to have experience 
to get people to talk to you because 
people aren't always w illing to talk." 

Willaims is proud Prescott is a 
part of the force. 

Prescott has chosen to stay at 
NSU because of the students. He 
w ants to see them succeed instead of 
being behind bars. 

Prescott said working with stu- 
dents is the best part of being a de- 
tective. Putting young people in jail 
is his least favorite. 

He is responsible for police re- 
ports, crime scene investigations 
and arrests. "There's a constant flow 



from the time I get in," Prescott said. 
Most of the campus problems are 
burglaries, drugs and alcohol. 

One of Prescott's most memo- 
rable incidents was in Winnfield. A 
man drove through the streets shoot- 
ing a gun. He injured five people and 
killed three. Prescott found out the 
man had mental health issues, and 
the subject was sent to a mental in- 
stitution. 

Another memorable incident hap- 
pened on NSU's campus. A student 
dropped his backpack on the floor 
in a classroom with students. In the 
bag was a loaded gun that went off 
when the bag hit the floor. No one 
was hurt. Later, Prescott found the 
student was involved in a drive-by 
shooting on Highway 1 1 7 where an 
older woman was shot. The student 



was arrested, but he had no motive 
Prescott said. 

To prevent such incidents form 
reoccurring, NSU's police force has 
taken great measures. They have in- 
creased officers, patrol vehicles and 
patrol methods. "There is more em- 
phasis on training," Prescott said. 

Vehicles have video and audio 
along with laptops. Gates surround 
every entry on campus, and they are 
open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. 

NSU police have a great relation- 
ship among each other, but Prescott 
wants the student and police rela- 
tionships to grow. He encourages 
students to come the staff if they 
have any questions or concerns. You 
can reach Prescott at his office num- 
ber, 3 1 8-357-543 1, or stop by his of- 
fice on campus at the police station. 




Secret Service not so secretly 
serviced: In Cartagena, Columbia 
several members of the president 
protection agency, the Secret Ser- 
vice, had the local police called on 
them for being disruptive and in- 
toxicated. The drunken men open- 
ly bragged about being part of the 
Secret Service and spent hundreds 
on alchohol and prositutes. 

Arizona still asks for I.D. during 
voting: On Tuesday, an appeals 
court allowed Arizona to maintain 
the right to require voters to show 



identification at the voting polls. 
The appeals court did state that 
the voters were not required to 
show proof of U.S. citizenship to 
vote in federal elections. 



Louisana attempts to ban sex 
offenders from Facebook: A 
bill that would ban sex offenders 
from certain social media web- 
sites such as Facebook reached 
a vote of 97- 1 in favor of the 
bill in the Louisiana House of 
Represenatives. The bill will 
now head to the Senate for vot- 
ing. A previous version of this 
bill was shot down for being too 
broad. The bill included things 
such as email and would have 
banned a sexual criminal from 
using almost every aspect of the 
internet. 



Index 


Wednesday 

82752° 


Thursday 

85761° 


Friday 

80760° 


Saturday 

69753° 


Sunday 

81755° 


Monday 

83756° 


Tuesday 

87760° 


2 Life 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 


















Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
tiffan\thomas4@gmail.com 
April 18, 2012 



Exchange student enjoys 
Louisiana culture 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Sauce Reporter 

n January, Soukaina Chihab 
boarded an airplane. She was 
scared — she had never been 
out of her native African country. 
America would be the first country 
she ever visited. Natchitoches and 
NSU would become her second 
home for one semester. 

The 21 -year-old Moroccan 
student majoring in management 
decided to improve her English 
and participate in the International 
Student Exchange Program (ISEP). 

"When I came here, I was 
thinking that 1 am in a movie," 
Chihab said. "Everything is 
different; it is not like Morocco at 
all. Even the way how you cross the 
street is different. People say 'hi' to 
you even if they don 't know you — it 
doesn't exist nowhere else." 

As the first student from the Al 
Akhawayn University (AUI) to 
participate in the exchange program 
at NSU, Chihab said NSU was one 
of her three choices in Louisiana 
along with LSU and Loyola 
University of New Orleans. 

NSU had an open slot, so she 
came for the spring semester. 

"I regret not doing a one-year 
exchange," Chihab, a junior, said. 

"I cannot change it now. You 
have to plan it before you go. I 
am leaving in May, and I will feel 
nostalgia when I leave. I am 2 1 , and 
this is the best experience of my 
life." 

Sixty students from Chihab's 
university are studying in America 
this semester. 

"We all went to a different place 
because if we would be together, 
we would communicate in our 





"Alice in Wonderland" cast members play in between rehearsals. 



Dance company to perform 'Alice in Wonderland' 



language and learn nothing," she 
said. "My friends are in Virginia, 
Arizona, California, New York and 
Washington, D.C. We all love it." 

Chibab is multilingual. She 
is French-educated, and she also 
speaks Arabic, English and Spanish. 
She said her peers at home do not 
speak enough English. But when 
they leave Morocco, English is the 
only language everybody knows. 

Chihab has met many people 
at NSU, but the first person she 
befriended was a Spanish exchange 
student, Ana Garcia, who showed 
her around the campus. 

"Ana and I went to New Orleans 
for Mardi Gras and it was so much 
fun," Chihab said. 



Soukaina Chihab 

When asked aboui her 
expc.ienve at NSU, Chihab smiled 
and said, "I like a lot that the 
campus is big in comparison with 
my university in Morocco. I like 
my dorm, the Columns, where I 
live. Professors are cool — I like 
them more than my professors in 
Morocco. The only problem here 
for me is transportation." 

If any NSU students would like 
to enjoy an experience similar to 
Chibab's, the International Student 
Exchange Program here on campus 



For rest of story: 
go to 

www.nsucurrentsauce.coin 



Angela Owusu-Duku 

Communications Student 

Don't be late to the dance 
production of "Alice in 
Wonderland" April 21-22 
at 7:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. in A. A. 
Fredericks Auditorium. 

Lewis Carroll's version of 
"Alice's Adventure in Wonderland 
and Through the Looking Glass" 
will feature the talent of the NSU 
Dance Company. 

Kirsten Reihl and Barry 
Stoneking, assistant professors of 
dance, worked collaboratively on 
this project. This production was 
designed to be suitable for children, 
although it was for the mature 
audience. 

"We wanted to involve the 
community." Stoneking said. "The 
story is all told .through dance." 
Both dance professors 

'««k | kbi 

choreographed numbers that are 



inspired by "Alice in Wonderland." 

"We wanted to work together," 
Reihl said. "We felt we had strong 
enough dancers in the NSU Dance 
Company that we could facilitate 
it." 

Lauren Bovia, a junior theatre 
major with a concentration in dance, 
plays the character Alice in the 
production. Bovia expressed how 
excited she was to get the dance 
audition. 

"Once I saw the cast list, I was 
thrilled to be Alice," Bovia said. 
"It has been a great experience 
and (lie hardest and most technical 
production I have ever been in, but 
the most exciting!" 

Dominique Terrell, a theatre 
major with a concentration in dance 
performance and directing, is one of 
the puppeteers in the production. 

"I help with the special effects," 
Terrell said. 

As the production debut 



approaches, there is a higher 
demand for participants to practice 
until each part is perfected. They 
have prepared for this production 
since the beginning of the school 
year. 

"The closer we get, the longer 
our rehearsals are and the more 
work it is," Terrell said. "Now is the 
time to dig deep." 

The costume and set design 
play a major role in the "Alice in 
Wonderland" production. Theatre 
students helped in creating the 
designs. 

James McNeil, a senior theatre 
major, is a props and head puppet 
designer for the production. 

"I enjoy the mechanics of 
puppetry and to be able to give life 
to something inanimate," McNeil 
said. "I'm an artist at heart." 

Approximately 40 students will 
be featured in this production along 
with children who auditioned. 



Inspirations 
from a spring 
break adventure 

Spring break was the week 
everyone had been waiting 
for, and this year I chose 
to spend mine with my friends 
in Pensacola, Fla. There the air 
is breezy and doesn't make you 
sweat profusely when you attempt 
to lie out to work on your summer 
tan. Amidst the people and stores 
I was quite observant of what was 
the most fabulous and what was 
certainly not. 

It seemed that on many days I 
was surrounded by polka dots and 
w as quite pleased with what they 
were on. A short blue dress with 
white polka dots and a white bikini 
with black polka dots (and vice 
versa) were my favorite uses of the 
pattern. 

Speaking of bathing suits, 




Jacob 
Labutka 

Fashion 
Columnist 



there were a lot of cute ones out 
on those sandy beaches (as well 
as nice physiques wearing them). 
However, my belief that everyone 
should be aware of their body type 
before purchasing their bathing 
suits (and clothing at that) was 
reinforced. 

There was also a lot of blue 
worn and bought during this week. 
Different shades of blue such as 
teal, sky, navy and aqua were just 
a few hues that my friends and I 
fashionably showcased through the 
streets of Pensacola. 

Spring break has also reminded 



RSO Spotlight: Lambda spreads awareness about LBGT community 



Jacob Labutka 

Staff Reporter 



For rest of story: 
go to 

www. n sue u rrentsauce.com 



( ^ t-ou guys have a great 
Y opportunity to help out 
the LGBT community 
around campus," SGA senator, 
Richard Sharp, said about Lambda. 

Lambda is a social organization 
that discusses and promotes 
LGBTQ awareness. They welcome 
anyone of any sexual orientation or 
gender identity to come and discuss 
important issues. 

The group was founded in the 
1 980s but soon after it became 
dormant until it reestablished a 
presence on campus in 2007. 

The group was named "Lambda" 
because the Greek letter was 
selected by the International Rights 



Congress as the gay and lesbian 
rights symbol in 1974. 

Lambda engages in various 
activities both on and off 
campus. They proudly attended 
the Louisiana Academic Queer 
Conference (LAQC) that was 
initiated by LSU in 2011. 

"Lambda has been involved 
in outreach programs that aim to 
help LGBT youth in accepting and 
embracing their sexual identities," 
Desiree Hatten. a sophomore 
member, said. "We try to use our 
owti experiences in helping them 
achieve these goals." 

Activism for the LGBT 
community is performed through 
varying events such as their 
protestation of Proposition 8 in 
Shreveport. Members are also 



encouraged to participate in 
National Coming Out Day and 
National Day of Silence. 

In courtesy of the Trevor Project, 
Lambda is looking to host an 
awareness day to promote LGBT 
suicide prevention. They also want 
to participate in the "It Gets Better" 
video project. 

They have held a variety of 
fundraisers including raffling off 
items such as the naughty and nice 
Valentine's Day baskets. 

Lambda welcomes new members 
to join throughout the year. As 
a social organization, Lambda 
organizes social events for members 
and events in which non-members 
are welcome to attend. 

This year will mark the second 
year that Lambda has hosted their 



Big Queer Prom. This year's prom 
will take place on April 20 in the 
Student Union Alley at 7:00 p.m., 
and everyone is invited to come. 

"Overall, Lambda is about 
creating a safe environment for 
every one," Doolan said. "It's a 
social RSO that allows people to be 
themselves and blossom in a safe, 
welcome environment." 

Lambda has an open door policy 
for anyone who feels that he or 
she needs someone to talk to. The 
organization discourages negativity 
from the outside as well as inside 
the organization. 

Meeting times and locations 
for the fall 2012 semester Lamba 
meetings will be announced next 
semester. 



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Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
April 18, 2012 



Rants: The Olympics 




Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



As you all may have been 
aware, the Olympics are to 
be held this year in London. 
As this discourse is being typed, 
athletes are training hard, and the 
east end of London gets a much 
needed face lift. 

Most of the usual sports will 
be included in the 2012 Summer 
Olympics. Yet, there are a few that 
raise my eyebrows. Allow me to 
explain. 



The sport that I think does not 
belong on the Olympics level is 
table tennis. Table tennis, or ping- 
pong, is a parlour game. Ev ery man 
cave and teen hangout will have a 
ping-pong table w edged into a dark 
corner. While I have only been in 
a few, I assume some Greek houses 
on university campuses have them 
also. 

It just does not seem like a 
daunting task to win at a game of 
table tennis, especially since most 
games are won for soft drinks, 
adult bev erages, money or phone 
numbers. Winning an Olympic 
ping-pong match is comparable 
to receiving a Nobel Prize for yo- 
yoing or Pig Latin. 



The other ordeal with table 
tennis is that this year's Olympics 
also include regular and more 
athletic forms of tennis. It is beyond 
me the reason behind having two 
versions of this event. 

Another issue I have is with 
horseback riding. There really is not 
much to be said on this one, except 
that it seems more like a sport for 
the horse than it does the person 
riding the horse. No doubt skill is 
needed in controlling a splendid 
beast, but the real athlete seems to 
be the horse. 

On the whole, however, I am 
quite alright with the Olympics. I 
do in fact think that it is a rather 
healthy for nations to compete. The 



Olympics are a truly a global agora 
for the world's community, well, at 
least the sporting community. 

Unfortunately, world disputes 
will never be solved with sports, but 
at least it can keep our minds off 
of whose secret service slept with 
said prostitutes and the misdeeds of 
some anti-multicultural in Norway 
or wherever. 

I have no real preference for the 
Winter or Summer Olympic Games. 

Just the very fact of 1 53 nations 
coming together in a peaceful way 
and leaving in the same manner is 
a confident achievement worthy or 
praise, even if that peaceful way 
is table tennis (or curling, for that 
matter. 



We need writers! 

Our newspaper 
needs stories writ- 
ten by students. 
Come by our office, 
227 Kyser, if you 
would like to join. 

Meetings every 
Monday at 6 p.m. 
We hope to hear 
from you! j 

- Current Sauce 
staff 



Super Crossword 



SELF- 
POSSESSED 



ACROSS 
1 Myron 
Floren's 
boss 
5 Malcolm — 
Warner 
10 Priam's 
kingdom 
14 Daddy duck 

1 9 Adams or 
Sedgwick 

20 Napoleon's 
fate 

21 Something 
to skip? 

22 De Valera 
ot Ireland 

23 Start of a 
remark by 
Dan Post 

26 Rectify 

27 Sprinted 

28 Part of a 
suit 

29 Pastoral 
poem 

30 Sherbet 
flavor 

31 Norm 

32 Rib — 

34 One of 
Them!" 

35 Dirty 

37 Part 2 of 
remark 

45 Colleague 
of Dolly and 
Loretta 

46 Mature 

47 Peachy- 
keen 

48 Plumb crazy 

49 "Maria — " 
('41 song) 



51 College 
growth 

52 Before, to 
Byron 

53 Mendicant 
monk 

54 Utter 
56 See 90 

Across 
59 Dispute 

61 Pigment 

62 Mibachi 
residue 

63 Oaf 

65 "Love — 
the Ruins" 
('75 film) 

66 Part 3 of 
remark 

69 "I Got a 
Name- 
singer 

73 Add info 

74 Mil. group 
76 Genesis 

vessel 
79 "Little — " 
('64 hit) 

81 "Be my 
guest!" 

82 God with a 
trident 

84 Storms 

85 — Dinh 
Diem 

87 Paw part 

88 Jergehs or 
' Astaire 

89 Field of 
Knowledge 

90 With 56 
Across, 
common 
appetizer 



92 Chimney 


4 Beer barrel 


39 


Born 


82 Hogan or 


part 


5 Baseball's 


40 


You'll get a 


Hindemith 


93 Duel tool 


Derek 




kick out of it 


83 Perfect 


94 Part 4 of 


6 Shaft 


41 


Texas 


86 Word with 


remark 


7 Freshen a 




landmark 


baby or 


97 Domino or 


fuchsia 


42 


Symbol 


snake 


Waller 


8 Cover girl 


43 


Buttercream, 


87 Horner's 


98 Herriot title 


Carol 




e.g. 


fruit 


start 


9 Kapaa 


44 


Laramie or 


90 Sensed 


99 "Excuse 


keepsake 




Sumter 


91 New Jersey 


me" 


10 Auto 


45 


Devour 


town 


100 Western st. 


transaction 




Dostoevsky 


92 Adversary 


101 Mugabe of 


11 Actress 


50 


— carte 


95 One who 


Zimbabwe 


Schneider 


53 


"Fee, Fi, 


no's best? 


105 Whetstone 


12 Fall 




Fo, — . . ." 


96 "What a 


107 Out of 


birthstone 


55 


Leading 


relied" 


control 


13 Craving 




man? 


97 Charlatan 


109 She's a 


14 Lack 


56 


Container 


100 Uncool 


sheep date 


15 " — Lama 


57 


Arm bones 


101 Hard to find 


112 Venerate 


Ding Dong" 


58 


Annie of 


102 Miasma 


113 End of 


('61 tune) 




"Designing 
Women" 


103 Portend 


remark 


16 Prayer 




104 Rohmer or 


117 "The Kiss" 


finale 


60 


Jets and 


Carmen 


sculptor 


17 Hong — 




Sharks 


105 Sign of 


118 One of the 


18 The 


63 


Opening 


sanctity 
106 "Glad All— " 


Waughs 


NeverEnding 


64 


UK honor 


119 "East of 


Story" author 


67 


Delayed 


£64 hit) 
107 Carpenter's 


Eden" 


24 — Office 


68 


Worn down 


director 


25 Regret 


69 


Cugat 


tool 


120 Imminent 


audibly 




consort 


108 Knight's 


121 Upright 


30 In the know 


70 


Mississippi 


quaff 


122 Michael of 


31 Nero's 




or Missouri 


109 Kind of 


"Cabaret" 


instrument 


71 


New York 


pitcher 


123 Unkempt 
124"Vissi d'— " 


32 Duplicate 




city 


110 "Huh?" 


33 Savored the 


7? 


Bk. 


111 Bronte hero- 


(Tosca" 


seitan 




offerings 


ine 


aria) 


34 Fall flower 


75 


It's in the 


113 Horse 




35 David of 




bag 


hash 


DOWN 


"Dark 


76 


Skilled 


114 Endorses 


1 Sport 


Shadows" 


77 


Romeo and 


115 Duncan's 


2 O'Brien or 


36 Too tubby 




Juliet 


denial 


Skinner 


37 Twist and 


78 


Banjo locale 116 "Jurassic 


3 Mortgage, 


turn 


79 


Grouch 


Park" 


e.g. 


38 Bee flat? 


80 


Register 


stuff 



1 


2 


3 




19 








23 








27 








Super 
Crossword 
Answer 
Key 




The 

CurrentSauce 


Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 


Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 
Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 


Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 


Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 




Alexis Re li ford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 


Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 




Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 


Jacob Labutka Contact us at: 
Fashion Columnist www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 


Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 




Trivid 

tCSt byfifi | 

Rodriguez 



1. LANGUAGE: What is the mean- 
ing of the Latin phrase "novus ordo 
seclorum," located on the Great Seal 
on a U.S. $1 bill? 

2. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: 
What is the name for a seashell collec- 
tor or expert? 

3. ART: What Mexican muralist 
was married to Mexican painter Frida 
Kahlo? 

4. COMICS: What was the name of 
Casper the Friendly Ghost's horse? 

5. SPORTS: Where did the sport of 
jai alai originate? 

6. GEOGRAPHY: Where is Death 
Valley located? 

7. TELEVISION: Which PBS doc- 
umentary series featured the song 
"Ashokan Farewell" as its theme 
music? 

8. MEDICINE: What is the brand 
name for the sedative diazepam? 

9. LITERATURE: Who was the first 
to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature 
(1901)? 

10. ENTERTAINERS: What was the 
stage name of the actor w ho was born 
"Laszlo Lowenstein"? 

Answers 

1 . A new order of the ages 

2. Conchologist 

3. Diego Rivera 

4. Nightmare 

5. Spain's Basque region 

6. Southern California 

7. "The Civil War" by Ken Bums 

8. Valium 

9. French poet Sully Prudhomme 

10. Peter Lorre 

O 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. 




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Unscramble these twelve letter strings to form each into an ordinary word 
(ex HAGNEC becomes CHANGE ). Prepare to use only ONE word from 
any narked ( V ) letter string as each unscrambles into more than one 
word (ex V RATHE becomes HATER or EARTH or HEART ). Fit each 
string's word either across or down to knot all twelve strings together. 





Love in 
a time of 
college 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
editor 



When I hear about people 
getting married and 
having children as 
undergraduates, I cringe. I know 
quite a few people from my high 
school that are already married and 
settled down, and that frightens me. 

Imagine it! The words "settled 
down" summon images of less sleep 
than 1 want and more spending than 
1 can afford. "Settling down" is 
what happens when I'm 30-years- 
old and getting tired of floating 
around the world on a whim. 

But this is no longer the case - 
"settled down" now refers to some 
friends from high school and a 
growing number of Northwestern 's 
student population. 

I am not knocking marriage or 
long-term relationships. I believe 
that if you and your partner truly 
care about each other, you can 
stay at the dating stage for a while. 
That way, if anything falls through, 
you don't have to go through the 
horrible experience of a divorce. 

On the other hand, if two people 
do stay together until they are 
established in their chosen careers, 
they could be much better off. They 
will be financially secure, and they 
will have experienced ALL that life 
has to offer someone before they 
"settle down." 

I understand that if you love 
someone at this age, you think your 
relationship will last forever. Your 
relationship may last maybe three to 
five years, but sadly the chances are 
that it won't last that long. 

Why? Because you're still 
changing and establishing your 
beliefs and opinions. You and your 
significant other will differ in your 
preference of locations, types of 
houses and even the number of 
children. Some of your plans for 
the future are bound to clash, and 
one or both parties may settle for 
something they don't truly want. 

So, if you're thinking of 
marriage with your significant other, 
just hold back for a while. Stay with 
them and enjoy your time as young 
adults because it won't last forever. 
Then, w henever you are ready to 
move on, you'll have the experience 
with your partner as a separate 
person before trying marriage on 
for size. 

Just remember that college is a 
time to test yourself and to become 
that adult that you truly want to be. 
Although not impossible, it is much 
more difficult to achieve that goal 
when you are tied to another person 
and responsible for more than you 
should be at your age. 





The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at 

www.thecurrentsauce.com -v- , # * 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 

April 18, 2012 



Lady Demons split series with UTA 



Robbie Kleinmuntz 

Sauce Reporter 

A couple of miscues in the field 
by the Northwestern State 
softball team led to a walk- 
off grand slam by Texas-Arlington's 
Hillary Steed to take the contest 6-2 
in the bottom of the ninth inning on 
Friday at Allan Saxe Field. 

The frame started when UTA's 
Kelsey Kaiser hit a ground ball to the 
pitcher that was dropped by the first 
baseman. With one out, Stephanie 
Gonzalez reached on an error by the 
third baseman, putting runners on 
second and third. After a walk and a 
fielder's choice groundout at home 
plate, Steed hit the big two-out bomb 
to end the game. 

The Lady Demons (16-24, 4-9 
SLC) outhit the Mavs (13-18, 3-6 
SLC) 6-5, but made four errors on 
defense. Teri Lyles (7-9) pitched 
all nine innings for the Mavs to earn 
the win, while Brooke Boening (4-5) 
took the loss even though she didn't 
give up an earned run. 

Kylie Roos started for NSU and 
allowed just one earned run in four 
innings, and Sara Aasness tossed two 
shutout innings of relief. The Lady 
Demons trailed 2-1 in the top of the 
sixth inning when Roos led it off 
with her second homer of the year to 
tie the game. 

NSU scored the first run of the 
game in the fourth frame on a RBI 
single by Cali Burke. The hit scored 
Shenequia Abby who had come in to 
pitch-run for Roos after she walked 
earlier in the inning. 

Tara McKenney tallied her 15th 
multi-hit game of the year by finish- 
ing two-for-four with a pair of sin- 
gles. Samantha Roberts extended her 
hitting streak to nine games with an 
infield single in the fourth inning. 



: 





Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 



k 

mm - mBHBL 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 

Outfielder Jordan Palmer makes contact with the ball. UTA beat NSU the first game 6-2, but the Lady Demons shut them out 2-0 the next game to 
split the series. 

Things were different for NSU the 
next game 

Making her first start of the 
season, sophomore Sara Aasness 
pitched lights-out as the Northwest- 
ern State softball team topped Tex- 
as-Arlington, 2-0 on a home run by 
Brianna Rodriguez Saturday at Allan 
Saxe Field. Aasness ( 1-1 ) threw 5.2 
scoreless innings to pick up the win 
for NSU (17-24, 5-9 SLC). 

Brooke Boening came in and 
tossed 1.1 shutout frames of relief 
against the Mavs (13-19, 3-7 SLC) 
and earned her second save of the 
season. It was the fourth shutout 



in the last five games for the Lady 
Demons, who have let up just one 
earned run in the last 36 innings. 

At the plate, Rodriguez prov ided 
all the offense NSU would need with 
a two-run homer in the second in- 
ning. 

The frame started when Samantha 
Roberts drew a walk, and Rodriguez 
powered a no-out homer to leftfield. 
Rodriguez also singled to rightfield 
in the sixth inning to record her sixth 
multi-hit game of the year. 

The Lady Demons turned their 
first triple-play of the season in the 
first inning, 6-3-2-5-3-3. With run- 



ners on first and third, UTA's Hillary 
Steed grounded out to shortstop. 

First baseman Rodriguez stepped 
on the bag and threw to home-plate 
to try and stop Courtney Zink, who 
originally hesitated, from scoring. 

As the ball beat Zink to the dish, 
she held up and was caught in a pick- 
le. Stephanie Gonzalez, who started 
the at-bat as the runner on first, ad- 
vanced all the way to third as NSU 
was tossing the ball back and forth 
to try to get the runner out in the run- 
down. 

When Zink retreated back to third, 
Gonzalez was already occupying the 



bag - as both runners were standing 
on third, Rodriguez tagged Zink and 
she was called out. 

Gonzalez thought the umpire 
called her out, stepped off the bag 
and was also tagged out. Callie Col- 
lins (6-10) took the loss for UTA 
after striking out five batters in 4.2 
innings. 

She surrendered two runs on two 
hits and a pair of walks. Teri Lyles 
threw 2.1 innings of relief and al- 
lowed just one hit. NSU will be 
back in action on Friday when the 
team travels to Nicholls a confer- 
ence weekend series. 



Dynomite: ballin' 
out of control 

Having money to blow has be- 
come more of a literal phrase 
in the sports world recently. 
It's increasingly alarming to find 
out about more ex professional ath- 
letes losing all their money shortly 
after retiring. 

Some of these athletes have ac- 
quired millions of dollars throughout 
their careers and nothing to show for 
it after they hang up their cleats or 
Air Jordans. 

It's perplexing when you think 
about it. Many of them grew up in 
tough environments. They vowed to 
put their parents in a big house and 
get their loved ones out of bad living 
arrangements. 

They excelled in their sport to es- 
cape that lifestyle only to take a path 
that could lead them back to that 
situation. Something is glaringly 
wrong with this picture, but athletes 
turn a blind eye to the possible pre- 
dicament. Through their rise to for- 
tune and fame they never learn how 
to manage money, a life skill some 
never acquire. 

These individuals don't have life 
skills that help them manage their 
riches. They become easy targets for 
money-hungry friends and mislead- 
ing financial advice. 

According to Sports Illustrated, 
78 percent of athletes file for bank- 
ruptcy within two years of retire- 



For rest of story: 
go to 

w w w.n s u c u r r en tsa u ce.co m 



Demon tennis knows no borders 



Alyssa Richardson 

Sauce Reporter 

The Czech Republic to 
Louisiana may be more than 
5,000 miles away, but a love 
for tennis and traveling prompted 
Andrea Nedorostova to leave her 
hometown of Czech to attend 
NSU. 

Nedorostova, a junior mass 
communications major, was 
recruited for the NSU tennis team. 
Inspired by her father, she has been 
playing tennis since she was six- 
years-old. 

During her first tennis practice 
she was told by her coach that she 
couldn't play because she was too 
small. 

Nedorostova insisted she 
practice, so the coach found a small 
racket so she could play. 

"I like that I have become so 
independent, and I like having 
roommates, but I miss home a lot," 
Nedorostova said. "I really miss my 
family." 

Born in the Czech Republic, 
Nedorostova didn't speak much 
English. Though she was taught 
some English in school, after a 
certain grade the teaching stopped. 

Nedorostova didn't believe the 
class prepared her enough so she 
made the decision to teach herself. 

She devoted her personal time to 
learning English to prepare her for 
her stay in the U.S. 

"'Andrea is very unselfish, a 
team player and does what it takes 
for our team to be the best they 
can be," Dubois said. "She utilizes 
her strengths, minimizes her 
weaknesses and improves on both 
to make her a complete player." 

Coach Patrick Dubois described 
her as "a very hard worker who has 
improv ed each year." 

Nedorostova was recruited 
through an online agency in Czech 
that finds scholarships in America 
for all types of athletes. There were 
many schools to choose from but 
when she heard NSU was located 
in a city with a warm climate, had 
a Division 1 tennis team and that 



X / 






Submitted Photo 

Kaitlyn Brooks sets the ball for a teammate to spike. She will join the Lady Demons next season. 

NSU adds standout setter Kaitlyn Brooks 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Andrea Nedorostova prepares to return the ball during a rally. 



the other players were really nice 
Nedorostova made her decision to 
attend NSU. 

A video was uploaded on the 
Internet of her playing tennis and 
was viewed by coaches all over the 
world. 

"I'm very proud to represent 
NSU because the people support us 
so much," Nedorostova said. "I've 
never felt out of place; the only 
difference is my accent." 

Nedorostova said tennis is 
different in her home country 
because she had to leam to play 
for an entire team, rather than just 
herself. In Czech Republic she 
played for a tennis club. 

She stated there are tennis teams 
you can play for whoever you 
wanted, at any time; it was your 
choice. 



Coach Debois explained that 
the team focuses on the process 
of proper technique, conditioning, 
fundamentals, teamwork, 
communication and positive body 
language to position and be a top 
team in the Southland Conference. 

Nedorostova isn't interested in 
playing professional tennis; she 
only plays for fun. 

She plans to pursue a job within 
her major, but would be interested 
in coaching a tennis team in her 
spare time. 

"Andrea is a very positive person 
who brings out the best in herself 
and her teammates. She has done 
an outstanding job in her first three 
years as a Lady Demon on and off 
the court," Coach Dubois said. 



Courtesy of Sports Info: 

The Northwestern State vol- 
leyball team completed its 
2012 recruiting class with the 
signing of standout setter Kaitlyn 
Brooks, the program announced 
last Wednesday. 

Brooks (5-7), a native of Sug- 
arland. Texas, joins middle-blockers 
Amanda Kunz and Glynna Johnson 
as newcomers for the 2012 season. 
Brooks will add the much-needed 
depth the Lady Demons have looked 
for at the setter position alongside 
Emily Sweet. 

"Adding Kaitlyn to our 2012 re- 
cruiting class completes our roster. 
After a very strong 2011 class, it 
was important that we added size 



in the middle and another setter 
that can distribute the ball at a high 
level," said co-head coach Hugh 
Hemesman. 

"Kaitlyn is an extremely talented 
player and is the perfect fit for our 
program. She plays the game with 
a ton of energy and is an all-around 
great competitor." 

In addition to guiding Ft. Bend 
Austin High School to a pair of play- 
off appearances in 2010 and 2012, 
Brooks led her school to three con- 
secutive top-3 district finishes. 

She has a long list of individual ac- 
colades that include 2011 and 2010 
District 25-5A Most Valuable Setter, 
201 1 Team MVP, Memorial Herman 
Houston Area Athlete of the Week 
(Nov. 9, 2011), Houston Chronicle 
Girl Athlete of the Week (Oct. 30, 



2011), 2009 First-Team All-District 
and 2008 team's Most Inspirational. 

"On top of being a very talented 
setter, Kaitlyn is equally talented as 
a defensive player and has the abil- 
ity to become a collegiate libera. She 
is extremely quick and her versatil- 
ity gives us a host of options for our 
team," Hemesman said. 

Brooks plays club ball with 
Houston Skyline Juniors. The team 
is scheduled to play in the Lonestar 
Classic National Qualifier on April 
20-22. 

"It was very clear on her visit 
that Kaitlyn and her family are going 
to fit right into our program. She de- 
veloped an instant bond with a team 
that already has great chemistry," 
Hemesman said. 





! 



• 




Northwestern State University 




Wednesday, April 25, 2012 » Natchitoches, Louisiana 



www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



Student Newspaper of NSU since 1914 • Volume 97: Issue 24 



Houston sworn in with new cabinet 



Memrie Gibbons 

Sauce Reporter 

NSU's Student Government 
Association welcomed 
junior social work major 
Derrick Houston as the new student 
body president. Monday night in 
the President's Room of the Fried- 
man Student Union. Houston was 
administered the oath of office by 
the Dean of Students, Dr. Chris 
Maggio. 

Houston expressed his gratitude 
for the student body's support and 
his expectations for the upcoming 
year. 

"First of all, it feels great to have 
been elected and for all of the stress 
and chaos of elections to be over 
with," Houston said. 

"I'd like to thank everyone for 
their support for my campaign; it's 
truly been overwhelming to see 
such strong backing from the stu- 
dent body. I have very high expecta- 
tions for the coming year. 

So much has been done to im- 
prove the campus during President 
Luck's year and it is my hope that 



my cabinet and I will be able to not 
only continue those improvements 
but also institute plenty of new ones 
as well." 

After being sworn in as the SGA 
president for the 2012-2013 school 
year, Houston administered the 
oath of office to new vice-president 
Raven Maxile. 

Maxille thanked the student 
body for their support and stated 
SGA's effort to continue in an ef- 
fective manner. 

"I just want to say thank you to 
everyone in the student body for 
their support during the race and 
having faith in us," Maxile, ajunior 
mass communications major, said. 

"We are going to do our best to 
fill some very large shoes that are 
being left to us." 

Houston then appointed his cabi- 
net. The senators for assembly then 
voted on and approved the cabinet 
for the 2012-2013 school year. 

The cabinet for next year con- 
sists of: speaker of the senate, Me- 
gan McDaniels; chief of staff, Ellie 
Spain; administrative assistant, 
Ashley Haynes; financial director, 



Richard Chenvert; communications 
director, Emily Cogburn. 

Houston's cabinet contains a 
wide variety of student representa- 
tion that has the capacity for great 
potential and features Ellie Spain 
and Emily Cogburn, who were run- 
ning against Houston in the presi- 
dential election. 

However, just as the new vice 
president. Raven Maxille stated, the 
new cabinet "has some rather large 
shoes to fill." 

President Luck and her cabinet 
accomplished numerous goals in 
order to better the campus in an 
astounding manner. 

Houston and his cabinet mem- 
bers must familiarize themselves 
with the new constitution being 
implemented next year. This new 
constitution was written by the 
former speaker of the senate, Zech 
Jones, a senior in the Louisiana 
Scholars' College. 

In attendance at the inauguration 
was former president Tara Luck, 
who gave a speech that commended 
the SGA on their long and impres- 
sive list of accomplishments. 




Photos submitted by Memrie Gibbons 
Photo above: NSU SGA president Houston with his new cabinet. Photo below: Chris Maggio swears in Houston. 



Some of these accomplish- 
ments included improvement in 
campus security, attempts to get a 
new student union, the transition to 
Orgsync and the implementation of 
a new constitution. 

Luck was followed by the mem- 
bers of her cabinet, who each left 
the SGA with words of encourage- 
ment for the upcoming year. 





Photo submitted by : News Bureau 
Dr. Jack Wann, center, teaches a three week class on Shakespearean acting to CAPA students. 

Loft Theatre named for Dr. Wann 



Courtesy of News Bureau 

Northwestern State University 
has named its Loft Theatre 
in honor of former artistic 
director Dr. Jack Wann. 

Wann was a member of North- 
western State's faculty from 1990 
until 2003. building one of the top 
undergraduate theatre programs in 
the South. Under Wann, Northwest- 
ern gained accreditation from the 
National Association of Schools of 
Theatre. 

More than 40 of his students 
worked in summer stock companies 
each year and a number of his former 
students are working professionally. 

"It would be safe to say that the 
NSU Theatre and Dance program 
would not be nearly as success- 
ful today if it hadn't been for Dr. 
Wann's guidance." said Coordinator 
of Theatre and Dance Scott Burrell. 



"Even today, the program's mission 
remains the same as it did when Dr. 
Wann rekindled the program in the 
90s. A strong commitment to college 
academic work combined with prac- 
tical training to support students into 
their entrance into the professional 
theatre/dance world." 

Wann established the NSU Sum- 
mer Theatre. He also regularly 
brought working theatre profession- 
als to Natchitoches to hold work- 
shops for students. 

In 2002. he published a book, 
Shakesperience!: An Approach to 
Performing Shakespeare, and re- 
ceived the Mildred Hart Bailey Re- 
search Award from Northwestern 
State. 

Wann was named professor 
emeritus after his retirement. He has 
maintained his close ties with North- 
western State by directing summer 
theatre productions and returning 
to campus annually to teach theatre 



classes. 

Wann taught a three-week class 
on Shakespearean acting at NSU this 
semester which concluded in early 
April. 

"The name of Dr. Jack Wann 
is closely identified with the theatre 
program at Northwestern State. He 
led the reinstatement of the program 
and developed faculty and students 
to high levels of achievement in the- 
atre," said Northwestern State Presi- 
dent Dr. Randall J. Webb. 

"He has shown great loyalty to 
Northwestern State and its students 
by returning each year to share his 
knowledge. Jack remains a beloved 
figure within the university and 
Natchitoches communities." 

The Jack Wann Theatre is on the 
second floor of the A.A. Fredericks 
Center for Creative and Performing 
Arts and is being renovated to create 
a state of the art acting and move- 
ment laboratory theatre. 



International food festival held by NSU students 




Photo submitted by: Jarred Roberts 
NSU students present exotic foods to the public. 

Courtesy of News Bureau 

A few hundred people attended International Festival of Cultures and Cuisines Tuesday, April 24th. The 
event took place in the 500 block of Front Street in downtown Natchitoches from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.. 
Students in Northwestern State University's Hospitality Management and Tourism program presented the 
popular biennial event. 

Guests were able to try foods from India, Japan, France, Chile, Argentina, Russia, Australia, Greece, Hol- 
lywood. California and Morocco. Costumed students served food and wine to guests who purchased coupons 
for $1 each at the Hawaii booth. Students also demonstrated ethnic music and dancing. All proceeds go to the 
Hospitality Management and Tourism Foundation. 




Ex-engineer under arrest in BP 
oil spill case: A former BP en- 
gineer received the first criminal 
charges concerning the BP oil 
spill in the Gulf of Mexico two 
years ago. On Tuesday the Kurt 
Mix was arrested for allegedly 



destroying evidence and two 
counts of obstruction of justice. 
Kurt is accused of intentionally 
deleting over 300 text messages 
that contained information deal- 
ing with the blowout in 2010. 



California teens drunk off 
sanitizer: In the San Fernando 
Valley, Ca., six teenagers were 
sent to the hospital with alcohol 
poisoning. They avoided gulp- 
ing down the soap by using salt 
to isolate the alcohol from the 
rest of the contents. Some hand 



sanitizers can contain up to 65 
percent alcohol. 

Dairy cow found to have 
mad cow disease: There was 
a confirmed case of mad cow 
disease in dairy cow located 
in central California. The meat 
of the animal did not enter the 
nation's food supply, and the 
body of the cow was destroyed 
to prevent further spread of 
the disease. This is the fourth 
known case of the disease in 
America since 2003. 



Index 


Wednesday 

90763° 


Thursday 

89766° 


Friday 

88765° 


Saturday 

87765° 


Sunday 

84760° 


Monday 

81760° 


Tuesday 

84764° 


2 Life 


3 Opinions 

4 Sports 


















Life 



Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 
tiffanythomas4@gmail.com 
April 25, 2012 




Submitted photo 
Students played laser tag inside this inflatpble space shuttle. 

Students aim 
and shoot for fun 



Nic Russo 

Sauce Reporter 

If you don't plan on going into 
the military, paintball hurts 
too much, and the video game 
"Call of Duty" isn't realistic enough 
for you, then laser tag may fulfill 
your adventurous fantasies. 

Last Wednesday about 30 NSU 
students played laser tag courtesy of 
the Student Activities Board, which 
set up a small outer space-themed 
bounce house at Prather Coliseum. 

"At first I thought there was no 
way we could all play laser tag in 
there," Collins, a biology pre-med 
major, said. 

With skepticism, the gamers 
entered the inflatable spaceship 
filled with dark rooms and sharp 
turns. To the gamers' delight, the 
ship defied their expectations. 

"I was surprised that it was 
actually kind of spacious and pretty 
fun," Collins said. 

The Student Activities Board 
helps break up the monotony of the 
routine of studying and class," Alex 
Vadrine, a biology major, said. 



"I think what SAB does is really 
important because it keeps students 
entertained. Without events like 
laser tag, it can get really boring." 

SAB president Shaquille 
Broussard thinks it's a good idea 
for students to have a variety of 
entertainment. 

"I think it is always important to 
bring new things to campus because 
students want to do things that they 
have never done before," Broussard 
said. "Students want to do things 
that they would never normally find 
in Natchitoches rather than the same 
things over and over again." 

Laser tag was the final event 
hosted by SAB for the spring 2012 
semester. Earlier this year, SAB 
hosted an adult comedy show, a 
crawfish boil and a screening of the 
movie "Immortals." 

For more information on the 
Student Activities Board, visit 
www.nsula.orgsync.com/org/nsusab 

,,You can also personally visit 
your SAB representatives in Room 
232 in the Student Union. 




Jacob 
Labutka 

Fashion 
Columnist 



Summer 
fashion tips 

As the academic year comes 
to a close we say goodbye 
to the decline in fashion that 
comes with the time around finals. 

One is lucky to acquire just 
an ounce of sleep during these 
tumultuous times. Many students 
do not care about being differential 
in their dress as they take their 
calculus final, and so their pajamas 
stay on. 

Yes, the end of the semester for 
many proves to be a dismal point 
in their lives. But with great relief 
comes the long awaited span of 
time known as summer. This time 
of year means we can throw away 
our daytime pajama habits and wear 
clothing that celebrates the summer. 

For some, black is a color that 
is worn year round, and if that's 
your only cup of tea then go right 
ahead. But I must advise against it 
because everyone should have some 
"multicolorism" spread in their 
closet. 

Besides, light colors are best 
for summer unless you like the feel 
of sunlight baking through sweaty 
cotton. And now you have all the 



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time to party that you didn't have 
during the semester. 

To combat scorching 
temperatures, try to find thin fabrics 
that are sometimes sheer on the 
shelf but not when worn. Many 
cotton shirts offer this breathability 
that is both comfortable and chic. 
There are plenty of you who plan 
on getting summer jobs to get that 
extra bit of Cash (or for most of us 
to pay the bills). 

It is a very good idea to save, 
but don't let that stop you from 
buying something that's out of 
this world cute. Fashion and fiscal 
responsibility can go hand in hand 
(remember my first column on 
being financially and fashionably 
savvy). 

At the very least, try to make 
this summer fashionably fun and try 
things outside your comfort zone. 
Have a night with the girls and 
try on different colors of clothes, 
makeup or anything you never 
thought would be practical but 
could look all the more cute. 

Something new and different 
I've heard recently is to let your 
hair fall towards the floor, spray 
through with hair spray and then put 
it back to normal. Then it becomes 
easier to style in different ways. Try 
this multiple times at home until 
you find what makes your look pop. 

I know I've covered a little bit of 
everything, but as my last column 

For rest of story : 
check out 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 



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Jebha Babu does it all 



Catherine Beverly 

Sauce Reporter 

Jebha Babu, a sophomore 
studying scientific inquiry 
at the Louisiana Scholars' 
College, can be best described as 
the w hite rabbit of Northw estern 
State University. 

She can be seen running around 
campus saying, "I'm late. I'm late. 
I'm late." This is not because she is 
irresponsible, but more because she 
has so many responsibilities. 

Babu was born in India in 1 992 
and moved to the United States 
seven years ago on the night of July 
3. 

"The cool thing was that a whole 
bunch of fireworks w ent off at 
that night." Babu said. "I felt like 
America was welcoming me." 

Her multicultural background 
is one of the reasons she blends so 
easily into different groups. 

Babu is involved in the Student 
Activities Board as the Lagniappe 
committee head and is the vice- 
president of Demon Dodgeball. On 
the opposite enu of the spectrum are 
her rcles in Northwestern 's Choir 
and as a Freshman Connector. 

In the past weeks. Babu has 
attended multiple lectures by guest 
presenters, attended and worked at 
Spring Fling, and sang in the Men 
and Women's Choir Concert. With 
all of her responsibilities, Babu still 
manages to have good grades in all 
of her classes. 

"I'm dedicated, and I have two 




Submitted photo 

Jebha Babu, Scholar's College is involved in numerous extracurricular activities including Demon Dodgeball. 



detailed calendars. I pray for God's 
strength to help me accomplish 
everything I want from life," Babu 
said. 

Last semester her grades 
qualified her for the Dean's List. 
She also won a minor award in 
speech and debate. 

"On a humorous note, my 
friends and I won the SAI talent 
show competition with our Indian 
dance," Babu said. 

Other students would look at this 
packed schedule and assume that 
she has no time for fun, but Jebha 
disagrees. 

"To relax I hang out with friends, 



do crazy, fun things, watch TV and 
eat good Indian food," Babu said. 

A downside to leading such a 
busy college career is that all of this 
activity leaves Jebha little time to 
sleep. However, her friends don't 
seem to think it puts a damper on 
her spirit. 

"She is a little Indian ball 
of fire," Victoria Kwentua, a 
scientific inquiry major and Jebha's 
roommate, said. With her there's 
always something to do and 
someone new to meet." 

"She is always busy with 
schoolwork and student activities, 
but she still finds time to have fun 



with her friends," Kwentua added. 

Babu's plans for the future 
include becoming a member of the 
Blue Key and Purple Jacket honor 
societies and rejoining the Speech 
and Debate Team next year. On 
top of this, she is continuing her 
education in the biomedical field as 
she dreams to be a doctor. 

"I have a deep calling to 
serve those who are hurt," Jebha 
explained. "Also, I want to travel 
all around the world, and I want to 
continue to serve God musically. 
I would tell anyone to live every 
moment to the fullest, so that there 
will be no regrets." 



SAB event provides NSU with comic relief 



Ty Johnson 

Sauce Reporter 



G 



ood comedy is simply 
born out of truth" is 
what Comedian Azhar 
Usman described as his 
view of good comedy. 

That quote seemed to be the 
theme of SAB 's "Adult Comedy 
Show." Three comics were invited 
to break out the laughing gas for 
SAB's last event of the semester. 

The comics joked about topics 
such as diversity, relationships, 
personal experiences and race. The 
comics entertained a crowd of 1 5 
for two hours. 

SAB President and senior 
business major Shaquille Broussard 
said despite the low attendance, he 
thought the show was enjoyable. 

"Everybody is starting to go 
through their finals and preparing 
for tests." Broussard said. "There 
were other events going at the same 
time. I think it would have been 
better with more people, but I knew 




Photo by Ty Johnson 
Louis Ramey performs his stand-up routine at the Adult Comedy 
Show. 



with all the time conflicts we had 
and the busy schedules, it would 
be a small attendance. It was still a 
good show." 

Broussard said all the comics 
were entertaining, but Louis Ramey 



was his favorite. 

Ramey, a Georgia native, has 
been entertaining crowds over two 
decades. 

"I love the idea that when I walk 
on stage, nobody knows who I am," 



Ramey said. "We're talking about 
complete strangers who don't know 
anything about you and in 35 to 45 
minutes you change that to where 
everyone wants to be your friend 
and everyone feels like they already 
know you." 

Ramey described his acts 
as "pushing the envelope" and 
"walking the line." He said his 
shows were the most successful 
when he deviated from being 
politically correct and was honest 
about what he thought. 

Chicago native Azhar Usman 
said one of his greatest challenges 
as a stand-up comic is writing 
material that is honest about what 
he really thinks. 

"What the comic is saying is 
something everyone has thought or 
noticed at a deeply subconscious 
level," Usman said. "Comics are 
simply taking that and making 

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Opinions 



Catherine Beverly 
Opinions Editor 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
April 25, 2012 



Dead 
week at 
NSU 




Catherine 
Beverly 

Opinions 
Editor 



Since it is the end of the 
semester, there really isn't 
too much to complain about- 
except for NSU's take on a dead 
week before finals. 

Many other universities have a 
week where professors avoid having 
big assignments due so students are 
given a good amount of time before 
finals to study. It seems that NSU 
does the opposite. 

Many students have complained 
of three or four exams being 
due along with some papers and 
projects. Putting all of these 
important assignments to be due 
just before finals week is almost like 
extending finals week into a two- 
week event. 

So busy working on papers and 
studying for tests, many students 
are thinking of pulling all-nighters 
closer to exam time. The option of 
starting to study early is barred to 
them to an extent because of all of 
their other assignments. 

This isn't the only issue with 
finals week. Another is that 
many events are planned on this 
"dead week," including the much 
anticipated "Alice in Wonderland" 
ballet, formal events for some 
organizations and thesis/senior 
project due dates. 

I recommend that we follow the 
tradition of universities like Georgia 
Tech and Iowa State, who advise 
professors not to have huge projects 
or assignments due the week before 
finals. If that is impossible, NSU 
could at least enforce some kind of 
study aid. 

An example of this is California 
State at Sacramento, whose "dead 
week" marks the beginning of the 
Student Union being open until 
2 a.m. with free coffee and study 
lounges available to students who 
need a library-like atmosphere. 

All of these traditions have 
helped students do their best, even 
the traditions like the "primal 
scream". This usually takes place 
at universities that do not have a 
limit on assignments during "dead 
week." 

Dorms strictly enforce a 23/7 
quiet time the week before the 
exams, where the last hour is 
dedicated to the "primal scream," 
which echoes across the campus 
and the college town. This allows 
students to let off steam from the 
stress of finals. 

All in all, many universities 
seem to have some tradition during 
the final week of a semester, but 
NSU does not. If we do, it is not 
practiced by our students. It's 
important for the sanity of students 
to provide ways to keep the stress of 
exams down. 

I implore the next president of 
the student body to make some of 
these changes. I am positive that 
there will be great things if the 
students are allowed an outlet for 
their end-of-semester stress. Not 
only will they do better and become 
more confident in themselves, they 
could have much more school spirit. 

Just think about it. 

Have a great summer! 







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Rants: My last 'Sauce' declamation 




Tom H. 
Lawler 

Opinions 
Columnist 



I once received a fortune cookie 
that read "good writing is clear 
thinking made visible." It also 
contained a typo; it was missing the 
"w" in writing. It was a profound 
typo, needless to say. 

It has now been a few years 
since I began to experiment with 
student media. Over the years I 
have received many opinions on 
my opinions, either of which are 
sometimes not opinions at all-sort 
of like now. 

This has thrilled me. My favorite 
remarks are from those complaining 



that I am too this way or that 
depending on the complainer's own 
leaning. I also enjoy when I am told 
that the articles are not academic, 
global, local, college-life-specific, 
funny, serious, social, political or 
opinionated enough (all in the same 
week, mind you). 

To all of my critics, you are most 
likely right. 

The truth is, each week I realize 
that I have to write a piece for the 
weekly edition. I spend about 30 
minutes researching the topic or 
thinking of quips to jot down. And 
then I just write. It's as simple as 
that. 

You may have counted that 
there are around 400 to 500 words 
in these columns. That is my only 
limit. I am free to choose my topic 
and my content to a certain extent. 
And sometimes this has landed me 



in trouble. 

Which brings up my next issue 
with writing for student media here 
at NSU: guilt. If I have ever poked a 
finger in your side with my writing, 
I apologize. However, you probably 
deserved it. One complaint I have 
with the times is that we are seldom 
critical of ourselves. 

I usually make an effort to 
be critical of my own life, but I 
drastically fall short sometimes; 
perhaps you have noticed. 

But this writing, whether critical 
or not, has all been practice for me. 
Not necessarily practice for writing 
but practice for clear thinking. Now 
the fortune cookie is relevant. 

All one has to do is turn on the 
TV or go sit in traffic on the Keyser 
Bridge, and we can watch hours of 
"unclear thinking." So to me this 
means that there is not enough good 



writing (leading to clear thinking) 
taking place in society. Facebook 
statuses do not count. 

All of these reasons are why 
I love writing. It takes a "pause 
before action" (actual pen to paper) 
which is supposed to be a rational 
thought. Of course the pause does 
not always happen. It takes that 
practice for it to always occur. 

This year is over. Yet, I 
encourage you, if you're attending 
NSU next year or longer, to write 
for this paper and for our other 
writing based RSOs. There might 
be other more obvious benefits 
to membership, but I ask you to 
consider just one profound thing: 
"good writing is clear thinking 
made visible." Come and get some 
practice of both. 

Thanks for reading, everyone! 

Good luck out there. 



Th 




Jarred Roberts 
News Editor 

Tiffany Thomas 
Life Editor 

Katie Beverly 
Opinions Editor 

Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 

Jacob Labutka 
Fashion Columnist 



tJurrentSauce 

Jimmie Walker 
Editor-in-Chief 

Dr. Paula Furr 
Student Media Adviser 




Tom Lawler 
Staff Columnist 

Alexis Reliford 
Staff Reporter 

Kirstie White 
Copy Editor 

Memrie Gibbons 
Staff Reporter 

Taylor Furr 
Delivery Personnel 




Contact us at: 
www.nsucurrentsauce.com 
thecurrentsauce@gmail.com 
Office Phone: 318-357-5381 

This is our last 
issue for the spring semester! 

We hope you enjoyed reading. Good luck on 

finals and have a good summer! We look forward to providing you with 

more newsworthy material next school year. 

Current Sauce staff 



Weekly SUDOKU 



by Linda Thistle 







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The Jordan 
frenzy: 
What's the 
big deal? 

Alyssa Richardson 

Guest Columnist 

magine waking up at 3 a.m. to 

stand in a long line to buy a 
pair of tennis shoes. It sounds crazy 
right? Over a million sneaker heads, 
including myself, do this every Sat- 
urday when a pair of Michael Jordan 
Retro tennis is released. 

Last Saturday Retro 12s were 
released to shoe stores worldwide. 
Customers lined up outside the Hib- 
bett Sports store in Natchitoches as 
early as 2 a.m. awaiting their open- 
ing. With a limited amount of sizes, 
it's a first-come, first-serve basis. 

The Jordan "Frenzy" has not 
only affected Natchitoches, but cit- 
ies across the nation are wondering, 
"what is the big deal?" And I'm here 
to answer that! 

I've been wearing Jordans for 
many years and just like other 
sneaker heads, I genuinely love the 
shoe. Ironically the shoes are not 
new. They have all been sold before, 
but some haven't been re-released in 
more than 1 years, so owning a pair 
is a big deal. 

Newer Jordans have small chang- 
es such as colors variations or an 
extra logo. The Jordans are still rep- 
lica* of past R^tros tbnt were alreatlv 
released, and i still love them. 

The Retro Cardinal 7s were re- 
leased in 2006 and were re-released 
in 20 1 1 with a small change. I pur- 
chased both pairs. You can laugh, 
but you're only laughing because 
you don't understand. 

Infants, toddlers, kids, men and 
women all wear Jordans. These clas- 
sic shoes have swept the nation, but 
many people didn't believe it was a 
big deal, until the death of a custom- 
er in December 201 1 . 

The Retro Concord lis were re- 
leased in 2000 and were not seen 
again until 1 1 years later. I woke up 
at 6 a.m. to stand in line, and many 
others lined up the night before to 
guarantee their purchase. When the 
mall finally opened, chaos began. 
At this line in New Orleans, people 
were trampled over, pushed down 
and hurt. The police came soon after 
the incident. Over 1,000 miles away 
in Washington, D.C, an 18-year-old 
was stabbed and killed while stand- 
ing in line to purchase the shoes. 

This horrible situation sparked a 
lot of fear, but didn't stop me from 
standing in line the next time a shoe 
was released. From reading tweets, 
Instagram posts and Facebook sta- 
tuses, a lot of people have a prob- 
lem with me taking my hard earned 
money, standing in a long line and 
buying a pair of shoes for $163. 
But why? This is my choice and 
my money! Everyone has a love for 
something. I happen to love shoes. 

I can say from experience that 
within the past five years more peo- 
ple, especially females, have been 
purchasing Jordans, who weren't 
before. The "new" sneaker heads 
are causing problems and stirring at- 
tention that we never asked for. We 
don't need anyone's approval on 
what we decide to spend our money 
on! If you don't have a love for Ret- 
ro Jordans, stop trying to understand 
why we do because you never will. 




Submitted photo 
People stand in line for hours to 
be one of the first to own Jordans. 



The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of 
The Current Sauce or the university. All submissions may be edited for clarity and length. 
Guest columnists must be NSU students, but letters to the editor are welcome from anyone. 
All submissions become property of The Current Sauce. Information about our letters policy can be found on our Web site at www. 
nsucurrentsauce.com 




Sports 



Jimmie Walker 
Sports Editor 
jwalker009@student.nsula.edu 

April 25, 2012 



Nic Russo 

Sauce 
Reporter 



If it ain't 
broke, 
don't fix it 

For years, there have been de- 
bates about switching the col- 
lege football BCS system to a 
playoff tournament. 

Many think that this would benefit 
both players and teams. However, 
several keys issues are being over- 
looked. 

First, switching to a playoff system 
would increase the number of games 
played by six games, which means 
when the championship teams meet, 
they would have played 18 games. 
Anyone who has ever played foot- 
ball understands that staying healthy 
for just 12 games is hard enough be- 
cause football hits can be as severe 
as "mini-car crashes." By the time 
a team reaches the championship 
game in a playoff system, players 
may be so physically exhausted that 
the game would not be as exciting. 

Players would be physically and 
mentally tired. They would be un- 
able to focus and apply appropriate 
study time for final exams, which 
fall directly during the playoff sea- 
son. 

In the BCS system, players end 
the regular season, finish finals and 
play their bowl game. Imagine the 
stresses of playing survival games 
every week, watching film and 
studying your playbook, while si- 



multaneously having to write papers 
and study for tests. Adding a play- 
off system could hinder athletes' 
academics. This raises the question: 
what is more important, academics 
or winning football games? 

From a business perspective, it 
makes no sense to switch to playoffs 
games. Bowl games generate mil- 
lions of dollars from advertisements 
and ticket sales. 

The playoffs in the FCS, (a lower 
league level of college football), 
generates little to no money. Accord- 
ing to the "Huffington Post," schools 
earn anywhere from hundreds of 
thousands to multi-millions of dol- 
lars in revenue from bowl games. 
In this last season, LSU earned S22 
million from their bowl game. Even 
smaller school like Toledo and Wake 
Forest earned millions. Ask the 
2011-2012 national FCS champs 
North Dakota how much money 
they made from winning the whole 
thing-next to nothing. 

Finally, the playoffs mean that 
if you play 12 of the worst teams in 
college football and go undefeated, 
then you become the highest seed 
and, thus, have an easier chance of 
winning a championship. Meanwhile 
programs that play top-ranked teams 
and lose one or two are snubbed and 
then ranked on the same level as 
teams who have a weak schedule. 

At the end of the day, the BCS sys- 
tem guarantees that teams who have 
tough schedules have an advantage 
over school that schedule "cupcake 
schools" to make their record look 
impressive. 

Remember, the next time you ar- 
gue to replace the BCS system, ask 
yourself "who actually benefits from 
the playoffs?" Is it the fan at home 
on the couch watching the game, 
or the student-athlete who exhausts 
himself on and off the playing field? 




Jimmie Walker 

Editor-in-Chief 



Dynomite: 
say no to 
the BCS 

The BCS system was incepted 
in 1998 and has since been a 
thorn in the side of college 
football. It never fails to disappoint 
and confuse college football lovers. 
The reasons for its abatement are 
glaringly obvious. 

First, ask yourself this question, 
"how often is a unanimous college 
football champion declared?" Let's 
think back to the 2008-2009 season. 

Pretend you are a senior Utah 
Utes football player, and you just 
capped off the regular season w ith a 
48-24 win over 14th-ranked BYU to 
remain one of two undefeated teams 
in Division I football. As you wait 
for selection Sunday, you can't help 
but think you will be playing in the 
National Championship. 

Well, that never happened. Utah 
was awarded a game against fourth- 
ranked Alabama in the Allstate Sugar 
Bowl, while the Oklahoma Sooners 
(12-1) and the Florida Gators (12-1) 
battled for the rights to say they are 
national champions. 

Fortunately^more like unfortu- 
nately-Utah can claim a share of the 
2009 national title for being the only 
team to finish the season undefeated. 
Boise State had a chance to say the 
same but they lost in the Poinset- 
tia Bowl game against llth-ranked 
TCU. 

This brings me to my second prob- 
lem with the system: the BCS' selec- 
tion process is a debacle. Strength of 
schedule is an important issue. I un- 
derstand that. You don't want a team 



competing for a national title only 
because they beat up on weak op- 
ponents throughout the season. But 
understand that strength of schedule 
isn't an issue with a playoff system. 
A weak team can't hide in the playoff 
system. When they line up against a 
quality opponent, the differences in 
skill will show. 

Ultimately, installing playoffs 
will avoid situations like Utah's and 
Boise's because a computer program 
won't decide who will play in the 
championship. Everything will be 
left on the field 

Finally, let's talk about the play- 
ers. Increasing the number of games 
played is tough on the body. I never 
played college ball, but I played high 
school football for John Curtis, a 
team that always went deep into the 
playoffs. Frankly, you have to pull 
through and compete at your highest 
level no matter the circumstance. 

College football players dream 
about making it the next level. What 
better way to impress scouts than 
to showcase your ability against 
top opponents throughout the play- 
off tournament. Also, the last time 
I checked, the NFL was 16 games 
long. 

Needless to say, the system is 
broken, beat down and ran to the 
ground, but I'm not one to say 
change something without telling 
you how to do it. Here is what I think 
should happen. 

The playoffs should be a 1 6-team, 
single-elimination tournament. The 
higher seeds will play against the 
lower seeds. There are 12 FBS con- 
ferences. Six of those are BCS con- 
ferences. All conference champions 
will earn automatic entry in the play- 
offs. The other four teams will be de- 
termined by strength of schedule and 
regular season record. It's simple. 
Finish first in your BCS conference 
or first in your non-BCS conference, 
and your team will advance into the 
postseason. This way every team has 
equal opportunity to make the post- 
season. All you have to do is win. 



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Former athlete trades shoulder 
pads for camouflage fatigues 



Andrea Nedorostova 

Sauce Reporter 

The cadet captain of NSU's 
ROTC never dreamed of 
being in the Army. But one 
athletic injury changed his life. 

During fall 2007 Michael P. 
Marks tore ligaments in his left 
ankle during football practice in 
Turpin Stadium. He played for the 
Demons only two semesters. 

"Originally, 1 wanted to 
play professional football for 
Philadelphia Eagles, but after that 
practice, I knew that football dream 
was over with," Marks said. 

Marks was bom in New Jersey 
and also lived in Hawaii, Oklahoma 
and Louisiana. His parents also 
served in the military: his mother 
in the Army and his dad in the 
Marines. He enlisted in the Army on 
March 13, 2008, as his two sisters 
and two brothers did before him. 

"My entire family has served 
on active duty," Marks said. "To 
me, ROTC is a stepping stone to 
enhance my career. I joined ROTC 
on August 1 7, 2009, because I 
wanted to not only better my future, 
but develop great leadership skills." 

Now a senior, he is majoring in 
psychology and general studies, 




Submitted photo 

Cadet Marks (in the middle) leading his team during the Ranger Challenge Competition in the fall 2011. 



with minors in military and health 
and exercise sciences. During his 
ROTC training, Marks completed 
the Leadership Development and 
Assessment Course (LDAC), which 
is a centerpiece of ROTC training 
program. 

Marks was a captain of the 
NSU Ranger Challenge Team, and 
a member of the Color Guard. He 
was also a letterman, Platinum 



Medal Athlete and ROTC Honors 
recipient. 

"I want to live an American 
dream," he said. "And 1 want to do 
the Top 10 craziest things in the 
world — whatever they are." 

Marks' plans after graduation 
from NSU are clear. After 
commissioning, he wants 
to continue his education in 
psychology and continue his career 



in the military. 

"I want to have a job that 
would help me reach my goals of 
joining a civil affairs unit and as a 
civilian volunteer to counsel kids at 
different schools from grades 7 to 
12," he said. "As a future officer, I 
plan to lead the troops of the future 
in at least two combat tours before 
retiring." 



Lady Demons look forward to fresh start 



Malcolm Kirkendoll 

Sauce Reporter 

For the first time in Lady 
Demon basketball there will 
be two co-head coaches. With 
new coaches means a new system. 
The Lady Demons are looking to 
take this new system and make it 
into a winning one. 

On April 4, Demons athletic 
director Greg Burke announced 
the co-head coaches of the Lady 
Demons' basketball team. Brooke 
and Scott Stoehr will man the 
controls for the Lady Demons next 
season. 

Burke said he is highly confident 
w ith the hire of the two coaches. 

"They possess a wealth of 
coaching experience and are very 
well-connected and respected in 
the Division I women's basketball 
community," Burke said. 

"They are very familiar with 
the recruiting landscape in this 
region based on their previous 
coaching stops and, in particular, 
are committed to pursuing the best 
players in our home state." 



NSU President Dr. Randall Webb 
is also high on the coaches' arrival. 

"I'm very excited about this 
addition to the Northwestern State 
University family," Dr. Webb said. 
"I am convinced we are going to 
enjoy outstanding recruiting, a 
well-disciplined program with a 
strong defense, a lively offense and 
great success. I can't wait for Lady 
Demon basketball to begin next 
season with Brooke and Scott in 
charge." 

More importantly than the staff 
being happy about new coaches, the 
players are eager for the new start. 

Last Wednesday, there was 
"Meet and Greet Luncheon" for 
the players and coaches to get well 
acquainted with each other. The 
ladies are confident in their new 
coaches. 

Junior guard Jasmine Bradley 
says she is both worried and excited 
about this upcoming season. 

"I'm a little worried but more 
excited about having new coaches," 
Bradley said. "The reason I'm 
worried is because now we start our 
process all over again. With the new 




Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Scott and Brooke Stoehr photographed with returning Lady Demons. 



coaches there will cuts to be made, 
whereas with our last coach we 
pretty much knew where we stood 
in the rotation. I'm excited for the 
new change." 

Bradley, coming off an injury 
last season, is ready to get back on 
the court. 

"I'm anxious to get back on the 
court, but I'm still a little nervous 
though," Bradley said. 
"I haven't played on my knee in a 
year, but ready 1 want to show the 
coaches that I'm ready to play this 
season." 




f w l '% 



Photo by Gary Hardamon 
Scoot and Brooke Stoehr talk 
about being co-head coaches. 



NSU's Gayle Hatch honored May 10 among state's elite 

Courtesy of Sports Info 



orthwestern State basketball great 

N Gayle Hatch, who is one of 
the nation's most influential 
figures in the field of strength 
training and Olympic-style weight- 
lifting, is one of five people being 
honored May 1 at the 22nd Annual 
Louisiana Legends Gala and Auc- 
tion. 

The event, hosted by Friends of 
Louisiana Public Broadcasting, in- 
cludes Gov. and First Lady Jindal 
serving as honorary co-chairs. It an- 
nually honors Louisiana natives who 
have demonstrated excellence and 
brought acclaim to the state in a va- 
riety of careers ranging from enter- 
tainment, the arts, sports, business, 
government, politics, education and 
religion. 

Also honored this year will be 
country music superstar Mickey 
Gilley, world-renowned orthope- 
dic surgeon Dr. James Andrews, 
U.S. Ambassador to Liberia Linda 
Thomas-Greenfield, and business 
and community leader Richard Zus- 
chlag. 

Among past recipients of the 



honor are Lt. Gen. Russel Honore", 
former Govs. Jimmie Davis, John 
McKeithen, Buddy Roemer and 
Dave Treen. sports stars such as 
Hal Sutton, Terry Bradshaw, Willis 
Reed, Bob Pettit, Bert Jones and Lou 
Brock, and entertainers including 
Zachary Richard, Faith Ford, Irma 
Thomas. Pete Fountain and Al Hirt. 

The event will be 
held at the Old State 
Capital in Baton 
Rouge. Information 
is available at the 
lpb.org website. 

Hatch, head coach 
of the 2004 USA 
Men's Olympic 
Weightlifting Team, 
is a member of the 
Louisiana Sports Hall of 
Fame, the USA Weightlift- 
ing and the USA Strength and Con- 
ditioning Coaches Hall of Fames. He 
is enshrined in the Long Purple Line 
Hall of Distinction at Northwestern 
and is in the Graduate N Club ath- 
letic Hall of Fame in recognition of 
his basketball feats as a Demon. 

A Baton Rouge resident and grad- 




Gayle Hatch 



he was a high school All-American. 
Hatch emerged as a basketball star 
at Northwestern. He still holds the 
school record for shooting accuracy 
in a game, making 1 8 of 2 1 shots in 
a 44-point, 18-rebound performance 
against a powerful Kentucky Wes- 
leyan team in 1961, also a state re- 
cord for best aim with over 20 shots 
taken. 

He finished his ca- 
reer with the Demons 
in 1962 and signed a 
professional contract 
with the Chicago Ma- 
jors of the American 
Basketball League, 
the forerunner of the 
ABA which ultimately- 
merged with the NBA. 
But it was his work in 
another gymnasium setting 
that has made Hatch one of the re- 
markable figures in his sport around 
the country and even the world. Af- 
ter his pro basketball career, he re- 
turned home to Baton Rouge, where 
he started his weightlifting and 
stretch training program. 

He had been influenced by trail- 



uate of Catholic High School where blazing Alvin Roy, who trained 



Hatch as an athlete along with other 
Louisiana greats who grew up in Ba- 
ton Rouge, including 1959 Heisman 
Trophy winner Billy Cannon, future 
NBA Ail-Star Bob Pettit and Pro 
Football Hall of Fame fullback Jim- 
my Taylor. When Roy retired, Hatch 
took over at Alvin Roy's Training 
Center and blended Roy's approach 
with an Olympic-style weightlifting 
program. 

It resulted in the development of 
the highly successful Hatch Weight- 
lifing Team, which has won 49 
USA Weightlifting national cham- 
pionships and produced three USA 
Olympians along with 12 members 
of USA teams in World Champion- 
ship competition. His philosophy 
has been utilized by college foot- 
ball teams at LSU. Alabama, Miami 
and Tennessee to win a combined 
six BCS National Championships, 
while Appalachian State won three 
FCS national titles and the baseball 
teams at LSU and Miami claimed 
College World Series titles. 

He has developed countless dis- 
ciples in his sport and has been rec- 
ognized around the state and country 
for his contributions.